108

German is from the Latin word germani; unlike the similar-looking demonyms Englishman and Frenchman, it is etymologically unrelated to the word man and does not form a plural the same way.


82

The noun for an inhabitant of Britain is Briton. British is an adjective. For many countries, the adjective and noun are identical. As you've found, German and American are good examples. The noun for an inhabitant of China has historically been Chinaman but in recent times, the word Chinese has been increasingly used.


75

My choice would be Lunarian—employing the same Latin roots as Martian and Venerian, using the same way to build the word. It is actually already existing term as per Marriam-Webster (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lunarian).


63

I would use Solarian which appears to be the latin demonym for denizens of the sun as pointed out in the comments. Wiki It also follows nicely in the footsteps of Martian, Venusian, and Jovian, which are the most common terms for the hypothetical inhabitants of Mars, Venus, and Jupiter respectively. As for the usage in science fiction as pointed out in the ...


45

Jap (as a derogatory term for Japanese): The term Jap was a neutral demonym in the late 19th century but it got pejorated during the WWII. In America, the term Jap came into wide use in 1860 to refer to the members of the Japanese embassy to the United States (see "Japs in 19th-century popular usage"). In newspapers, magazine articles, and ...


39

Your dictionary may list British and Chinese as nouns because they are used as collective nouns, to refer to the population of each country as a whole or as a generalization: The British are mad about football (soccer). Compare with Americans are obsessed with football (not soccer). The British is really just a short form of The British people, ...


36

H.G.Wells, in The First Men In The Moon, referred to the inhabitants of the moon as selenites, but the name doesn't seem to have caught on. The only definition I can find for the word in a dictionary refers to a kind of gypsum.


32

Next to "Solarian," you might want to consider Helian. HELIAN from Greek helios (Sun) + suffix -ian A learned synonym for the term solarian - it is derived from the higher-status Greek, not from the lower-status Latin. The term is indicative of its user's erudition. Digital Commons @ Butler University heliacal: relating to or near the sun M-W So ...


22

I know Indians and they prefer to be called Indians. Their reservations have names like Navajo Indian Reservation. Any office or bureau for them would have the name Indian in it. Here is a good article that discusses the Indians’ own preferences about what they would like to be called — and not called. So not only is it not offensive but it’s actually ...


22

Sometimes, there are phonological rules that tell you what the sound change should be under a modifications. But here it just seems to be a historical/cultural choice, not uncommon in English, to choose a alternate, classical derivative for that slot (the adjective version/demonym of a place name): Rhenish: "of or belonging to the Rhine" (especially of ...


17

via the Latin Luna, I suggest Lunans Lunans (Luna: Earth II) Loonies (from the book The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Heinlein) - however being loony is considered a little crazy Lunar is the adjective: "The Lunar inhabitants", but lunatic is an informal term referring to the mentally ill Lunan will be more readily understandable by anyone not Greek than ...


14

Amerinds (three syllables) or Amerindians: another term for American Indian, used chiefly in anthropological and linguistic contexts Note, for example, the Amerind Museum, founded by the Amerind Foundation. The longer "Amerindian" has also been widely adopted in English-speaking South American nations. For example, it is the official term used by the ...


14

According to the resources I checked, two derogatory slang terms used specifically in reference to Japanese (and Japanese American) people were popular during and after World War II, both involving shortenings of longer words: "Jap" (from Japanese) and "Nip" (from Nippon). There seems to be some disagreement about which term was then ...


13

I suspect that the answer is that, for historical reasons, there are a large number of people of South Asian origin in the UK and many fewer of any other sort of Asian origin. 4.9% of the population in the 2011 census described their ethnicity as "Asian or Asian British" and chose the subcategory Indian, Pakistani or Bangladeshi, and a further 1.4% chose "...


13

The problem is that sometimes there is an easily available adjective form but not an easily available noun form. This is also complicated by the fact that we can form a collective noun from an adjective by adding the definite article, such as the rich or the famous. Now British, English and Welsh are adjectives, and we can certainly talk about the British, ...


