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146

It is a smiley:☺. What does "J" mean in e-mail messages? Answer: If you've ever received an e-mail with a mysterious "J" in the body of the message, you may have been perplexed by its meaning. Some messages have a single J, while others have several. Most J's appear at the end of sentences, but they can appear anywhere in the message So what does ...


68

Back when typewriters were in common use and photocopiers were rare, one kind of paper you used to be able to buy actually came as two or more sheets stuck together at the top with carbon paper between each sheet. This way you automatically had multiple copies of whatever you put on the paper. This was commonly used to save typing work for office memos, but ...


30

Something like this? Dear Mr Jones, I'm John Smith, a code monkey, and I work with Phillip in the IT pit. He suggested that you might be able to help me hack into Accounts and give myself a raise. It would really help me in my new project - P0232 - Theft for Fun and Profit. I'm free for the rest of the day because I'm pulling a sickie. ...


25

I use a P.S. rather often in my emails, when the content of the P.S. is unrelated to the rest of the body of the message. For example, if I was writing two or three paragraphs about a database problem to a colleague, but I knew his wife had been recently released from the hospital, I might end the message with something like: P.S. I hope your wife is ...


24

If you don't wish to use "cc" (as per your comment on Jon Hanna's answer it means something else in your native language) you can just use the verb to copy: 1.3 (copy something to) Send a copy of a letter or an email to (a third party) ‘I thought I'd copy to you this letter sent to the PR representative’ 1.4 (copy someone in) Send someone a ...


21

Dear is a perfectly appropriate letter greeting in all circumstances. However you do need a noun to follow. "Dear, " on its own doesn't work. The standard opening if you don't know enough about the reader is "Dear Sir/Madam," Note that when used to open a letter, dear is an adjective: Dear Mr Smith, Dear Susan, Dear Sir/Madam, Dear is also ...


21

I almost always start formal e-mails with Dear Professor _, I hope this note finds you well. Some guidelines will suggest ending your salutation with a colon rather than a comma, but in many circumstances a comma is acceptable. If the person's title is "professor," you should spell it out (not "prof.") and begin it with a capital letter when it ...


21

This is very subjective to what message you want to send across. In a formal setting, you could say "I am very well, thank you." If you'd like to inquire about the other person, you could follow that with "How are you?" or "I hope you are well too." In an informal setting, you could simply say "I am." There is no rule to this. It completely depends on you....


16

It tends to be used as a verb, and abbreviated: I've CCed my manager. Or parenthetically in a sentence about whatever reason you have for saying you've done so. My manager (CCed) will have to approve this before I can proceed. Even if you don't like using such abbreviations, I'd recommend them in this case because I think the metaphor behind the term ...


13

I always thought it was "carbon copy" (and upvoted that answer) but I just read a letter to New Scientist http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21028171.200-cc-all-readers.html saying otherwise. The letter-writer points out that Latin used double letters for plurals, a habit that came into academic English -- pp for pages and LLB for the degree Bachelor of ...


12

You seem to have answered your own question, but it's perhaps worth pointing out that in both email and conventional mail a postscript can be a consciously chosen device for drawing attention to what it contains. What might look like an afterthought to the reader might be a deliberate ploy by the writer.


11

Our tech magazine switched from e-mail to email (and from e-book to ebook) within the past year, over the vigorous opposition of the copy editors. The copy editors' position was that e-mail preserves the special status of the "e" as the sole surviving remnant of an entire word (electronic), as do the spellings A-bomb ("A" for atomic), B-boy ("B" for break),...


11

I think phrases or labels like In short or In brief may serve better, but if you insist on Latin, in nuce means “in a nutshell; briefly stated”.


10

"Sirs" is just completely wrong. If you are addressing more than one man, it would be "Gentlemen".


10

The Oxford English Dictionary definition 1c of the verb copy includes: to provide (someone) with copies of correspondence, etc., on a particular subject for information. (Common in office use.) The entry has this supporting citation from a novel published in 1983: LaSalle pushed a file jacket across the table, and Harper flipped through the pages....


