41

Whateverize is always a word Yes, of course versionize is a “real word” — and no disparaging remarks about its parentage should be made in polite company. This is because ‑ize is a productive suffix in English that’s used to produce a new verb from various nouns and adjectives. That means that any word derived by combining an existing one of those using ‑...


23

Crucify originally had a distinct etymology from the others Crucify comes from Latin crucifīgō with the present infinitive crucifīgere and the supine crucifixum. It means "to fix to a cross" not "to make into a cross". It ends in -fy in English because we got it through French; the OED says more specifically that it is from "Old French crucifier (12th cent....


21

"Untap" does not seem to be a commonly used word. Most dictionaries I've looked at do not have an entry for a verb untap, although they do for the adjective untapped, which is actually an antonym of "unleashed." I think "untapped" is commonly used in the collocation "untapped potential." It's similar to how unopened exists as an adjective, but there is no ...


18

Interesting question! Here's what the OED has to say about -ious: a compound suffix, consisting of the suffix -ous, added to an i which is part of another suffix, repr. Latin -iōsus, French -ieux, with sense ‘characterized by, full of’. ... by false analogy in cūriōsus curious (from cūra): see -ous suffix. and, re: -ous: Nouns of quality from ...


18

"Searchability" is correctly formed, although not common. The Google Ngram Viewer shows some minor usage in recent years (the rate of increase seems to grow a bit with the advent of search engines in the 1990s). The suffix -ability is reasonably productive in modern English, which means that it can be used to form new words. It is used to derive ...


13

The two adjectival forms: geometric, electric geometrical, electrical But the 2nd form is closer towards forming adverbs geometrically, electrically Some words skip the 1st form altogether, so that these words are not used or rarely used whimsic, theoretic Some words tend to discourage the use of the 2nd form fantastical Anecdotal evidence would ...


12

There's a lot going on here. Both verbs have an un- prefix, in the sense of 'remove'; unleash means 'remove the leash' and untap means 'remove the tap'. In either case, some encumbrance is released. If you untap a container of fluid, the fluid comes out; if you unleash a dog, the dog is freed. So far, so much the same. However, tap and leash are also ...


12

Their name (comma) presiding. Ideally just after naming the thing that they're presiding over. Like the title of a book and it's author, it's likely to be on the next line or at least in a smaller font (also, center justified and with less space between the two, which I can't do here). Name of the Event Mr. X, presiding. Address by Mr. ABC, ...


11

It is most likely that "abolition" is the more common form due in large part to its association with the "abolition movement". France was one of the earlier countries to abolish slavery within its borders, and Société des amis des Noirs was one active group in the movement in France. The picture on that web page refers to (pardon my French) L'Assemblée ...


11

I don't know of a form of preside that meets your needs here, but I'm not sure this is a word choice problem. The other examples on the schedule indicate actions with defined beginnings and endings relative to the event. The whole event will, presumably, be presided over by Mr. X, or at least the portions that come after the address and inauguration. So if ...


11

There was a noun (synonymous with refutation), but it was never very popular, so it died out. For example: We finde no concurrent determination of ages past, and a positive and undeniable refute of these present, the affirmative is mutable.   Pseudodoxia Epidemica


10

Although irritancy certainly exists as a noun, something that is irritating is normally referred to as an irritant or an irritation — or less commonly and usually with a human agent only, an irritator. (lifted out of ephemeral comments) I haven’t found any dictionaries that yet contain irritance, although there do exist published books that happen to use it....


10

Hadeocentric As Earth to Gaea gives geocentric and Jupiter as Jove gives jovicentric, so too does Pluto to Hades give hadeocentric. Hades was the Greek god of the underworld, the Roman Pluto. The word hadeocentric is based on the pattern of choosing Greek prefixes for words like heliocentric, geocentric, areocentric — which, for whatever reason, have won out ...


9

According to the definitions laid out here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_prefixes: prefix description example de- reverse action, get rid of deemphasise un- reverse action, ... release from undo, untie For this reason, both are semantically valid, since both prefixes state that the verb is to be reversed, ...


9

I find both unhighlight (and dehighlight) on-line with substantial use and both sound fine to me. Because un- is a standard prefix that can be applied to a wide swath of words and generally be readily understood, dictionaries won't include many (most?) un- words, even well attested ones, unless their un- version has become lexicalized and has shades of ...