12

Honestly if I were writing about a fictional people that lived on the moon I would take a different approach. What would they call their home? What would they think of the blue giant "moon" hanging in the sky above their planet? If they did not come from the earth then surely they would not call their home planet the moon... Will they have water and grow ...


12

I decided to search for three forms on the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA). Here's what I found: First, I searched for un-american. This search was not case-sensitive. There were 560 results, and in 560/560, the 'A' in un-American was capitalized. (Well, 559/560, but when I checked the actual source of the odd result out, it turned out to ...


11

Those of us who live in these offshore islands often have some difficulty in describing ourselves. We can say that we’re British (although some residents of Northern Ireland may have a problem with that), but there’s no ready equivalent of the sentence She’s an Australian. She’s a Briton is just about possible, but sounds contrived. Britisher might also be ...


11

Objectively, the inconsistency between rendering national proper names as adjectives (British and Canadian) and using a state proper name (Colorado) as is in the same syntactical position is difficult to justify. But in the United States, there is a very strong tendency to reserve use of the adjective form of a state name for situations specifically ivolving ...


11

I think Solarling or Sunling would be interesting, seeing as we are called "Earthlings". It'd be a nice name for a race a bit on the "cuddly" or more "familiar" side, though, as the name gives the connotation of that- which I doubt is what you are going for.


10

Spanish is an adjective, so no article. A Spanish man is a Spaniard. Note that for many other nationalities, the form of the adjective and the noun is the same: American, an American German, a German Italian, an Italian Russian, a Russian Chinese, a Chinese Japanese, a Japanese Greek, a Greek I have a feeling that for most nationalities the adjective and ...


10

Indigenous people. If you want to be more concise (and sensitive), you'd need to know their actual tribe (they probably have a separate language). Some examples Dine, Cherokee, Ojibwe.


9

"While the Canadians" may not always require the definite article, there are over 10,000 written instances showing they're quite capable of taking it on board. We British, on the other hand, can only do without it in constructions like that (where "We..." effectively stands in for "We, the..."). It's probably connected to the ...


9

Wiktionary gives Rhinish as an alternative form for Rhenish. There are also Rhenian, Rhenic and Rhenane. According to Wiktionary the etymology is: From Rhine +‎ -ish (with the first element taking a Latinate form; see Rhenus). So just in general I guess many words aren't intuitively inflected. The adjective for Wales is Welsh. The adjective describing ...


9

A Google ngrams search shows that the term was rare until the late 1930s and its use fell off very rapidly in the late 1940s. It had a small revival in the late ’70s and early ’80s, when Americans began to fear that Japanese businesses were out-competing them. A search of the examples in the Google Books corpus shows that most examples before the 1920s are ...


8

Going by the official website of Shreveport, shreveportla.gov, the demonym appears to be Shreveporter. An excerpt from the city's council proceedings in 2007 reads: Councilman Shyne: Mr. Chairman, I saw a distinguished attorney just come in. I don’t know whether he wants to be recognized or not. That’s Attorney Jones. He’s a distinguished Shreveporter. We’...


8

There are in fact very few cases where the customary demonym is root + -man— those you have named plus Irishman, Norseman, Welshman, Scotsman, and (obsolete, now considered offensive) Chinaman, and maybe a few others in Britain like Yorkshireman or Cornishman. In the absence of a more established form, the demonym is usually the same as the adjectival form. ...


8

There isn't a standard. You just have to memorize them. :) On the one hand, you have: Stratford-upon-Avon Stoke-on-Trent On the other, you have: Kingston upon Hull Newcastle upon Tyne In the cases of lesser-known towns, the dashed approach seems to be used far more commonly when the town's name features a preposition, such as the examples below. This ...


8

When I find multiple conflicting usages, I like to see what other people are using. The NGrams data clearly shows a vast preference for Nigerien. A slate.com article which claims to have verified its facts with the Nigerien Embassay in the US says What do you call someone who hails from Niger? Old-schoolers (and, in what an editor there called "something ...


8

Yes, you can say "a Chinese" but yes, it sounds at least a little weird to many people most of the time. This is discussed in Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'? I'd recommend using the adjective "Chinese" instead it in situations where it is easy to do so, but the noun "Chinese" can be used when necessary. You can see this use listed in a ...


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