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125

"Hole in the wall"? Here's the definition from Oxford Dictionaries: hole in the wall 1. chiefly North American A small dingy place, especially a bar or restaurant Another definition from English Daily: Definition A small, simple place, particularly a shop or restaurant Example Let's go to the Italian restaurant on Smith Street. It's just a ...


93

Crisps that have gone soft are often labeled 'soggy'. Here are three links that tell you how to make soggy crisps palatable again: Wave goodbye to soggy crisps: Simple bag sealing trick Never Have A Soggy Crisp Again With This 30-Second Hack Stale bread and soggy crisps: How to bring old food back from the dead UPDATE: The original question asked about ...


83

There's no word for this as such; in the UK 'fried eggs' always means 'sunny-side up', some places will understand 'over easy' but that's the limit of what is common knowledge. Something like "I don't want the yolks runny" Or "I want the yolks cooked through" should do the trick. This is anecdotal, as I can't find any references to this. When they ...


74

English speakers have been calling white liquids “milk” since Old English. But please don’t drink spurge milk (i.e. its white, latex-like sap), since it’s poisonous: Wið weartan genim þysse ylcan wyrte [sc. spurge's] meolc & clufþungan wos, do to þære weartan.  Pseudo-Apuleius' Herbarium “With warts, take the wort (spurge’s) milk & clove-...


73

In the UK (and apparently in the USA according to Wikipedia) we often use the term 'greasy spoon cafe' (or just 'greasy spoon') to refer to a small, grubby, generic eaterie of the not-salubrious kind. The name "greasy spoon" is a reference to the typically high-fat, high-calorie menu items such as eggs and bacon. The term has been used to refer to a "...


71

Consider decadent, which means: 1. Characterized by or reflecting a state of moral or cultural decline. 1.1. Luxuriously self-indulgent. Foods are often characterized as "decadent" when they are overly luxurious, that is, sweet or fatty or otherwise bad for you but delicious (here). For example, big burgers are often characterized as decadent (...


70

A dive is any run-of-the-mill, local operation whose culture/decor is far below socially accepted norms. The term comes from dive bar, where a dive is essentially the same thing, except for eateries. Dives typically are unkempt, cheap, lined with buffets, and keep their restrooms locked.


69

I'm a Brit who prefers fried eggs hard. There isn't a usual British English name for that, because it's an unusual preference here. I ask for them "Hard-fried, so that the yolks are solid" and that usually works. Any variety of "over" in the description of a fried egg in the UK risks confusion. Many people know it is an American way of cooking eggs, but ...


69

Contrary to what you may think, the single word that people actually use to distinguish from spicy is: mild. This is often used to see how spicy you want something: "How do you want your spaghetti sauce: hot, medium, or mild?" That's the continuum. If you are talking about other dimensions of seasoning, like say turmeric or horseradish or bay ...


63

I wasn't able to find any dictionary which included plant-based food in the definition of "seafood." Merriam-Webster (American English): edible marine fish and shellfish American Heritage: Edible fish or shellfish from the sea. Chambers (British): Shellfish and other edible marine fish. Some other sources: The US FDA has a searchable "seafood ...


53

BrE Crisps = AmE Chips and they go stale (chewy or even slightly rancid because the oil on them goes bad) Frying them will not help because they will just burn BrE Chips = AmE Fries and they will become soggy (lose their outer crunch from moisture escaping the inner part) and eventually dry out (not sure there is a word for that though, I would probably not ...


51

One obvious answer is sultanas (AKA golden raisins, defined as dried white grapes - Cambridge). A better answer is prunes (dried plums - Cambridge ) . Interestingly raisin and prune are both the French name for the matching undried fruit. Another oddity is currant both a small raisin and (black-, white-, or red-) a completely different fruit (Cambridge ...


49

Yes, they are pomes a fruit consisting of a fleshy enlarged receptacle and a tough central core containing the seeds, e.g., an apple or pear. Pome:Google dictionary.


47

Flexitarian — Dictionary noun 1. a person whose diet is mostly vegetarian but sometimes includes meat, fish, or poultry. Also called semi-vegetarian — Wikipedia Specific flexitarian diets include: Pollotarian: someone who eats chicken or other poultry, but not meat from mammals, often for environmental, health or food justice reasons. Pescetarian: ...


