47

The answer to the question “Is ‘his husband’ valid?” (in the English language) is “Yes, yes it is” — although as the OED notes, the word husband was historically... Used exclusively with reference to mixed-sex marriages until the late 20th cent., and in this context taken as correlative to wife. So that must be how you were thinking of it. However, we’re ...


33

inflation with pride of prosperity It is most likely an OCR error concerning an exotic fl ligature being interpreted as ri -> inflation. This maybe due to poor inking of the top left quadrant of the ligature in the original, or poor thesholding during the OCR. In either case this would lose the upper branch of the f, but the dot being the f terminal serif ...


24

The Oxford English Dictionary in its revision of March 2012 defines it as: That may be customized; able to be changed to suit the requirements of the user. Frequently with reference to computer software and hardware. The earliest citation is from 1960. If that definition of customizable suits your purpose, then there’s no reason why you shouldn’t use ...


23

According to dictionary.com, The meaning of these temporal labels can be somewhat different among dictionaries and thesauri. The label archaic is used for words that were once common but are now rare. Archaic implies having the character or characteristics of a much earlier time. Obsolete indicates that a term is no longer in active use, except, ...


22

It is a word that has become established in one variety of English (Indian) but is more or less unknown in other dialects of English. That is really all that can be said.


20

Eric Raymond, The New Hacker's Dictionary, third edition (1996) has the following entry for troll, covering its then-current meanings both as a verb and as a noun: troll v.,n. {From the Usenet group alt.folklore.urban} To utter a posting on Usenet designed to attract predictable responses or flames. Derives from the phrase "trolling for newbies" ...


19

In certain jurisdictions (27 countries in June 2018), same-sex marriages have the same legal status as different-sex ones. In these, which include the United Kingdom, in which Cambridge Dictionaries is based, a woman may therefore have a wife, and a man a husband. 27 countries where same-sex marriages are legally recognised


16

Scofflaw is a possibility: A contemptuous law violator Merriam-Webster.com


14

It appears to be an obsolete rare term. Fom the OED Online: Psithurism (rare) Whispering; a whispering noise, as of leaves moved by the wind. 1872 M. COLLINS Pr. Clarice II. xix. 218 Psithurism of multitudinous leaves made ghostly music. 1875 Blacksmith & Scholar (1876) II. 12 The wind wooed them with a whispering psithurism. Psithurism(plural not ...


13

I'm British - and definitely getting to be the wrong side of "middle-aged", which may have a bearing. But so far as I'm concerned, slut primarily means the first definition in OED... - a woman of dirty, slovenly, or untidy habits or appearance Nor do I disagree with their second definition... - a woman of a low or loose character; a bold or impudent ...


13

'Kissing cousins' in reference works Reference works vary considerably in how broadly or narrowly they understand the term kissing cousins. On the one hand we have this entry from Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1997): kissing cousins Two or more things that are closely akin or very similar. For example, They may be made by ...


13

Words are things people say or write As Lewis Caroll so famously wrote: ’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves             Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves,             And the mome raths outgrabe. Or as another English don would later pen to everlasting fame: In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. The ...


13

Its earliest attestation appears to be from the early ‘90s, but its usage probably dates earlier: Troll: The internet sense (everyone seems to have his own definition of it) seems to date to the late 1980s or early 1990s and the Newsgroups era, and the verbal use is perhaps older than the noun. It seems to combine troll (v.) in the "fish with a moving ...


13

You're thinking of "turn him on to," as in "My friend turned me on to DJing." turn (someone) on to (something) (MWD) to cause (someone) to use or become interested in (something) for the first time


11

As there is the verb to pronounce from French prononcer and Latin pronuntiare, there is no need to coin a second verb from pronunciation. To pronounce has been in use for over 500 years, so a second and longer verb is unnecessary.


