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The English meaning of the word sensible seems to stem from a medieval theory of mind. The word sensible is an adjective which in the 19th century had two different meanings, related to the two different nouns sense and sensibility: sense: 3 [mass noun] a sane and realistic attitude to situations and problems sensibility: 1 the quality of being ...


2

Wiktionary, despite its lack of reliability and comprehensiveness, is in the right direction. Etymonline (which uses OED) has a more detailed explanation: strait (the adjective for narrow) is cognate with French 'étroit' both from Old French estreit, estrait from Latin strictus. Etymonline says "More or less confused with unrelated 'straight' " straight (...


2

ODO says they have a connection, although they came from different sources. The word straight is the old past form of Old English stretch, and originally meant ‘extended at full length’. The sense relating to an alcoholic drink, ‘undiluted’, is the American equivalent of neat and dates from the middle of the 19th century. The straight and narrow is the ...


2

I'd say that is a former friend. [edit, courtesy Papa Poule] or a former pal/chum/compadre former adjective 1 Having previously been a particular thing: her former boyfriend 1.1 Of or occurring in the past: the seafarers of former times 2 (the former) Denoting the first or first mentioned of two people or things: I take the former ...


2

Do not use it. There is no such term. The nearest correct term is With respect to With respect to Section 13 of the contract, my client would like to suggest a change. To compare: In terms of In terms of enforceability, the contract is weak.


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'Strait' seems to carry connotations of constraint as well as narrowness and is used in several expressions where 'straight' is meaningless, for example 'dire straits' and 'straitened circumstances'. In these expressions there is the connotation of the person in the condition having their choices constrained. When the Authorised Version of the Bible was ...


1

Understand that "realize" is being used (and perhaps slightly misused), in the above sense, to differentiate from "conceptualize". When you take a concept and make it "real" you have "realized" it. In this sense it's probably best applied to simple algorithms and the like -- you would not say that a giant skyscraper is the realization of its blueprints.


1

Yes, it is possible to use 'realise' in the meaning of 'create/implement', but 'implement' is most suitable, because in contemporary English word 'realise' is a synonim to 'understand'.


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