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81 votes
Accepted

Does OP mean “original poster” or “original post”?

People all over the Internet have asked the same thing—which, on the face of it, suggests that different forum posters (and perhaps, in some cases, the same people at different times) have used it to ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 164k
27 votes
Accepted

What is the third option beside 'accept' and 'reject' on a ballot?

"Abstain," as you suggest, is widely-understood, at least in the UK. See this Sky News article on the EU withdrawal bill which includes: However, there were still rebels among Labour and Tory MPs, ...
EightAndAHalfTails's user avatar
19 votes

Does OP mean “original poster” or “original post”?

I'm not really sure who is qualified to say that one use or another of this abbreviation is "correct" or "incorrect". But I have certainly used "OP" to stand for "original post" instead of "original ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 82.4k
16 votes

What's the English for "allappare"?

The sensation is said to cause the mouth to pucker. From Up North Again: More of Ontario's Wilderness, from Ladybugs to the Pleiades by D Bennet and T Tiner: Chokecherries are not as dangerous as ...
deadrat's user avatar
  • 44.7k
15 votes
Accepted

Is there any difference between "straighten out" and "sort out"?

In many contexts, idiomatic straighten out and sort out are equivalent and interchangeable. But there's a potential distinction in, for example,... I have to miss my regular "Girsl's Night Out" ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

English equivalent for the French expression "péter de santé"

In English we have an expression that basically means someone is very healthy: "fit as a fiddle" (which if taken literally, brings a strange picture to mind!) According to the website ...
Kristina Lopez's user avatar
12 votes

Does OP mean “original poster” or “original post”?

Either or an abstraction related to both, depending on context. To be clear, "OP" may refer to: the Original Post; or the Original Poster; or the Original Post or the Original Poster, ambiguously; ...
Nat's user avatar
  • 694
11 votes

What is the third option beside 'accept' and 'reject' on a ballot?

You specified MPs, but then asked for "any English spoken country". In the US Congress (and generally in the USA), legislative votes are typically recorded as "Yea" (yes/for passage), "Nay" (no/...
pboss3010's user avatar
  • 344
10 votes
Accepted

Are "in accordance with" and "according to" interchangeable?

According (to) and Accordance (with) are two different words/phrases. They clearly have the same root (Accord, meaning agreement) but they cannot be used interchangeably. According to means "as ...
Joel Brown's user avatar
  • 5,601
10 votes

A word or phrase to refer to restaurant sector?

The term encompassing restaurants, bars, cafeterias, taverns, etc. is "the hospitality sector" or "hospitality industry". This is using the second definition for the word ...
terdon's user avatar
  • 21.8k
9 votes
Accepted

'Using a keyboard is better' v 'It's better to use a keyboard': and why IT with the infinitive?

We often use gerund-participle clauses when we want to use a verb as a Subject: Smoking is bad for you. Using a keyboard is better In English, we don't like to use infinitival clauses as Subjects, ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
9 votes

A word or phrase to refer to restaurant sector?

This is the foodservice industry. From Wikipedia: The foodservice (US English) or catering (British English) industry includes the businesses, institutions, and companies which prepare meals outside ...
Barmar's user avatar
  • 21k
7 votes
Accepted

Why have I not heard "radical muslim terrorism" on TV?

Islamic – adjective Relating to Islam: the Islamic world, Islamic law Muslim – noun A follower of the religion of Islam; adjective Relating to Muslims or their religion. Islamic relates to the ...
TrevorD's user avatar
  • 12.2k
7 votes

"My bad" versus "My mistake"

"my bad" (not only informal but also slang) is used to recognize that you're at fault. "I'm sorry" and "my mistake" convey the same. my bad a way of admitting a mistake, ...
Centaurus's user avatar
  • 50.1k
7 votes

When to use "the" in front of plural demonyms? "Americans" vs "the Americans" vs "the American people"?

First, I must point out that words like Chinese, Japanese, Lebanese, etc. are different from words like Americans, Koreans, etc. in that, when used as "demonyms," the former are much more ...
JK2's user avatar
  • 6,573
6 votes

Is there any difference between ”control of/over“ and ”power over"

"To compete for the control of a corporation" This reads well when it's a person within the company competing in a legal context. Where the competition is about having legal standing to ...
candied_orange's user avatar
6 votes

Désert médical translation

This concept is still too new for there to be a single accepted term. Take a look at this article on CNN: "Millions of Americans live nowhere near a hospital, jeopardizing their lives" The ...
Juhasz's user avatar
  • 7,503
6 votes

"So I have learned."

It’s not so much an expression as a common way to employ so with certain verbs: so, adv. and conj. 4. a. Representing a word or phrase already employed: Of that nature or description; of or in that ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 17.4k
6 votes

"centers around the concept" vs is "based on the concept"?

This is impossible to answer without a concrete instance as the focus of something and its basis are not the same. In addition, saying something “centres around something” is absurd. If it contains ...
David's user avatar
  • 12.9k
5 votes

Ungrammatical or Grammatically Incorrect

"Grammatical" is a modifier. Let's assume someone were to write a scientific article. If the information contained within the article is accurate, but poorly worded, we could say that the article ...
Biff Henderson's user avatar
5 votes

"My bad" versus "My mistake"

I associate "my bad" with sports. In basketball, for example, someone may attempt to make a quick pass to a teammate, but the ball goes out of bounds. Was it simply an ill-conceived pass, or ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 164k
5 votes

Is there any difference between "straighten out" and "sort out"?

Straightening out implies some kinks that need taking care of. The majority of the task has been attempted but there are some issues that need rectifying. Sorting out is used for a new activity. ...
Wes Toleman's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Do we say "as it" or "as if" to say "as it is right now"?

Your as if would be wrong. You mean as is: Do I send it as is?
tchrist's user avatar
  • 135k
5 votes
Accepted

Is "in no way" informal?

"No way" has a long tradition of formality that is recognised as being distinct from current "street talk". The skull shows good development and is in no way artificially deformed ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 42.5k
5 votes

Is it possible to have an interrogative after an imperative connected with coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence?

There is, apparently, no rule carved in stone; rather, what dictates the use of coordination by means of "and" (bar some fundamental and rather stringent requirements as regard to ...
LPH's user avatar
  • 21.8k
5 votes

Is it possible to have an interrogative after an imperative connected with coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence?

Is it correct to say: Please tell us the best choice, and why/why is that? Tell me your name, and where are you from? No. The second clause of both should be expressed as an indirect question: ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 42.5k
5 votes

Is ‘fancy dress’ just a dress?

"Fancy dress" is a British and Australian English term for being dressed as something you are not - being dressed in a costume, such as Wonder Woman or a medieval knight. In US or Canadian ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
5 votes

"centers around the concept" vs is "based on the concept"?

Answer without details No, those expressions are not even variants of one another. Neither is richer than the other but each is consecrated to a unique idea, and so question # 2 is not really ...
LPH's user avatar
  • 21.8k
4 votes

What is an expression for a priest not wearing official attire?

As an Anglican Priest, I generally use the term plain clothes. But rarely is it necessay to explain what I am wearing. Among friends and other clergy, I just say "I'm not wearing my Priestlies (...
Father Ron 's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Be successful vs good luck

"Be successful" sounds like a command - like you are ordering them to succeed. Contrast this with "Good luck!", which means "I hope that you have good luck!". In the latter you're not telling them ...
Max Williams's user avatar
  • 23.1k

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