38

The reason for "the" is that this refers to a particular 3.5 bn year limit, i.e. the specific one that was mentioned in the previous research. You may object that there aren't distinct 3.5 bn years ago eras - there can only be one. Logically that is true but sometimes usage overrides logic. So we could say 3.5 billion years ago, there was volcanic ...


16

This is so because "3.5 bn years" is determined by the that-clause (that is the estimate derived…) and that it is a unique possibility. This is not the bundle (that) they showed to you. (unique) This is not a bundle (that) they showed to you. (not unique) The determination can result from other circumstances. This is during the first hour on the ...


15

I would suggest the person is a poor (or sore, or bad) loser poor loser : a person who becomes upset or angry when he or she loses Merriam Webster For example, here's a recent usage regarding the American presidential election: 'Trump looking like a poor loser' as US President begins legal battle against Biden voters (Special note: In Japanese the phrase ...


12

to "lay by the heels" was a method of punishment and restraint in times gone by To place one's hands or feet in shackles; to lock up or imprison one Free dictionary Here is a depiction: Getty Images The bilboes referred to in the picture are: An iron bar with sliding shackles, formerly used for confining a prisoner's ankles Oxford Lexico ...


11

Previous studies suggested that volcanic activity on The Moon ended about 3.5bn years ago. The analysis of recently collected rocks, however, have lead scientists to suspect volcanic activity ended after the accepted 3.5hn years. "the" refers to the previous estimate, 3.5bn years.


6

One English word that describes someone who does not admit their wrongdoings is unrepentant. The Oxford English Dictionary defines the word thus: Feeling or evincing no regret for one’s wrongdoings; impenitent. Now also more generally: not sorry for any action or behaviour, unapologetic. The word is not restricted to referring to one's attitude at death. ...


4

I would call that person a bad sport or a poor sport (in addition to acting like a sore loser). poor/bad sport : a person who is rude or angry about losing It is the opposite of showing good sportsmanship. An example used in social-emotional learning here: "It's always upsetting to see your child behave like a bad sport."


4

The phrases "3.5bn years ago" and "the estimate derived from studies of currently available samples" are in apposition to each other - both refer to the same thing. You can leave out the first "the" by separating the two phrases with a comma: ... until far more recently than 3.5bn years ago, the estimate derived from studies of ...


3

"Brainstorm" seems appropriate. It's generally used in the context of a group, but there's nothing wrong with using it to describe one person's action. In case you need a noun, ideation is the process of generating ideas. "Throw out" can work, but it could also be interpreted as "discard" or "reject" if the context isn'...


3

There's a phrase which comes from poker, when one places all of his chips in, in demonstration that he is totally committed to this hand. I'm all in be all in: 1. To be fully committed to a task or endeavor; to give or be prepared to give all of one's energy or resources toward something. (The Free Dictionary)


3

Early instances from U.S. newspapers Here are four instances of "buck up" used as a verb phrase in the United States during the 1830s. From "Joe Bunker's Story," in the [Lawrenceburg] Indiana Palladium (June 30, 1832), reprinted from the Camden Mail: I kind a reckon none of you ever heard of Deby Snook, caze its a tarnation great secrete,...


2

I might call such a person Stubborn to the end Someone who is stubborn to the end would rather die than admit their wrongdoing. I feel this fits the original sense due to the "to the end" part - the "end" being death.


2

Searches of the Google Books, Hathi Trust, and Elephind book, periodical, and newspaper databases turn up eighteen unique instances of some form of the phrase "burn the candle at the other end" used in a figurative sense from 1872 to 1930. I reproduce them here in chronological order and with as much context as seems reasonable to include. The ...


2

When someone is saying this sentence, he doesn't mean "I now know that she regularly does this" (in which case know would fit) but "I have at various times known that he did it at those respective times", meaning (for example) "I knew last Tuesday that he did it at that time, and I knew three weeks ago that he did it three weeks ago&...


