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92 votes

How can I say I can't guarantee information I'm about to give is correct?

I would suggest don't quote me on this as the phrase you seek. The literal meaning of course, is to ask that responsibility for a statement not be ascribed to the person making it, such as an insider ...
choster's user avatar
  • 43.4k
91 votes

Why Third 'Reich'? Why is 'reich' not translated when 'third' is? What is the English synonym of reich?

Although English historians have defined Reich as being a strictly German concept of sovereign rule, in the German language itself it means "Empire". In English, we speak of the Holy Roman Empire; in ...
Chris W.'s user avatar
  • 1,024
54 votes
Accepted

How can I say I can't guarantee information I'm about to give is correct?

"Don't hold me to that!" to hold Vocabulary.com keep in a certain state, position, or activity maintain (a theory, thoughts, or feelings) And your suggestion is nice too: 'Don't pin me ...
lbf's user avatar
  • 30.4k
46 votes

Why Third 'Reich'? Why is 'reich' not translated when 'third' is? What is the English synonym of reich?

To complement R Mac's answer, Reich entered the English lexicon in this use in the 18th and 19th centuries, so by the time the Third Reich rose in the 1930s, the word would have needed no translation. ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
42 votes
Accepted

What does "a shnip" mean?

It is Yiddish, and means an insignificant person: Green’s Dictionary of Slang schnip n. [Yid.] an insignificant person. Green's Dictionary of Slang
Lambie's user avatar
  • 15.1k
32 votes
Accepted

Is there an English word for "Kundenbekämpfung" (customer combatting)

I know of no common idiom. However, customer disservice is an occasional coinage on the basis of customer service that may work here as a contrasting pair. Using disservice instead of service will ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
27 votes

Is there a term for "symbolic photo" (German "Symbolfoto")?

The German language is fond of gluing nouns together to form new nouns that are distinct from the whole of their parts. English does have "symbol"(/symbolic) and "photo," and often ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 5,792
24 votes
Accepted

English term corresponding to German “Ausgangssperre”

In English, Curfew refers to a time imposed by the authorities where you can’t be on the streets after a certain time at night. You can travel all you want during the day but you can’t be outside at ...
Mitch's user avatar
  • 71.7k
23 votes

Describe that someone’s explanation matches your knowledge level

I'd suggest variations on Pitch, such as the phrases Pitched it well or pitched it just right/at the right level (tr) to aim or fix (something) at a particular level, position, style, etc: if ...
Spagirl's user avatar
  • 11.7k
22 votes
Accepted

Why is it "Rhine", but "Rhenish"?

Sometimes, there are phonological rules that tell you what the sound change should be under a modifications. But here it just seems to be a historical/cultural choice, not uncommon in English, to ...
Mitch's user avatar
  • 71.7k
19 votes

Why Third 'Reich'? Why is 'reich' not translated when 'third' is? What is the English synonym of reich?

Interestingly, the "First Reich" is the Holy Roman Empire. So the concept of the "Reich" as understood by speakers of German transcended language and cultural shifts over a very long period of time, ...
R Mac's user avatar
  • 3,598
19 votes

What does "a shnip" mean?

As Lambie's answer points out, Jonathon Green's Dictionary of Slang identifies schnip as Yiddish slang, dating to the 1960s. A Google Books search turns up a couple of earlier instances. From Peter ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 165k
15 votes

How can I say I can't guarantee information I'm about to give is correct?

The identical expression exists in English, but it deals with specificity or the ease of categorization rather than truth or accuracy: Unfortunately, this guess can't be nailed down without lots of ...
KarlG's user avatar
  • 28.2k
14 votes
Accepted

Why didn't "spiel" get spelled with an "sh"?

As others have mentioned, spiel may actually be derived from German Spiel rather than, or in addition to, Yiddish shpil. In German, syllable-initial /ʃ/ (the "sh" sound) is written with the trigraph &...
herisson's user avatar
  • 82.8k
14 votes

How can I say I can't guarantee information I'm about to give is correct?

Take this with a grain of salt (With) a grain of salt", (or "a pinch of salt") is an idiom of the English language, which means to view something with scepticism or not to interpret something ...
The Gilbert Arenas Dagger's user avatar
13 votes
Accepted

Describe that someone’s explanation matches your knowledge level

You could use the word meet (in the sense of connection or joining), as in "You met me at my level."
McCaverty's user avatar
  • 572
12 votes

Why Third 'Reich'? Why is 'reich' not translated when 'third' is? What is the English synonym of reich?

The use of the German word "Reich" clearly conveys that one is referring to Germany (or at least to a German-speaking country). If one were to replace "Reich" by "Empire" (or a similar English-...
TrevorD's user avatar
  • 12.2k
11 votes

English term corresponding to German “Ausgangssperre”

I'd suggest lockdown it has certain prison-ey connotations, but definitely has the negative slightly ambiguous 'you must obey' style vibe.
ilikeprogramming's user avatar
10 votes

Is there one word for fat gotten from stress eating (Kummerspeck)?

German tends to create new words by combining existing words. English doesn't tend to do this as much so leaving a space between the words "comfort eating" would strike me as fairly close.
MikeJRamsey56's user avatar
9 votes

Describe that someone’s explanation matches your knowledge level

I would say it was "right at my level." You have "high level" explanations; "overviews" - like a picture of a building. You have "detailed" level, where you have the pipes and walls, such as a ...
Engineer's user avatar
  • 571
9 votes

Why is it "Rhine", but "Rhenish"?

Wiktionary gives Rhinish as an alternative form for Rhenish. There are also Rhenian, Rhenic and Rhenane. According to Wiktionary the etymology is: From Rhine +‎ -ish (with the first element taking ...
Zebrafish's user avatar
  • 12.7k
8 votes
Accepted

What nouns of German origin should be given capital letters?

(1) General concept of nativization Languages have a strong tendency to gradually nativize or naturalize loan words. That means that at first,(i) loan words retain aspects of foreign pronunciations ...
Richard Z's user avatar
  • 2,021
8 votes

Origin of ending a sentence with a preposition-German separable verbs?

Old English had a more flexible word order than modern English. However, I don't see any evidence that it ever used verb, object, preposition order as in German. Object before verb (OV) Because of its ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.6k
8 votes
Accepted

Origin of ending a sentence with a preposition-German separable verbs?

This won't be an answer, exactly, but more of a pointer towards other sources. First of all, terminology. What you are talking about is called preposition stranding. It seems to be very rare (...
linguisticturn's user avatar
8 votes

English term corresponding to German “Ausgangssperre”

The Oxford Duden German Dictionary Oxford University Press 1998 edition, translates Ausgangssperre as - "curfew" (für Soldaten - for soldiers), confinement to barracks. No mention here is made of "...
WS2's user avatar
  • 64.7k
8 votes

Which preposition should be used in this translation? "Analysis… through/with/by neural networks"

Durch also has the English senses through, via and with. The word by could also be used in the example in English, and by means of would fit too. Wiktionary by means of Preposition by means of by ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
8 votes

Which preposition should be used in this translation? "Analysis… through/with/by neural networks"

In the context of a thesis title, I don't think "through" is out of place here at all, in fact I'd expect it. I've seen many thesis titles that use the word "through" in exactly ...
FireSBurnsmuP's user avatar
7 votes

How can I say I can't guarantee information I'm about to give is correct?

"...but no guarantees" Literally this means that the giver has no responsibility to the receiver if the "product" (in this case, the advice/assertion) proves to be faulty. Caveat emptor This is a ...
Artelius's user avatar
  • 387

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