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94 votes

Verb meaning "to alter someone's famous saying"

Is 'Misquote' not an acceptable answer? Misquote - quote (a person or a piece of written or spoken text) inaccurately.
Bhoomika Arora's user avatar
76 votes

Verb meaning "to alter someone's famous saying"

With apologies to - Although this has been trotted out a bit too often, it nevertheless does what you want - it shows you know what you did, and acknowledges you did it on purpose. It is the ...
Phil Sweet's user avatar
74 votes
Accepted

"Can I" vs "May I" in restaurant setting when ordering

I believe 'can' is more appropriate in a restaurant. Firstly it is quite possible that you cannot have something that is on the menu because it is no longer available. Asking if you 'can' have the ...
Eric Nolan's user avatar
  • 1,240
69 votes

"Can I" vs "May I" in restaurant setting when ordering

In the dilemma "may" vs. "can" and which form is preferable, it depends on how old the speaker is, where they live and which dialect of English they speak. There is an age-old debate that can in ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 91.9k
53 votes

Verb meaning "to alter someone's famous saying"

To bastardise Churchill's famous saying, I have nothing to offer but blood, sweat and misquotes The link is to Cambridge dictionary, where bastardise is defined as to change something in a way that ...
Chris H's user avatar
  • 21.8k
45 votes
Accepted

Naturalness of expressions like "Me and Adam have discovered ....." in conversational English

Using "me" (or indeed other object pronouns) like this generally considered to be grammatically incorrect, because a subject pronoun ("I") should be used as subject of the verb. In ...
phhu's user avatar
  • 523
36 votes
Accepted

Does the word candidate have to refer to a person?

Collins definition 4 has the following (my emphasis): A candidate is a person or thing that is regarded as being suitable for a particular purpose or as being likely to do or be a particular thing. ...
Charl E's user avatar
  • 3,435
28 votes
Accepted

Verb meaning "to alter someone's famous saying"

You say you are looking for 'way of saying that you are slightly, but intentionally, modifying a famous phrase'. Breaking that down, it seems that the modification would be obvious, leaving the need ...
Spagirl's user avatar
  • 11.7k
25 votes
Accepted

Is there an antonym for "paucity" that means not scarce and not necessarily but possibly enough?

The problem is that you've written a sentence form that appears in many introductions of technical manuscripts with a different meaning: "There was a sparsity/paucity of research in this area[, ...
Chemomechanics's user avatar
22 votes

Is the word "stool" an informal word or a formal word?

It is only ever used in a formal medical sense, with examples from the sixteenth century. Stool derives from the name given to an enclosed chamber, or commode, used for producing stools. The most ...
WS2's user avatar
  • 64.8k
17 votes
Accepted

Using 'Signed' as a Closing

It's used by the person reading the letter out loud in order to make it clear that the name is formatted on the letter as a signature. And, as jsw29 states,'No, signed is not normally used in writing ...
Hot Licks's user avatar
  • 27.5k
16 votes

"Can I" vs "May I" in restaurant setting when ordering

Beyond Grammar and Into the Social Codes If you have ever taught English, you might know that "May I have x" is a polite form. This really is not about grammar. It's about how certain expressions are ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 15.2k
15 votes

Is there an antonym for "paucity" that means not scarce and not necessarily but possibly enough?

sufficiency the state of being sufficient (MW) adequate body of literature on this topic (to justify this survey) of a level of quality that meets one's needs or standards (MW)
FluffyFlareon's user avatar
14 votes

What phrase can be used to accept an unneeded apology?

You might say "Not at all!" in this situation: you're strenuously denying that there is any apology needed, which isn't actually obvious from the usage (which on the face of it looks like a non ...
Max Williams's user avatar
  • 23.1k
14 votes
Accepted

Which is the more accepted spelling between “doughnut” or “donut” in formal academic prose?

When asking about contemporary usage in academia it is almost always better to simply check usage in the specific domain. For example, in mathematics and engineering the word "doughnut" / "donut" may ...
JeremyDouglass's user avatar
13 votes

Is there an antonym for "paucity" that means not scarce and not necessarily but possibly enough?

I would propose limited. Saying, There is a limited amount of research on this topic. would imply that, although there is some research that has been done and published on the topic, there isn't ...
Cody Gray - on strike's user avatar
13 votes
Accepted

Use of generic "one" without having to revel the gender

Would using a generic singular they be a good option here? or is there a better option? I suggest abandoning the impersonal pronoun "one", and replacing it with "you". The more ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 91.9k
12 votes

Is the word "stool" an informal word or a formal word?

"Stool" is more formal than poop or poo but sometimes more comfortable to say than feces or excrement. You could say "I've been having loose stool" to express that you don't quite ...
DavePhD's user avatar
  • 10.6k
12 votes

A fancier way of saying, “I'm not a fan of…”

My favorite expression to use in this case would be I don't particularly care for, as in: I don't particularly care for Moby's style of Electronica, but it's undeniable that his single Porcelain ...
psosuna's user avatar
  • 2,795
11 votes

Verb meaning "to alter someone's famous saying"

If you wish to signal that you are playing with the quotation, you could write: "As Churchill might have said-" or "With apologies to Churchill-" or even "As Churchill never said-" But ...
Michael Lorton's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Difference between "touching", "about" and "concerning" as a preposition

Notice how the example usage in Macmillan is not a complete sentence, and is preceded by a noun: questions touching party politics or religion whereas your example uses a verb before the word ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 59k
10 votes

"Can I" vs "May I" in restaurant setting when ordering

No Practical Difference In the Pacific Northwest region of the US (to include northern Idaho, eastern and western Washington, and central Oregon), it is commonly acceptable to order food in a variety ...
Kharmageddon's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Is the em dash used in formal writing?

Em dashes can be used if allowed by your style guide (but don't use them too often). For example, this is what APA says: First, when would you use an em dash? The Publication Manual (p. 97) notes ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.7k
8 votes

Verb meaning "to alter someone's famous saying"

Tweak 3. to make a minor adjustment to: e.g. to tweak a computer program. Can be used colloquially to represent taking any idea of someone else's, then changing it slightly to make it your ...
brandondoge's user avatar
  • 1,404
8 votes

Does the word candidate have to refer to a person?

The use of candidate for a project is, I believe, supported by all dictionaries. The difference between Merriam-Webster's and Oxford's or Collins' wording is no coincidence: one likely or suited to ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
8 votes

Phrase equivalent to "I don't give a damn", not out of place in a 1930s context

Here are some options (with examples near the 1930s): Don't care an atom (1847, 1909) Don't care a button (1919) Don't give/care a doggone (1923, 1939) Don't care a (red) cent (1919, 1924) Don't give/...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.7k
8 votes

Naturalness of expressions like "Me and Adam have discovered ....." in conversational English

I think the reason this causes confusion is that children are often corrected without explaining why. For example: a child says “Me and Pete are going to play a game.”  This is wrong, so they they're ...
gidds's user avatar
  • 2,773

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