2

The person can be described as an academic in the sense that their knowledge and research are not connected (at least yet) to real world situations.


2

I would say that at this stage they are promising: full of promise : likely to succeed or to yield good results e.g. a promising new medicine It can equally apply to an individual, who is looking to prove themselves in the real world.


2

The only thing that's perhaps "incorrect" with your sentences is that they are pleonastic. Of course, breakfast is had in the morning only. So perhaps you could have said "I don't have time for breakfasts."


2

If someone asks me how many bananas I have, and I say "I think I have seven", and then they ask me how many oranges I have, and I say "I think I have seven", the number "seven" has appeared twice, but it's not the same seven. They refer to different things and might be obtained from different sources and have different levels of ...


2

Put one's hand in one's pocket is an informal way of referring to spending money. It doesn't mean 'give something to someone', although of course that could be the reason for the expense. Your sentence is OK as a colloquial way of saying that one man decided to pay for something for another man.


1

You might cut up the sentence into small sentences each containing one idea or two, at most, and connect them through the use of key words and pronouns. This meant communications had to be relayed by a satellite which had been cunningly located for the purpose at a place where the interaction of the gravitational fields of Earth and Moon meant it could ...


1

This feels wrong to me. The below feels OK: than the 3.5bn years [no ago] that is the estimate derived from studies of currently available samples. As does: than [no the] 3.5bn years ago, (that/which) is the estimate derived from studies of currently available samples. Specifically, I would say *the* 3.5bn years ago basically feels wrong in the original....


1

I did have to look at the text a few times, so I can see how you made the mistake but I did, at last, understand the reason for their choice. The point is that the paragraph concentrates on a particular exhibition of the work of Charles James and speaks in detail about his work so, to be consistent, C is the best choice since it mentions James and his work ...


1

'Putting one's hand in one's pocket' is a common phrase that means spending one's own money but only as long as the phrase fits contextually. Also, this phrase doesn't mean you're giving someone something but you're spending something for yourself or others. Your two sentences... He put his hand in his pocket and bought it for the guy. I'll have to put my ...


1

Bring to the fore To emphasize something or make it more noticeable. Be sure to bring this argument to the fore when you rewrite your paper. Discrepancies in the yearly budget report brought questions of corruption to the fore. [The Free Dictionary]


1

Perhaps you can say "I say albeit regretfully that..."


1

Adding swim fins make a swimmer a more efficient swimmer. But donning them before a track event would be a disaster. The efficiency in one arena becomes a burden in another. The bicycle is efficient; perhaps the most efficient mechanism ever devised. (Exploratorium: Science of Cycling) Like a fish needs a bicycle Since it does not have legs and cannot pedal,...


1

There is a word that describes the witless and uncritical acceptance of ideas. It comes from French “fly-swallower” and is: Gobemouche = A credulous person, especially : one who believes everything he or she hears Merriam Webster The gobemouche, having accepted the flawed premises, then goes on to argue on the basis of them. Regrettably, it is not well ...


1

I suggest swamp swamp = If something swamps a person, system, or place, more of it arrives than can be easily dealt with Cambridge dictionary Hence we may say that B swamps A with too much information. This usage is consistent with my own experience.


1

Your sentence structure is: Someone gave (to) Somebody else Something as Role. Consider the following: Alex gave Arnold some worms as bait. Bob gave Barry a degree as Principal. In the first instance, the worm (not Alex) is the bait. In the second, Bob (not the degree) is the principal. Context matters a great deal in these kinds of sentences. In your ...


1

(Interestingly enough the Greeks had a y/u as the üpsilon letter..) Thycylides did have some idea. Aristoles too and Plato (the rigid old man had his ideas.. but he was too steady-state: forms don't change or evolve, etc.) IT is a Confucian proverb. *The idea of biological "fascism" or dog-eat-dog isn't new. It was obviously a more pessimistic ...


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