New answers tagged

1

The best answer is likely to be a synonym for inventor which you mention in your question. Inventor is probably not quite radical enough for your purposes and would exclude people like Albert Einstein and Paul Dirac whose work, although producing revolutionary changes to ways of thought and enabling others to develop new technologies, did not directly ...


2

From a comment under the question: Although I used a rhetorical question in my example, I did not mean to limit the scope of the answers to only include rhetorical questions. If you are thinking in terms of one person trying to lead another person into reaching some kind of understanding through critical analysis, and doing so by asking questions that ...


1

a pedant: a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of learning. a person who overemphasizes rules or minor details. a person who adheres rigidly to book knowledge without regard to common sense. from the dictionary


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Most of the comments here are totally correct, but perhaps may not be fully explaining the answer to the asker, which is asking for help because they are not native in English. Jalene, I am quite certain there is no term for this. It is just "the first letter of the syllable, as Leo indicates. "onset" is the closest thing ,but that really is a description ...


6

I believe this is called the onset: The nucleus is usually the vowel in the middle of a syllable. The onset is the sound or sounds occurring before the nucleus, and the coda (literally 'tail') is the sound or sounds that follow the nucleus. Wikipedia


1

Storing nuts for the winter is the closest idiom that comes to mind. For some reason, the phrase "putting up (as in 'canning') peaches" popped into my head. Looked around for a literary reference - but, unsuccessfully. Anyone ever heard of this used as a metaphor in this sense?


2

Here is something that seems to fit (also mentioned by @Jalene in comments) - Reap what you sow If someone reaps what they sow, they suffer or benefit as a result of their own actions. Note: To reap a crop such as corn means to cut and gather it. "Parents who neglect their children will reap what they sow." "It seems to me that if we neglect these ...


0

Such a person has a personality disorder and it's impossible to specify which without knowing the person and why they do what they do. Their urges may a symptom of obsessive compulsive disorder, paranoid or immature personality, aggressive behavior, etc. Whatever the cause, we can always affirm that the OP describes a disordered mind. Of course you can ...


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windbag Noun a person who talks too much, and does not say anything important or interesting


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That person could be called an attention-seeker attention-seeking ADJECTIVE Attempting to attract the attention of other people, typically by disruptive or excessively extrovert behaviour. Children who are homesick may engage in attention-seeking behaviour


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A common metaphor would be to say that you are eating your vegetables -- doing something that is not what you prefer in the moment because it will have a good effect in the future.


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Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to reform (or pause and reflect). Mark Twain, From a 1904 entry in his notebook. However, and it's a big however, this quote is almost always used in a manner that would have Twain rolling over in his grave. Here is Twain's concept of majority and minority from his unsent letter to Bayard ...


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I think the best word I could come up with is self-conscious excessively aware of being observed by others. I suppose insecure, anxious could do too. As far as idioms, I would like to refer to this answer.


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Paying one's dues means to put in hard work at a low level, for the promise of something better in the future. It's often thankless, menial, possibly unpleasant work, but it can open the door for more opportunity later on.


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no pain no gain 'used to say that you can only achieve something, for example become fitter, by suffering or working hard' Longman although this is used usually to refer to greater discomfort than "slight".


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A common metaphor is "growing pains". There might be some growing pains, but they will be worth it.


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Obtrusive 1a: forward in manner or conduct //obtrusive behavior //The waiter was attentive without being obtrusive. 1b: undesirably prominent //obtrusive TV commercials “obtrusive,” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/obtrusive. Accessed 1/1/2020. Crass fits, but is pejorative and I wouldn't use the ...


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"Discordant" is a term I might use: not matching other things and therefore strange or unpleasant Macmillan


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You can say that this ( idea/concept) is like a ' Square peg in round hole'


1

The table was groaning under the weight of food prepared.


6

Sounds like a great bounty. What a smorgasbord! A true cornucopia of goodies. A generous feast! All of the above take a somewhat high voice, but that might be appropriate when complimenting such a show of hospitality. To call it an impressive spread might be more casual.


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I created a word for this. "Anti-hypo-causal". Anti = against you, hypo = hypothetical situation, causal = if I have prepared I won't have needed to, if I haven't prepared I would've needed to. I guess in some situations it could be an anti-causal, if it actually happens and it's not hypothetical.


1

argumentative question a question asked by someone, often a lawyer, which is asked as a question but contains a statement and is not really asking for information The prosecutor asked an argumentative question, and it was meant to cause undue embarrassment to the witness. (TransLegal: Legal English Dictionary)


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