40

A number of Spanish names for chili peppers have migrated into English (at least in parts of the western and southwestern United States, where many types of chilies are sold in fruit and vegetable markets). Three varieties of these peppers have different names when fresh and when dry: poblano chilies (fresh) are called ancho chilies (dried) chilaca chilies (...


36

Along the same lines as "decadent" is "sinful": : wrong according to religious or moral law : very bad or wicked : extremely enjoyable in a way that makes you feel guilty As with "decadent", you can also find widespread usage of "sinful" with respect to foods both savory and sweet. Although "sinful" has other primary meanings, in the context of ...


35

I'd use stale. It may be particular to my region maybe. stale (of food) no longer fresh and pleasant to eat; hard, musty, or dry. ‘stale bread’Oxford Living Dictionaries


33

Goji berries are dried wolfberries (Lycium barbarum) If you saw a fresh wolfberry and you knew it looked like the thing on a packet of something that contained "Goji berries", you might call the fresh berry a Goji berry too, but actually Goji are always dried. The name comes from Chinese where Goji is specifically the name of the dried berry.


33

I work for a pizza chain and we always just say cook. Technically, the method of cooking is baking as that means "place in a hot chamber for a period of time". Other words, such as boil, roast, etc. have different meanings. But people often use vocabulary appropriate to the type of food. They often talk about roasting meat because that is how meat used to ...


31

The word toast in the sense of "toasted bread" is an English coinage from the early 15th century and originally referred to bread that was added to wine or ale for flavour (and possibly to soak up the dregs). In that context, a mass noun made more sense than a countable one, since toast didn't come in slices. It was only in the 17th century that toast ...


31

In the UK, whilst most people will understand that 'Asian / Chinese' dumplings are some kind of food, wrapped in dough, plain-old dumplings are something else far more ordinary. A dumpling, in the UK, is a ball of self-raising flour and suet (shredded hard animal or vegetable fat) bound with water, which is cooked in a stew, so that it takes on the flavour ...


30

Just for the sake of completeness, one more term that would fit would be Mom and Pop (or Ma and Pa) Restaurant. Mom and Pop would refer to the fact that it is a local establish (not a chain) and was often the case back in the day, literally owned and ran by a local couple. They are typically unfussy establishments with a focus on comfort food/"home cooking"...


30

"Omaha Steaks" is the brand of the meat. Although it sounds clumsy it is correct.


29

No... I mean ... Yes ... I mean ... It's complicated. Technically, of course a hamburger is a sandwich, by looking at a dictionary definition. Or to be pedantic (and give prelude to the complication), those things called 'hamburger' include all those properties that are defined and given the label 'sandwich'. But what something 'is' and what something is '...


29

The corresponding expression to citrus fruit is pomaceous fruit(s): Thus, the apple, crab, pear, quince, medlar, and possibly others are designated as “pomaceous" fruits, each having certain specific (as contrasted with general) natural characters in common. — US Dept. of Agriculture, Agriculture Yearbook, 1926. I could not use a Google Book NGram to ...


28

How about guilty pleasure [ODO] Something, such as a film, television programme, or piece of music, that one enjoys despite feeling that it is not generally held in high regard. It's not limited to food but it's common enough that the food channel has a show with the same name.


28

A state of Connecticut definition (for the purpose of a specific law concerning the requirement of a certificate of registration for the retail sale of seafood) is: "Seafood" means all fresh or saltwater finfish, molluscan shellfish, crustaceans and other forms of aquatic animal life [emphasis added] which would lead us to believe that plant products ...


26

In England, I have heard them referred to as: 'caff's, as they are a bit too down-market to earn the title café. I reckon that the expression would be understood throughout the UK. I agree with others: 'greasy-spoon': provides lots of calories for little expense, perfect to fuel folks who do hard physical work. 'local café': small place, with a bit of ...


23

How about a joint? Informal. an establishment of a specified kind, especially one where people meet for eating, drinking, or entertainment. "a burger joint" Google or Slang a. A cheap or disreputable gathering place: "The tavern is ... just a joint with Formica tables, a vinyl floor, lights over the mirrors" (Scott Turow). b. A ...


23

Semi-vegetarian is used (often in the same sense as flexitarian). You can distinguish subspecies, like pescetarian (allowing fish and seafood with a vegetarian diet) is attested in Merriam-Webster since 1993. More subtle, pollotarian has few occurrences (Urban Dictionary, Pollotarian diet), varying between "adding poultry only" to vegetarian, and "eating ...


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