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48

There is nothing ungrammatical about this sentence. It contains a kind of non-sequitur. There are many of these. For example, zeugma involves a kind of non-sequitur. An example of this is as follows. He walked into the kitchen wrapped in thought and a bath robe. Here the zeugma involves the same word (wrapped) first metaphorically and then literally....


36

Strictly speaking, the title sentence is grammatical, but it sounds unidiomatic because there's no connection between the two predicates. To give some similar examples, I am raising money and running for president sounds fine, but I am lifting weights and running for president sounds funny. Similarly, I am tired and thinking in circles ...


11

The first site is wrong: He has been being treated for imbecility for almost twenty years and has not yet recovered his wits. In 2007 he had been being treated for imbecility for ten years and had not yet recovered his wits. He will be being treated for imbecility on Monday when you arrive, and may not be able to greet you. By then he will have been ...


11

Since 1973, the festival has been running every year. Since 1973, the festival has been run by the town's entertainment committee. Both fragments that you wrote are incomplete, but not incorrect, and they can be completed in different ways. In "has been run", "run" is a passive form: (Active) The town's entertainment committee runs the festival. (Passive) ...


11

As with each other answer so far, I’ll confirm that the title sentence is perfectly grammatical. There is no real ambiguity or doubt on that score. In contrast to other answers, though, I find nothing odd, funny-sounding, or unidiomatic about the title sentence. I do not consider it a non sequitur. In the example sentence, “I am tired and thinking in ...


10

Will you need... and Will you be needing... differ in that the second of these is a less direct and hence more polite way to phrase the question. Swan in Practical English Usage (p196) explains it well: The tense can be used to make polite enquiries about people's plans. (By using the future progressive to ask 'What have you already decided?', the ...


9

Short answer: Yes, it's fine. Totally fine. If you're interested: It's the progressive passive; a combination of the progressive aspect and the passive voice. It does have a subject, which is lasers. But being passive the subject is the patient rather than the agent of the verb. There're two passive forms in English. Lasers are used. Lasers are ...


8

It's a little unusual, but perfectly grammatical. It is not idiomatic for your example, but it is in the case when we are talking about somebody deliberately behaving in a certain way over a period. For example: I've been being very quiet this afternoon. He's been being friendly all day. (By contrast He's been friendly all day is neutral: it ...


7

No. To drench is a verb meaning to saturate something with water or make it extremely wet. If you said "I am drenching" that means that you are the active agent causing something else to get wet. For example, it would be perfectly reasonable to say: I just drenched those anchovies in salad dressing. Similarly, where the rain is the agent of the wetting ...


6

The present perfect continuous is, in most cases, used to describe an action that is ongoing: I have been pumping means: "I have pumped, but I'm not done yet; I'm still pumping." By contrast, the present perfect is used to describe an action that has ended: I have pulled up dandelions all day means: "I've spent all day pulling up dandelions, but now ...


6

To begin with the active sentence is not strictly grammatical. It needs to have I have or an it's between and and not. But that is not particularly important as it doesn't affect the main point. Neither of the passive suggestions are fully correct. It should, in my view, be He has been being told a long story by me and it's not finished yet.


5

Past perfect forms, continuous and non-continuous, are appropriate only if there is some implied or explicit reference to one action starting before a past time. Do you really expect me to believe that you were running for twenty minutes flat yesterday? Do you really expect me to believe that you had been running for twenty minutes flat when you passed me ...


4

Yes, the general 'rule' is that stative verbs don't have a continuous form; however, some stative verbs can also function as dynamic verbs. Let's take your examples: wish, feel, hope, guess, love and like. This Christmas, thousands of children are wishing for peace. (Here wishing has a dynamic thrust.) He was feeling my face. ([F]eeling here is examining ...


4

Your examples are good English and sound quite natural. The simple present is used relatively rarely in English. If something happened even two seconds ago, we use the past. "I was really surprised when I saw you walk in this room." Past tense. We use the present for something literally happening at this instant, like "I am happy to see you." You are being ...


