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26

This is very subjective to what message you want to send across. In a formal setting, you could say "I am very well, thank you." If you'd like to inquire about the other person, you could follow that with "How are you?" or "I hope you are well too." In an informal setting, you could simply say "I am." There is no rule to this. It completely depends on you....


25

I use a P.S. rather often in my emails, when the content of the P.S. is unrelated to the rest of the body of the message. For example, if I was writing two or three paragraphs about a database problem to a colleague, but I knew his wife had been recently released from the hospital, I might end the message with something like: P.S. I hope your wife is ...


25

If you don't wish to use "cc" (as per your comment on Jon Hanna's answer it means something else in your native language) you can just use the verb to copy: 1.3 (copy something to) Send a copy of a letter or an email to (a third party) ‘I thought I'd copy to you this letter sent to the PR representative’ 1.4 (copy someone in) Send someone a copy ...


21

I almost always start formal e-mails with Dear Professor _, I hope this note finds you well. Some guidelines will suggest ending your salutation with a colon rather than a comma, but in many circumstances a comma is acceptable. If the person's title is "professor," you should spell it out (not "prof.") and begin it with a capital letter when it ...


16

It tends to be used as a verb, and abbreviated: I've CCed my manager. Or parenthetically in a sentence about whatever reason you have for saying you've done so. My manager (CCed) will have to approve this before I can proceed. Even if you don't like using such abbreviations, I'd recommend them in this case because I think the metaphor behind the term ...


12

You seem to have answered your own question, but it's perhaps worth pointing out that in both email and conventional mail a postscript can be a consciously chosen device for drawing attention to what it contains. What might look like an afterthought to the reader might be a deliberate ploy by the writer.


12

I will back my statement up based on the fact that I have a bachelor's degree with a minor in English, and that I have a few grey hairs. We must keep in mind that there is no official sanctioning body that dictates how to use commas in a salutation that includes the word "Hello." In my years, I have come across many different interpretations on how to ...


11

I think phrases or labels like In short or In brief may serve better, but if you insist on Latin, in nuce means “in a nutshell; briefly stated”.


10

I believe Hi is less formal than Hello, But if you want to know when to use what ,I prefer Hello for the phone, letters and Hi in face to face conversation or gestures and Instant messages .Rest is really your choice.I remember one time I used Hello in that email at office and my senior advised me to use Hi. I believe he didn't have the reasonable ...


10

For what its worth, this native speaker has never heard of it. I am obviously biased because I am a biologist but to my mind RNA can only stand for ribonucleic acid. As for general usage, this Google Ngram shows that R.N.A.'s popularity peaked in the mid 60s which would imply it is indeed most often used for ribonucleic given the timeline of RNA biology's ...


10

Both can be used in a formal context, but the question is not so much whether you use but or however, but whether you use one sentence or two. That to some extent depends on the style of the rest of the text, but it also depends on the extent to which you want to link failing to consider it as a defect to the understanding of the issue. The main point here ...


10

I'm from the UK and I personally use 'Regards' on its own, like you. Even to somebody I don't know. That's usually for the initial contact type of email, when I'm first raising a subject with somebody. Subsequent responses tend to become less formal, with either a simple 'Thanks' or no ending at all. However, from your list above, I most often see 'Kind ...


9

It depends on the context. Generally, it is uncommon for a professional email to contain an informal greeting, especially when the greeting is multiple sentences long, as you suggested. If you do decide to include it, you should keep it short and to-the-point. Dr. Lastname, // Use whichever greeting you commonly use with this person. It has been ...


8

What's wrong with "I understand." or simply "Understood."? These are perfectly professional but also not stuffy.


8

You should feel comfortable dropping the "I'm not sure" portion. In my experience, I jump right in with "We met at..." plus an interesting tidbit that might remind them of the encounter. This approach is nice and non-commital, it doesn't overtly state that you suspect they've forgotten you, but makes sure they have the info they need.


8

Unlike the well-established norms of traditional epistolary correspondence, there is no single standard way to write an e-mail regardless of the level of familiarity or distance, formality or informality intended, in the English-speaking world. An e-mail chain can be an asynchronous exchange of long form prose, as with a traditional letter or memorandum; in ...


7

I personally think that it is a matter of choice whether you would like to use it or not. I'd say "Much appreciated" is a casual sign-off that should be used for expressing gratitude for favors, like trying to confirm with someone to be a reference for your letter of recommendation or basically asking of someone to do a favor, like babysitting, housekeeping,...


7

"Greetings", by definition, should only be at the beginning of a letter. "Wishes", on the other hand, can go at the end :-) Something I write often is "best wishes from [wherever I'm currently at, if I'm on vacation]" - and such a structure is definitely appropriate at the end of a letter. That said, Jon is also correct that sometimes mentioning where you ...


7

Well, the requested information sounds stilted to me (British English native speaker). I suggest: Open the email with a bit more than 'Hi'. E.g.: Hi, thanks for getting back to me. Rather than 'the requested information', use 'my phone number': My phone numbers are 0000000 (primary) and 0000000 (secondary). Conclude the email with a bit more ...


7

I would recommend "That works for me." or "That sounds good." I would say both of these are one "politeness-level" higher than the two phrases you mentioned. It's fine to use exclamation marks instead of periods here, too.


7

The comma use shown in your first example is correct, the second example is not correct. As noted in Chicago Manual of Style, "a comma is used to set off names or words used in direct address and informal correspondence.


7

There are lots of answers using the verb copy here, but an option you might consider is a more direct comment that someone is included in the e-mail/conversation: I've included my manager in this e-mail/conversation... Or even parenthetically: ...my manager (included in this e-mail)...


6

Hi is slightly too informal for an introductory email.


6

I am not sure what you are trying to convey and who the email is addressed to. But in any case, I would phrase your question the following way to make it less direct. Would you mind telling me when I can get the flyers. Please tell me when I can get the flyers. I would like to know when I could get the flyers. Can you tell me when I will get the flyers. Can ...


6

Hi is informal and Dear . . .. is formal, but Sir is formal and Junior is informal. It follows that Hi Sir and Dear Junior are mismatched. (I have to qualify that by saying that I can’t imagine anyone addressing anyone else in writing as Junior, but that is perhaps because it’s not used in British English.)


6

If he is knighted, it would be Dear Sir Robert, Otherwise you would use any of Dear Sir, Dear Mr. Dowry, or if you know him well or are American, Dear Robert,


6

In your specific case, I would use 'our'. As you stated, it does sound more collegial and inclusive. (And you're copying your teammates on the message.) Our is appropriate for situations when you are communicating with someone else on the same team/in the same organization, when you want to be inclusive, and when you want to exhibit participatory leadership ...


6

You could say: My apologies, but I don't believe we've met. Before we proceed further, could you please verify that I'm the person you meant to contact?


6

Most of the emails I receive do not use Dear, although as noted in my comment all letters that I received do use Dear. emails tend to start with 'Jeremy' if they are from people who email me frequently, and with 'Dear Jeremy' or 'Dear [family name]' if they do not. I think that the absence of Dear in emails is comparable to the language used in pre-email ...


5

Entirely up to you! "Regards" is the most formal, "Best regards" the least formal, and "With Regards" somewhere in between.


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