73

Why sure you can, and indeed you have just done so! I really cannot imagine what it is that makes you think you cannot do what you have just yourself done. Do you mistrust your own eyes? What’s the source of your afraidness here regarding fast-pacedness? Perhaps it’s just its nonceness or ad-hoc-ness, its brand-newness or its yuckiness, or even its ...


46

-ess is, in fact, a feminine suffix. The male or neuter form (English tends to conflate the two) would be tempter. As a note, the title The Tempter, with capital letters, is given to the Devil. A person who tempts in a sexual fashion might be called a seducer (seductress if female).


41

Whateverize is always a word Yes, of course versionize is a “real word” — and no disparaging remarks about its parentage should be made in polite company. This is because ‑ize is a productive suffix in English that’s used to produce a new verb from various nouns and adjectives. That means that any word derived by combining an existing one of those using ‑...


27

A mythological creature called succubus is described as the ultimate temptress, using sexual seduction to lure its prey. The male counterpart, incubus, similarly uses sexual seduction to lure in prey. These terms can be used to describe seductive people whose ultimate goal is self-serving or else makes no consideration for the wellbeing of the person being ...


23

Crucify originally had a distinct etymology from the others Crucify comes from Latin crucifīgō with the present infinitive crucifīgere and the supine crucifixum. It means "to fix to a cross" not "to make into a cross". It ends in -fy in English because we got it through French; the OED says more specifically that it is from "Old French crucifier (12th cent....


21

"Untap" does not seem to be a commonly used word. Most dictionaries I've looked at do not have an entry for a verb untap, although they do for the adjective untapped, which is actually an antonym of "unleashed." I think "untapped" is commonly used in the collocation "untapped potential." It's similar to how unopened exists as an adjective, but there is no ...


19

Interesting question! Here's what the OED has to say about -ious: a compound suffix, consisting of the suffix -ous, added to an i which is part of another suffix, repr. Latin -iōsus, French -ieux, with sense ‘characterized by, full of’. ... by false analogy in cūriōsus curious (from cūra): see -ous suffix. and, re: -ous: Nouns of quality from ...


18

It felt wrong because -able forms adjectives from transitive verbs — doable, drivable, killable, reversable, callable, wearable. But respond is not a transitive verb. Find a transitive synonym, and then slap the -able onto it. For example, answerable, fieldable, addressable, handleable, acknowledgeable.


18

Consider sadist: Psychiatry. a person who has the condition of sadism, in which one receives sexual gratification from causing pain and degradation to another. a person who enjoys being cruel. Source: Dictionary.com Also, Psychopath: A person suffering from chronic mental disorder with abnormal or violent social behaviour. Source: ODO I ...


18

"Searchability" is correctly formed, although not common. The Google Ngram Viewer shows some minor usage in recent years (the rate of increase seems to grow a bit with the advent of search engines in the 1990s). The suffix -ability is reasonably productive in modern English, which means that it can be used to form new words. It is used to derive ...


15

Here's an obscure word (and it's a mouthful), because you've added the tags for obscure terms and derived terms: Epicaricacist, formed from epicaricacy -- Wiktionary From Ancient Greek ἐπιχαιρεκακία (epikhairekakía, “joy upon evil”). noun 1. (rare) Rejoicing at or deriving pleasure from the misfortunes of others. The word is mentioned in some early ...


14

The two adjectival forms: geometric, electric geometrical, electrical But the 2nd form is closer towards forming adverbs geometrically, electrically Some words skip the 1st form altogether, so that these words are not used or rarely used whimsic, theoretic Some words tend to discourage the use of the 2nd form fantastical Anecdotal evidence would ...


14

I can think of lots of possible alternatives, e.g. alacrity, briskness, dispatch, haste, hurry, hustle, etc. However I don't think that is what you are asking. fast-pacedness sounds okay to me. I wouldn't want to overuse it though. Notice that conventionally the pronunciation would change so as to clearly pronounce the "ed" syllable. The original ...


12

If you mean bad financial or professional decisions, the word you're looking for might be charlatan: A person practising quackery or some similar confidence trick in order to obtain money, fame or other advantages via some form of pretense or deception. (Wikipedia) A similar word is huckster: A pejorative for a person who sells something or serves ...