4

It is grammatically correct but it has not quite the same meaning as Lasers are used to treat different skin conditions which may just explain the function of lasers. Lasers are being used to treat different skin conditions indicates they are actually in operation.


4

'I have worked here' tells me you have, at some stage in your life, worked 'here'. 'I have been working here', suggests you have very recently been, and probably still are, working 'here'.


4

First point is correct when she is still at it, i.e., still trying to quit that habit. Second point is correct when she has quit smoking and now her trying part is in the past. Both are used interchangeably in everyday speech.


4

The idiomatic way to say this would be to use present perfect instead of present continuous, but with since as the preposition: I have been suffering from [a] fever since yesterday.


4

Both I feel fine and I'm feeling fine are grammatical (although this nGram shows the former is a lot more common than the latter). Swan in Practical English Usage (p455) in 'Present tenses: Advanced points - section 7: I feel / I'm feeling' says: Verbs that refer to physical feelings (e.g. feel, hurt, ache) can often be used in simple or progressive ...


3

These are mostly idiomatic by now. It's rarely a question about actual activity, more of accusation, complaint, exclamation. "What have you done?" is a rhetoric question, "Look what you've done", not requesting information, but more of apology. It's a complaint, often expression of grief, like "How could you?". The focus is on the current state, and effects ...


3

I disagree somewhat with Barrie. For most verbs the simple present can be used only in a habitual sense: Why do you hit him?* is unambiguously asking about your habit, not about this particular instance. Why are you hitting him? or Why did you hit him? would be usual for that case. For some verbs, particularly denoting mental state, the continuous is ...


3

You cannot do that without changing the meaning. The present perfect continuous gives a sense of a continuing thing you've done on and off in the past up until now. The present continuous makes the sentence mean that you are intending to do this activity for the specified time period. In other words: You are going to drink soy milk for 10 years (...


3

Yes, it's grammatical. It's a passive construction in which the subject is lasers. You perhaps meant that there is no agent (we don't know who the lasers are being used by), but that is not unusual in a passive construction.


3

Your textbook is oversimplifying things at best or just plain wrong at worst. To understand which to use in a negative sentence, you need to understand the difference between them in a positive sentence. Present Perfect: She has sung at many opera houses. The point here is that the action I'm speaking of is completed. At some unspecified point in the ...


3

The words on the OP list are: states (know, understand, remember, etc.), general realities (belong, fit, contain, consist, seem, etc.), emotions and wishes (like, love, hate, etc.) Though experienced in a continuous aspect, they tend to transcend present time. Examples: I know 15 digits of pi, because I memorized them in eighth grade, ...


3

In general, you can't replace passive present perfect continuous by any other tense (for some sentences, you can). Consider That bridge has been being repaired for the past ten years. You can't replace it with: That bridge has been repaired for the past ten years. because that doesn't mean the same thing at all. The first sentence means the ...


3

We were playing in the garden from 4 p.m. yesterday. Yes, that is fine. There is no precise indication of when the activity finished but we know it has finished. However there is some ambiguity. We were playing in the garden from (4 p.m. yesterday). [The action is all in the past. We know that it finished before the sentence was spoken] We were playing ...


2

In "At the Back of the Black Man's Mind" from 1906, comes the sentence: "Here, after he himself has given out or started his last song, which is to be taken up by the large assembly of people who will have been waiting to hear his last word or his last groan, his head is taken off and his blood offered to the gods." Link to a Google Books Preview


2

This year has been being great sounds awful to me. It's using the past participle right next to the present participle, and I have never seen this. Been going is better, but has been great so/thus far sounds best to me. In my opinion none of the usages make a projection that the year is likely to continue being great.


2

Murphy actually says in the book (page 22): We use the present perfect simple in negative sentences like these: I haven't seen Tom since Monday. (= Monday was the last time I saw him.) Jane hasn't phoned me for two weeks. (= the last time she phoned was two weeks ago) No further explanation is given, but it is important to understand the ...


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