Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
23

The symmetrical term is valediction, but I don't suppose it's very much used.


8

"Goodbye" is derived from God be with you, as are many valedictions. "Take care" is sort of threadbare. "Farewell" seems antiquated. "Bon Voyage" is great if you're French. Be well, good fortune, until we meet again I do like the Vulcan Valediction, live long and prosper. Namaste is very respectful. It is spiritual, however; it can be interpreted (roughly)...


7

There are two words in the lingo of aviation radio communication, "roger" and "wilco." The first (named after the name of the letter "R" in the old radio alphabet) stands for "I received your transmission." "Willco" is short for "I have received your transmission and will comply with your order." When your friend replies to a message by saying "...


6

"Attentioned" is not a word. "Attention" is a noun, not a verb. You should say: Send it to [me], to the attention of [my friend staying with me] For example: Send it to MKH, to the attention of C.S. Lewis. Or in a business context Send it to headquarters, to the attention of the Payroll Department.


6

The comma use shown in your first example is correct, the second example is not correct. As noted in Chicago Manual of Style, "a comma is used to set off names or words used in direct address and informal correspondence.


5

You could certainly use acknowledged. You need the past tense form. "Acknowledge" in the present tense will look like a command to the person who receives the email, not as a response. In general, I find if you only say this, it will sound a bit terse and could be taken as rude. Generally, I prefer less formal responses like your example or "OK, got it", "...


4

It’s definitely an error. The only personal pronouns which are capitalised in English are “I” and those referring to God in certain religious traditions. “I” is always capitalised; God’s pronouns are not always treated so.


4

Forget the whole thing. Just write for followed by the name of the person on whose behalf the letter is being signed.


4

The debate is over just how "p.p." should be used: whether before the name of the person for whom the document is signed—let's call her The Principal—or before the signature of the person who actually signs the document—let's call him The Agent The ambiguity arises because "p.p." abbreviates a Latin phrase, per procurationem. It means, ...


4

It is best to reserve the term "letter" for actual paper letters sent by "snail mail" (post). Call an instance of email a "message". (If you simply say "your email" you are not specifying which message; there may have been several.) "Thank you for your message {sent/which I received} on Friday." Or mangle the language and pretend it's AN email. (The ...


3

There are many expressions of felicitations, to wish happiness, congratulations, longevity, success, or encouragement, that can be found in common use and that don't invoke a religious sentiment. I found this link, which seems to illustrate quite a few, some of which I quote here: May you see your children's children. May you be poor in misfortunes ...


3

You should capitalize only the first word in salutation, as in Dear Mr. X My dear Mr. X and also, only the first word of closing Sincerely Very truly yours


3

You always put a comma in a direct adress if you want your sentence to be grammatically correct. Using Commas for Direct Address (i.e., the Vocative Case) When addressing a person or thing directly, the name used must be offset with a comma (or commas if it's mid-sentence). For example: Jackie, are you leaving so soon? (Jackie is being addressed directly. ...


2

Try one of these: Greetings. Hello. Dear members of X team (if this is, say, different people working on the same project).


2

The salutation and closing of a business letter are formulaic sentences, nothing more. That is, there is very little variation in salutations and closings from one business letter to another. But the rules for sentence construction, capitalization, and punctuation still apply. You will normally see the salutation and closing capitalized because they are ...


2

Unless you knew him personally, it would certainly not be appropriate in the UK, and I imagine it would not be in the US either. Few men will object to being addressed by a stranger as 'Dear Sir'.


2

Linguistics refers to an element of pragmatics referred to as a "speech act." Speech acts perform some function other than the mere communication of information. An example might be an oath of office, or some other ceremony, in which a pronouncement is made to effect some change. (See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_act.) So it's understandable that ...


2

You can say you concur concur Be of the same opinion; agree. ‘the authors concurred with the majority’ - OLD e.g: I concur with John and the name of the other paricipant...


2

The source shows clearly that the employer desperately needs someone who can improve the quality of its communications. You would show that you are that person by writing in very plain English what you have done and by avoiding, like the plague, the overblown, abstract, management-speak as seen in the job description. "In my project, it was my job to tell ...


2

R Mac suggests in a comment the verb to notarize. That verb describes what a notary does — whatever he does in your jurisdiction. It’s not what the signatory (or signatories) of a notarized document does (or do). The signatories have their documents (or their consent to agreements) notarized. So the request formulation you are looking for, could be: ...


2

They are parties to a contract and, depending on the type of contract, they are called lessor/lessee, buyer/seller, grantor/grantee, etc. They are the potential signatories (in fact, before signing the document, they are not even parties to the contract, because it has not yet been executed and is therefore not effective).


1

From the M-W, acknowledge means to say that you accept or do not deny the truth or existence of (something) to tell or show someone that something (such as a letter or message) has been received E.g. He quickly acknowledges all of my e-mails when he receives them. So, it's correct to say acknowledged when someone asking to confirm something, ...


1

Acknowledge accept or admit the existence or truth of. recognize the importance or quality of. Note notice or pay particular attention to (something). record (something) in writing. Source: Oxford Dictionaries I use acknowledge a lot too :P. When you acknowledge something, you understand the importance and the truth of the fact ...


1

If you don't like "because it's not a problem", then the most idiomatic thing to say would be "because this is not something that needs to be solved". These are your options, really. That's what actual people actually say. Everything else is a theoretical exercise in futility. There simply is no hypernym for everything you can solve. Just like there is no ...


1

You do not need to reply. The email is just their way of saying "we will arrange this time to call you". However, it shouldn't be a problem if you replied with something like "Thanks again for arranging this". Or, "I look forward to the interview, thanks again."


1

These would be letters Machiavelli wrote to friends and acquaintances but not as part of his official duties. You may wish to read Machiavelli and His Friends, Their Personal Correspondence. At the end of the 15th century and the beginning of the 16th, Machiavelli held diplomatic and military posts in the city-state of Florence, working as an official in ...


1

Acknowledgement is recognition of the fact(s) or points as stated. Unless a very legal issue, it should suffice as to be acted upon. Per the military reference, Wilco, is quite specific that the recipient of the communication 'will-comply' with the directive. In business an 'acknowledgment' should be a 'will-comply' and should simply be confirmed as such ...


1

It may be regarded as a bit old-fashioned, but it is acceptable, and perfectly proper. (US)


1

The adverb 'respectively' is far easier to deal with: Anne and Bob own dogs called Xerxes and Yappie respectively. So A --> X and B --> Y where the mapping descriptor here is 'own/s'. (Of course, this may be extended to C --> Z etc.) With the adjective, the A associates (possibly bijectively, eg 'is married to') with X and B associates in the same way ...


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