12

There's a lot going on here. Both verbs have an un- prefix, in the sense of 'remove'; unleash means 'remove the leash' and untap means 'remove the tap'. In either case, some encumbrance is released. If you untap a container of fluid, the fluid comes out; if you unleash a dog, the dog is freed. So far, so much the same. However, tap and leash are also ...


12

Their name (comma) presiding. Ideally just after naming the thing that they're presiding over. Like the title of a book and it's author, it's likely to be on the next line or at least in a smaller font (also, center justified and with less space between the two, which I can't do here). Name of the Event Mr. X, presiding. Address by Mr. ABC, ...


12

There are a few paraphilias that end with the greek suffix -lagnia. This is actually hard to look up because the dictionaries only consistently list one as far as I can tell, that is algolagnia. algolagnia n. Sexual gratification derived from inflicting or experiencing pain. al′go·lag′nic adj. al′go·lag′nist n. American Heritage Dictionary n (...


12

From the four criteria considered to be the common characteristics of adjectives (CGEL § 7.2 p. 402), can be concluded that "believed" tends towards the status of a full adjective but that its use is subject to much idiomatic constraint. A) attributive function: Yes but rarely unmodified and if so noun sensitive¹ B) predicative function: Yes but ...


11

It is most likely that "abolition" is the more common form due in large part to its association with the "abolition movement". France was one of the earlier countries to abolish slavery within its borders, and Société des amis des Noirs was one active group in the movement in France. The picture on that web page refers to (pardon my French) L'Assemblée ...


11

I don't know of a form of preside that meets your needs here, but I'm not sure this is a word choice problem. The other examples on the schedule indicate actions with defined beginnings and endings relative to the event. The whole event will, presumably, be presided over by Mr. X, or at least the portions that come after the address and inauguration. So if ...


11

There was a noun (synonymous with refutation), but it was never very popular, so it died out. For example: We finde no concurrent determination of ages past, and a positive and undeniable refute of these present, the affirmative is mutable.   Pseudodoxia Epidemica


10

The best rule I've found? If you can change the word to have "ion" at the end, it is OR. If you can't, it's ER. TeachER (can not be teachion) ConductOR (conduction) ProfessOR (profession) I can't really think of any ER's sorry!


10

The true answer to this question is perhaps best explained by The Ballad of Shameless Enjambment, a cautionary tale here reproduced by kind permission of its author: From far and wide, they’ve come to list-         en, watch, and judge her plea. Beneath the lights her skin aglist-         en drips and drabbles free. Before she speaks she stops to moist-     ...


10

Although irritancy certainly exists as a noun, something that is irritating is normally referred to as an irritant or an irritation — or less commonly and usually with a human agent only, an irritator. (lifted out of ephemeral comments) I haven’t found any dictionaries that yet contain irritance, although there do exist published books that happen to use it....


10

My suggestion would be "Lothario" "a man who obsessively seduces and deceives women." http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lothario?s=t


10

Hadeocentric As Earth to Gaea gives geocentric and Jupiter as Jove gives jovicentric, so too does Pluto to Hades give hadeocentric. Hades was the Greek god of the underworld, the Roman Pluto. The word hadeocentric is based on the pattern of choosing Greek prefixes for words like heliocentric, geocentric, areocentric — which, for whatever reason, have won out ...


9

According to the definitions laid out here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_prefixes: prefix description example de- reverse action, get rid of deemphasise un- reverse action, ... release from undo, untie For this reason, both are semantically valid, since both prefixes state that the verb is to be reversed, ...


9

I find both unhighlight (and dehighlight) on-line with substantial use and both sound fine to me. Because un- is a standard prefix that can be applied to a wide swath of words and generally be readily understood, dictionaries won't include many (most?) un- words, even well attested ones, unless their un- version has become lexicalized and has shades of ...


9

Accumulatory appears to qualify as a "word", in that it is used in serious publications. Cholescintigraphy (1981): For each study two functional images are generated, i.e. accumulatory phase (upslope) and excretory phase (downslope),for the Diethyl-Ida turnover. Rethinking Feminist Interventions Into the Urban (2013): In Kingston, safety from ...


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