11

She seems, in a word, to be insubordinate, both to policy and regulation and to her superiors. not obeying, or not showing respect to, someone who has authority over you source: Macmillan


11

The term I would expect to be used for such a person is prima donna. : a person who thinks she or he is better than everyone else and who does not work well as part of a team or group (Source: Merriam-Webster) If instead, you want to emphasize her lack of regard of workplace order, I would suggest insolent. : rude or impolite : having or showing a ...


10

One needs to understand that a lot of this has to do with the advancing tide of universal public education in the US. Some public schools were developed in the mid to late 1700s (Benjamin Franklin had a hand in starting one), but the movement really gained steam in the early 1800s. (Horace Mann was a well-known advocate, and, as a result, has nearly as ...


10

EDIT @John, it's a case of widespread misuse. In the United States, both "homeopathy" and "phytotherapy" have their definitions established by their respective organizations. The regulation of homeopathy, however, varies widely throughout the world and, for this reason, there are quite a few non-standardized definitions. In addition, it's also natural ...


10

They are exclamations. Exclamation: a word that expresses sudden pain, surprise, anger, excitement, happiness, or other emotion: "Ouch," "hey," and "wow" are exclamations. (Cambridge Dictionary) Usage: Exclamations (also called interjections) often stand on their own, and in writing they are usually followed by an exclamation mark rather than ...


10

Aren't they interjections? According to the Wikipedia article, this category includes exclamations and hesitation markers as well.


9

Based upon my inability to find it in a dictionary, I would say no. Biasedness is not a word. Biased: containing bias or showing prejudice does not really lend itself to a modification by degrees using the suffix -ness. Rather, you would modify by comparison saying: more biased or less biased. His opinion seemed more biased than that of his opponent. ...


9

Customarily, a word enters a dictionary when the lexicographers involved deem the word to have met their dictionary's criteria for inclusion. These standards can change from dictionary to dictionary, but the Oxford English Dictionary's explanation is pretty typical: The OED requires several independent examples of the word being used, and also evidence ...


8

For a general audience, the language of Plato is ancient Greek, as distinguished from the Greek of the prehistoric, medieval, and modern epochs. To be more specific, you can call it classical Greek, which refers to ancient Greek as spoken during the classical era of the 5th and 4th centuries, as opposed to the archaic Greek that preceded it and the ...


8

The earliest substantial English text is Cædmon’s Hymn, generally dated to 657-684. Here’s a ‘normalized’ text from a Harper College professor’s website. The interlineated ‘translation’ is my own using modern descendants of the OE forms where I recognized them; these are boldfaced. (My genitives aren't always in the original; they're just there to help the ...


8

I think you are right that this word was meant to draw attention to itself. It amuses. The entire article is quite tongue-in-cheek — or even sword-in-cheek. Or perhaps even something-else-in-cheek, given how it starts and ends: Sex and sword swallowing beg some pretty obvious comparisons . . . and exactly how you get something so long and hard down ...


8

Look at the spelling pronunciation key for dictionary.com. This tells you what all these strange spellings mean. Dictionary.com uses a non-standard phonetic respelling. You can also get the IPA (international phonetic alphabet) pronunciation by clicking the IPA/Spell button.


8

Linguistically, they can be called vocables: a sound that is used in a particular language, especially one that is not considered a word, for example a sound such as "la" used in music or an exclamation such as "huh" (Cambridge Dictionary). Another word which may be a little bit more recognizable outside of a linguistics context is vocalization/...


8

Actually Lexico defines chortle as “Laugh in a noisy, gleeful way.” and Dictionary.com points out that: There are many different kinds of laughter. There’s the kind that leaves us clutching our bellies and gasping for air, and there’s kind that barely escapes our lips in restrained titters. The chortle, defined as “a gleeful chuckle,” falls somewhere in ...


8

Spelling and pronunciation do not necessarily correspond to one another in English. This difference of spelling emerges in the early modern period. Victuals (OED) has had a number of spellings in Middle English, usually with vit- or vyt-. These spellings were closer to the Anglo-Norman spelling vitaile. As Middle English spelling is largely phonetic, forms ...


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