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Using "me" (or indeed other object pronouns) like this generally considered to be grammatically incorrect, because a subject pronoun ("I") should be used as subject of the verb. In formal (and probably everyday middle-of-the-road) language, this misuse of object pronouns is to be avoided. You should use "Adam and I", with "...


7

I think the reason this causes confusion is that children are often corrected without explaining why. For example: a child says “Me and Pete are going to play a game.”  This is wrong, so they they're told to say ‘Pete and I’ instead of ‘Me and Pete’.  However, the child hears that ‘Me and Pete’ is always wrong, and then either overcorrects to “The teacher ...


6

'Correct', and 'wrong' are words used to describe speech taught by language teachers and by newspaper copy editors, but they are not very useful for describing how people actually speak and write. Native English speakers and non-native alike are taught things like "Use the nominative 'I' in subject position (and at the end if in a conjunction)." in ...


3

My question is how natural does that sound to you? It sounds perfectly natural to me. It sounds horribly wrong to my dad. This is a change in English grammar that has been in progress for a while, but is not yet 100% complete. The issue is whether or not conjunctions are transparent to case assignment. If they are, then yeah, a personal pronouns occurring ...


3

When speaking, we sometimes say things that aren't grammatically correct, such as the example you shared above. However, in writing, we (at least, those who care about grammar) tend to sound as grammatically correct as possible. So, no, "Me and Adam" in that instance is definitely inaccurate, therefore it sounds unnatural. If you omit "and ...


3

Not exactly, but to understand why and how you need to look at the full Cambridge sentence, which, if my research is correct, is "No one of these properties is unique to adjectives, but only adjectives possess all four." In that version of the sentence, "one" is setting up a contrast with "all four." In other words, while there ...


1

The use(s) of of with quantifiers The usual function of "a couple" can be described by the label of "quantifier". Other words that can act as quantifiers include numerals, more, and all. Many quantifiers cannot directly precede a definite noun phrase: we can't say "twenty the children" or "more the children". Since a ...


1

The verb wish can take modally remote finite clauses as complements. The verb hope in contrast cannot. This verb must take what are sometimes referred to as indicative finite clauses. I wish that it will rain today. (Wrong, wish + indicative clause) I wish that it would rain today. I hope that it will rain today. I hope that it would rain today. (Wrong, ...


1

Although I would personally use built, if you want something closer to blessed, the most practical word I can think of that still has some of that meaning is favoured (or favored, depending on the regional spelling): 1 : having an appearance or features of a particular kind 2 : endowed with special advantages or gifts Its use in the example sentences ...


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