9

Accumulatory appears to qualify as a "word", in that it is used in serious publications. Cholescintigraphy (1981): For each study two functional images are generated, i.e. accumulatory phase (upslope) and excretory phase (downslope),for the Diethyl-Ida turnover. Rethinking Feminist Interventions Into the Urban (2013): In Kingston, safety from ...


9

Perhaps you should trust your instincts. If phoenician floats your fictional boat, who are we to say it is wrong? Using phoenician to refer to phoenixes makes just as much sense as using it to refer to people from Phoenix, Arizona... and yet (capitals aside) people do just that, probably as it is intuitive, vaguely pleasing in its (old) Old World ...


8

The best rule I've found? If you can change the word to have "ion" at the end, it is OR. If you can't, it's ER. TeachER (can not be teachion) ConductOR (conduction) ProfessOR (profession) I can't really think of any ER's sorry!


8

The true answer to this question is perhaps best explained by The Ballad of Shameless Enjambment, a cautionary tale here reproduced by kind permission of its author: From far and wide, they’ve come to list-         en, watch, and judge her plea. Beneath the lights her skin aglist-         en drips and drabbles free. Before she speaks she stops to moist-     ...


8

There are some suffixes which can be used in more than one way and might be considered false diminutives. I admit I'm still not 100% clear on what you mean by this term. Here are a couple of examples. -ette (or -et) is often used as a diminutive suffix (kitchenette, cigarette) but could denote a feminine form (suffragette or majorette) or something that is ...


7

James Fernald, Funk & Wagnalls Dictionary of English Synonyms, Antonyms & Prepositions (1947) distinguishes between the adjectives effective and efficacious (and effectual) as follows: That is effective which accomplishes an intended effect with emphasis, decision, and certainty; that is effectual which acts with such finality as to leave no more ...


7

(The key elements of the answer to this question are given in the comments following it. This answer ties them together and adds some more detail.) If you look at a fuller range of examples— calf, calve; grief, grieve; half, halve; life, live; proof, prove; safe, save; serf, serve; strife, strive (with some meaning drift); thief, thieve; advice, advise; ...


7

Something that is characterized by keys is keyed. There are precedents for using this word in class names, for example, the .NET KeyedCollection.


7

Tiger, Tiger: Symmetricity, Symmetricality, or Symmetricalness? It doesn't really matter whether this or that dictionary includes or omits it. It is the regular product of applying productive derivational morphology to a basic English word for conversion purposes. It doesn’t matter whether you use symmetricity, symmetricality, or symmetricalness — any native ...


7

What types of words end in "-onian"? My understanding is that words ending in "-onian" have various sources, but it is extremely uncommon for -onian to be used as a simple derivational suffix that can be added to a name of any sort to make an adjective. Usually, a word ending in "-onian" is based on a stem that ends in "-on" (or sometimes "-o"), so the ...


7

Simple Explanation The easy answer is because read is a Germanic verb, whereas all those others come from Latin verbs — and indeed often enough from actual Latin nouns like English conjugation < Latin conjugatio. Latin never had a *readatio noun, and thus neither does English. It did, however, have lectiones that were read by lectors. The word lection ...


6

OED has thesaurus noun Etymology:  Latin, < Greek θησαυρός a store, treasure, storehouse, treasury. 1. Archaeol. A treasury, as of a temple, etc. 2.   a. A ‘treasury’ or ‘storehouse’ of knowledge, as a dictionary, encyclopædia, or the like.   b. A collection of concepts or words arranged according to sense; also (U.S.) a dictionary of synonyms and ...


6

The pronunciation with the 't' is a hypercorrection. Although the 't' was long ago pronounced, it has been silent for centuries and is only recently making a comeback because people assume that not pronouncing the 't' is erroneous. It makes sense that it would be silent, by analogy to similar words that lose their 't' sound when -(e)n is added ('soft'/'...


6

Majoring in languages and linguistics in college, I had one linguistics professor who was exceptionally adamant that often should not be pronounced with the t. That was a spelling pronunciation that had begun in the first quarter of the 20th century when greater access to schooling and literacy became available to children and adults. Often should be ...


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