13 votes

'For' is a coordinating conjunction, but 'because' is a subordinating conjunction. Is that right? Can someone explain why?

It's not surprising you're confused. There really isn't much difference in meaning between for and because here, but there's a difference in grammar, which is why for is traditionally classified as a ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
10 votes

When do I use "I" instead of "me?"

It depends on what you mean by “correct”. As others have confirmed, your method of removing the other coordinated noun phrases, then checking if you have the correct case for the single remaining ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.6k
9 votes

Can "then" be used as a coordinating conjunction?

One of the best tests of a coordinating conjunction is its non-reversible order. We frequently place subordinate clauses beginning with the subordinating conjunction before the main clause, such as: ...
S. Scalf's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Can all coordinating conjunctions be used to connect nouns, adjectives, etc. as well as clauses?

Why FANBOYS is nothing but a facile lie To the best of my knowledge, there are seven coordinating conjunctions.... I’m afraid that your question is based on a false premise. That’s because English ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 134k
6 votes

Which is correct, "you and I" or "you and me"?

The correct phrasing is "between you and me". This brief article does a great job of explaining why. http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/between-you-and-me In standard English, it’s ...
WonderGrub's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Coordinating conjunctions in translation of Kafka

Conveniently, Patrick O'Neill, Transforming Kafka: Translation Effects (2014) presents versions of this famous opening sentence as handled by twelve English translators of "The Metamorphosis"...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
5 votes
Accepted

Does "not" cover the whole sentence?

Some sentences suffer from what is called syntactic ambiguity (see here). This means (roughly) that it is not clear which words go with which other words. The sentence "Johnny is not tall and fat" is ...
DyingIsFun's user avatar
  • 17.9k
5 votes
Accepted

When to use "And" at the start of sentence?

You start a sentence with a conjunction when you want to call a clause out for special emphasis. Examples: We finally won a game against Notre Dame. And our best player wasn't even in the game! ...
Robusto's user avatar
  • 151k
5 votes

Is it possible to have an interrogative after an imperative connected with coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence?

There is, apparently, no rule carved in stone; rather, what dictates the use of coordination by means of "and" (bar some fundamental and rather stringent requirements as regard to ...
LPH's user avatar
  • 20k
5 votes

Is it possible to have an interrogative after an imperative connected with coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence?

Is it correct to say: Please tell us the best choice, and why/why is that? Tell me your name, and where are you from? No. The second clause of both should be expressed as an indirect question: ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 41.4k
4 votes

Singular or plural verb after a list with multiple "every"s?

Every is singular--even when there are many everys. Although the simple answer above was down-voted by someone, consider the scope of quantification of every (or, for that matter, each): Every (man, ...
bigMama's user avatar
  • 49
4 votes

"natural and artificially flavored" or "naturally and artificially flavored"?

The second clause: Naturally and artificially flavored means the food is flavored both naturally and artificially. This is because the word "naturally" is an adverb (because of the "-ly") at the ...
user0939's user avatar
  • 799
4 votes

Can "then" be used as a coordinating conjunction?

This article from Think Map - Visual Thesaurus addresses this issue [the version here slightly reformatted and condensed]: Do This, Then Do That: Coordinating "Then" Usage_ Erin Brenner ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
4 votes

Is it "John or Mary's house" or "John's or Mary's house"?

In my view, this question has three dimensions—one focused on logic, one concerned with style-guide preferences, and one emphasizing real-world usage. The logic dimension As a matter of logic, the ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
4 votes
Accepted

Why is "each row and each column" followed by a singular verb in this sentence?

This is a particular case of compound subject, one or more nouns joined with a conjunction. When compound subjects are preceded by "each", "every", and certain other words, they are rendered singular, ...
remnant's user avatar
  • 1,040
4 votes
Accepted

Is "if you need help or having trouble" correct?

I think the correct form is: If you need help or are having trouble... Think of it this way. Break the two things into separate sentences: If you need help... If you are having trouble... The ...
BevansDesign's user avatar
4 votes

Are FANBOYS the ONLY coordinating conjunctions that can coordinate two independent clauses? Are there any others?

The core of your question seems to be about how subordinating and coordinating conjunctions work with dependent and independent clauses. Here's my take in a nutshell. A subordinating conjunction is ...
Ven Bede's user avatar
3 votes

Would pronouns be objective or subjective in this sentence?

There's a simple reason why subject pronouns like him and me should be objective here. There are, as noted, any number of different ways to report the same proposition. But there is a very limited ...
John Lawler's user avatar
3 votes

Parallelism using "as," "nor," "or," and "neither... nor"

As others have said, your first example does not have the meaning you want, because "it" is not read as a dummy subject. If you leave out the "it", you get something that nearly works ?They say ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 77.1k
3 votes

Which is correct, "you and I" or "you and me"?

I have a feeling that a good many teachers of English grammar did a disservice to their students years ago when they taught their students to say, for example, My girlfriend and I are going to a ...
rhetorician's user avatar
  • 19.4k
3 votes
Accepted

"your grandfather’s and my health" or "your grandfather’s and mine health"?

It should be the first one (and my health), because mine sits in place of a noun (It is not your toy -- it's mine!) whereas my sits in place of an adjective (This is a red car; it is my car.)
jdpipe's user avatar
  • 214
3 votes

"production and incorporation of X as Y 'have' or 'has' been widespread"?

This is somewhat complicated, actually. I'm inclined to use has here. A question about a similar situation, -ing nouns and verb agreement, has unfortunately been closed. The answer to the supposed ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.6k
3 votes

When there is more than one conjunction in a sentence linking a set or list of nouns or verbs, are commas used?

Absent a prescriptive rule, I would follow the lead of influential writers, like David Foster Wallace in Infinite Jest (page 4): chat together about your application and potential recruitment and ...
RaceYouAnytime's user avatar
3 votes

"Fish and meat gives..." or "Fish and meat give..."?

Fish and meat give us protein. [plural] Jack and Jill go up the hill. [plural] Jack and Jill is a nice story. [singular] Fish and meat is sometimes called "surf and turf". [singular] Conclusion: ...
badroit's user avatar
  • 1,210
3 votes
Accepted

In this example, is the correct usage 'she' or 'her'?

Your construction is a compound sentence composed of two independent clauses: Jenny administers the second high-dose adrenaline shot. She and Bron change places on the table. In the first clause ...
Zan700's user avatar
  • 3,376
3 votes

Can we use "Since..., thus.... as a grammatically valid sentence?

The sentence "Since I have graduated from school, thus I should find a job", sounded a bit odd to my ears. I´d say "Since I have graduated from school I should find a job" would sound better. Though ...
Daniel Tomazi's user avatar
3 votes

Difference between BUT and YET

I think there's a subtle difference, although we don't give it much thought when speaking. I would use "yet" if you're adding an element of surprise. He likes dogs, yet he is allergic. I would use ...
heyitsme's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Comma or no in a two item list where those items are phrases

If the style guide you're using doesn't say otherwise, you may omit the comma if the independent clause is sufficiently short. Here's Kate Turabian on how to use commas in academic writing: ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
3 votes

Who is lost in thought in "I had no glimmer of what was in his mind, nor did he enlighten me, but sat lost in thought..."?

Holmes is the one who is lost in thought. It is unambiguous. "(did not) ... enlighten me" and "sat lost in thought" are coordinated VPs using "but", with the same subject in nor did he enlighten me,...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 17.3k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible