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etymonline.com says Burgess popularized it, but it was originally used a year earlier by Brander Matthews. used by U.S. scholar Brander Matthews in 1906 in "American Character;" popularized 1907 by U.S. humorist Frank Gelett Burgess. Originally mocking excessive praise printed on book jackets, and probably derisively imitative.


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According to the OED it is: Said to have been originated in 1907 by Gelett Burgess in a comic book jacket embellished with a drawing of a pulchritudinous young lady whom he facetiously dubbed Miss Blinda Blurb. (D.A.) See Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 329. The meaning of blurb is given as: A brief descriptive paragraph or note of the contents or ...


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The OP states confidently in their question Why is “folks” commonly used as a gender-neutral term for “people” when “people” is already gender-neutral? The term folks, originally an Old English term used on both sides of the Atlantic, has not seen a recent surge in popularity because it is a better alternative to the gender neutral people, but because ...


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Since you didn't mention that it necessarily needs to start with ignore- prefix, I think the most appropriate word for it is disregard.


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This is the only way I had come to understand it ... in German. I'm aware that there's a huge difference, but I don't ya'll to remain ignorant of the fact. Latin -ans derives present active participles. Therefore, Latin derived English -ant is a doublette of itself: "partly (in adjectival derivations) continuing Middle English -ant, a variant of -and, -end,...


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Oblivion ( Source: Cambridge Dictionary ) the state of being unconscious or lacking awareness of what is happening around you the state of being completely forgotten by the public State of oblivion The person is oblivious about your presence. The person is in a state of oblivion. You are oblivious to the person


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"Against the odds" means "despite being very likely to fail." It usually implies a situation that's unfavorable to you, like a horse that's "running against the odds." As mentioned in the comments, "Against all odds" is somewhat more common, and implies a more general likelihood of failure. But in a tattoo without any other context, the meaning would be ...


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