10

I believe Hi is less formal than Hello, But if you want to know when to use what ,I prefer Hello for the phone, letters and Hi in face to face conversation or gestures and Instant messages .Rest is really your choice.I remember one time I used Hello in that email at office and my senior advised me to use Hi. I believe he didn't have the reasonable ...


10

For what its worth, this native speaker has never heard of it. I am obviously biased because I am a biologist but to my mind RNA can only stand for ribonucleic acid. As for general usage, this Google Ngram shows that R.N.A.'s popularity peaked in the mid 60s which would imply it is indeed most often used for ribonucleic given the timeline of RNA biology's ...


10

Both can be used in a formal context, but the question is not so much whether you use but or however, but whether you use one sentence or two. That to some extent depends on the style of the rest of the text, but it also depends on the extent to which you want to link failing to consider it as a defect to the understanding of the issue. The main point here ...


10

I'm from the UK and I personally use 'Regards' on its own, like you. Even to somebody I don't know. That's usually for the initial contact type of email, when I'm first raising a subject with somebody. Subsequent responses tend to become less formal, with either a simple 'Thanks' or no ending at all. However, from your list above, I most often see 'Kind ...


9

It really depends on how eager you wish to seem. If you don't mind coming off a little strong, it's fine. But you could convey nearly the same level of enthusiasm by simply saying "I look forward to hearing from you." That is only if using eagerly would make you seem too desperate.


9

Between those two sets of choices specifically, the first is correct. However, using 'our side'/'your side' isn't the part that's wrong in the second examples, it's the preposition: you can be at an end, but you are on a side. So you could say "Everything is fine on our side."


9

It depends on the context. Generally, it is uncommon for a professional email to contain an informal greeting, especially when the greeting is multiple sentences long, as you suggested. If you do decide to include it, you should keep it short and to-the-point. Dr. Lastname, // Use whichever greeting you commonly use with this person. It has been ...


9

I will back my statement up based on the fact that I have a bachelor's degree with a minor in English, and that I have a few grey hairs. We must keep in mind that there is no official sanctioning body that dictates how to use commas in a salutation that includes the word "Hello." In my years, I have come across many different interpretations on how to ...


8

Dear / Hi John (Use "Dear" or "Hi" depending on how professional your relationship is) In regards to our recent correspondence as seen in the email trail below, please would you be so kind to let me have your feedback? Your assistance herein is greatly appreciated. OR Id like to close finalise this matter and your feedback will be of great assistance. ...


8

“To find x y” is a common construction in English, though it usually takes an object pronoun: I find him quite dashing. I find myself lost for words. This presumably comes from a shortening of “to find that x is y”. I think that analysis applies equally well to “find x enclosed/attached/herewith”. I think we can attribute the fronting of the ...


8

Like the link FumbleFingers posted, it's indeed a graphic, though not a smiley. The capital P in the font Webdings appears to be a river through a field with a tree in the distance. However, if you don't have the font installed or the font has been stripped (due to plain text emails or what have you) you just see P


8

I wouldn't. It sounds like half your sentence is missing. But you could alter the construction slightly to say: If you could, please ask her to send me a copy. The comma is key. It's shifting the emphasis from "It would be great if..." to a more request driven, "If you could, please..."


8

What's wrong with "I understand." or simply "Understood."? These are perfectly professional but also not stuffy.


8

You should feel comfortable dropping the "I'm not sure" portion. In my experience, I jump right in with "We met at..." plus an interesting tidbit that might remind them of the encounter. This approach is nice and non-commital, it doesn't overtly state that you suspect they've forgotten you, but makes sure they have the info they need.


8

Unlike the well-established norms of traditional epistolary correspondence, there is no single standard way to write an e-mail regardless of the level of familiarity or distance, formality or informality intended, in the English-speaking world. An e-mail chain can be an asynchronous exchange of long form prose, as with a traditional letter or memorandum; in ...


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