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91

Circa: (written abbreviation c); (ca) (used especially with years) approximately: He was born circa 1600.


39

While it's difficult to prove a negative, having grown up speaking English and being fairly well-read, I feel safe saying: No, there is no commonly used word for this that would immediately be understood by the majority of people.


32

I don't know whether historians use it in this way, but one of the many uses of the tilde (~) is "approximation". Robinson discovered the island in ~202 BC. would therefore be read/understood as Robinson discovered the island in approximately 202 BC.


21

From Etymonline: The -ber in four Latin month names is probably from -bris, an adjectival suffix. Tucker thinks that the first five months were named for their positions in the agricultural cycle, and "after the gathering in of the crops, the months were merely numbered." If the word contains an element related to mensis, we must assume a *...


17

The Oxford English Dictionary prepends the letter c to indicate an approximate year: c1400 (▶?c1380) Pearl a quotation from a manuscript of around (= circa) 1400 preserving a text probably composed around 1380. (The symbol ▶ preceding a date indicates that this is a date of composition, not a manuscript date.) This is also used in the Middle English ...


14

Three-letter abbreviations are more common, but two-letter ones are also fully understandable. In a tabular calendar, even one-letter abbreviations are acceptable, since the position is sufficient to disambiguate the S's and T's.


13

Another variation I have seen (and used) is (starting with Sunday): Su, M, Tu, W, Th, F, Sa In other words, single letters for unambiguous days, two letters for the ambiguous ones.


13

Answer The "to" in today means "on." Today means "on (this) day," tomorrow means "on (the) morrow." "On" is used for days and dates, not times or parts of the day, so no tonoon or toevening. I've been looking for an explanation of prepositions as they relate to time. The best I could find have been the rules without explanation. [edit] At first glance, ...


10

A possibility would be to call it a "transposed" birthday.


9

I have this dated 1787, culled from the online Felix Farley's Bristol Journal (Bristol, England), Saturday, November 3, 1787; Issue 2036. 17th-18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers [accessed 2018-12-11].


9

If historians are uncertain about the date, is there a simple and short notation they can add to the date, to indicate the uncertainty? I'm looking for something like this, but more professional: Robinson discovered the island in 202 BC (?). Yes, there is a symbol and it is (Ahem......) (?). Your use of (?) is professional and correct. According to Sussex ...


8

For a person for whom both dates are known, use the form “1923–2003” (preferably, per CMS, with an en dash, not hyphen, double hyphen, or em dash); for one still living, just write “b. 1923.”


8

There are multiple ways to do this. TVTropes has plenty of examples. Some works use an em dash: On a fine May day in 197—, Fred Regent and Richard Jeperson stood in Old Compton Street, London N1. Soho Golem by Kim Newman Another way (very popular in video games) is to use X: The year is 199X — Earthbound The Oxford English Dictionary uses ...


8

In my experience as a native speaker of American English, the date is sometimes spoken as all numbers, particularly when reading a date written that way. However, it's in the format "two thirteen", where the first number is the month and the second number is the day. In addition, sometimes a third number (the year) is included, either by saying the entire ...


7

Last month is normally used to refer to the month before the current month. Previous month is normally used to refer to the month before a month that is being spoken of. Thus you have something like "It rained a lot in March but not as much as in the previous month" referring to February.


7

Bryan Garner, Garner's Modern American Usage, second edition (2003) has a useful entry on this matter: DATES. ... B. Month and Year. February 2003 is better than February of 2003. Stylebooks have long agreed that no comma should appear between the month and the year. Among the mountains of evidence that might be amassed are these sources: The Washington ...


7

The crime (or misdemeanor) of drunk driving—and use of the term drunk driver to characterize an offender guilty of it—evidently goes back in some municipalities to the days of the horsed carriage. From "Police Courts: Friday, July 22: Perth," in the [Perth, Western Australia] Inquirer and Commercial News (July 29, 1898): A Drunk Driver.—Charles Hillman ...


6

All your examples are all acceptable: it is not normal practice to use leading zeros. I would, however, suggest prefixing (or suffixing) all of them with AD before (or after) the digits (especially so where you omit "the year"). I believe (but have not confirmed) that it is conventional to include "AD" for years of less than 4 digits (unless it is obvious ...


6

In a business sense, the phrase "by May 30th" usually means "by close of business on May 30th" (i.e. the end of the business day, typically 5:00 PM in the English speaking world), while the same statement on a legal contract could have the meaning "by 11:59 PM on May 30th" (i.e. the end of the calendar day). So I would say there is an element on contextual ...


6

I don't think there is any significant difference.


6

As a tongue-in-cheek in joke, I'd call this a: UK Birthday - if you're normally using mm/dd/yyyy and transposing it to dd/mm/yyyy. U.S. Birthday - if you're normally using dd/mm/yyyy and transposing it to mm/dd/yyyy. These aren't widely used or 'correct' by any reasonable way, but in a joking sense I think a friend or colleague would get what you're doing ...


6

The tilda ' ~ ' is used to express an approximation: Robinson discovered the island in ~202 BC. = Robinson discovered the island in approximately/about/ in some year close to 202 BC. (See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilde) The question mark is used to give a date which is, in the view of the writer, probably correct but over which there is some doubt. ...


5

Forget about prepositions and use an adverb. "The date is exactly MM/DD/YY", for example. As you say yourself, the best thing would be to just drop the word completely. "The date is X." GUIs should follow the rules of the language, not the other way round. Oh, and also, the GUI doesn't actually say, "The date is...". It only says "is", and "published ...


5

Mrs. Claus introduced this terminology in 1987 SANTA: Not so merry. The elves are behind and it is Christmas Eve. MRS. CLAUS: Yes, last night was Christmas Eve Eve. And the night before that was Christmas Eve Eve Eve. And the night before that was Christmas Eve Eve Eve Eve SANTA: I know dear. MRS.CLAUS: My favorite is the day ...


5

Another way to avoid ambiguity is to use a 24 hour clock. Midnight between Thursday and Friday is 2400 Thursday, and 0000 Friday.


5

Using 'of' is the standard form in Britain and those countries who speak the Queen's English. In spoken form 'the sixteenth of July' is used as frequently as 'July the sixteenth'. What we don't say in Britain is 'July sixteen'. When writing we do not include 'of' nor 'the'. But a lot of people, me included, place 'th', 'st', 'nd' or 'rd' after the digits. ...


5

Preferring your middle, unambiguous example of 3 Jan 2013, it would be quite natural to drop the year. | Date | Name | | ----------- | ---- | | 03Jan – 09Jan | John | | 10Jan – 16Jan | Jill | | 17Jan – 23Jan | Mark | It's quite easy to add in a 2-digit year when the date range spans over the year end. | 28Dec13 – 01Jan14 | NewGuy | These ...


5

On is the only correct preposition here. In is not used to indicate a specific date, no matter what the format. If you look at the edit history of the Wikipedia page, though, you’ll see that there was originally no date. It originally read: It was released in February 2010 for Microsoft Windows, and in March 2010 for Xbox Live. Since this is not a ...


5

Until x means that the change occurs on/at x: I am here until Friday. | From Friday I will not be here. or I am playing football until 7pm. | At 7pm I finish playing football. or The store is closed until March. | In March the store opens. In your example: I am out of the office until Thursday. | From Thursday I am back in the office.


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