303

Well with babies we often say 'to sleep(/be) in the bed with'. As in "our baby sleeps in the bed with us." This extends to adults. Warning... NOTE the use of THE, 'in the bed' is different than 'in bed'!!! Compare 'I was in bed with him' and 'I was in the bed with him'. Would any of the following examples imply sex....? I slept in the bed with him. ...


189

You can use "crash with someone". Example: I had no place to stay so I crashed with her. Although not foolproof, it implies less the act of having sex. Edit: As it's been pointed out, crashing with someone implies some sort of need. You might be too tired to go elsewhere or not have anywhere else to stay. Edit 2: Some variants I can think of are "...


168

CBS Sports has this nice article explaining the origin of the word, including a newspaper snippet from 1909: “Hand-Egg,” Not Football. To the Editor of The New York Times: Football is certainly a misnomer, for the game is played not with the feet but with the hands, and the ball is not a ball but an egg. I propose that the game be played ...


95

It's a football reference. The hat is a football helmet The football is egg-shaped and held in your hands A touchdown is worth 7 points (including the obligatory point-after-touchdown) Urban Dictionary Wiktionary


79

The phrases below are often used when small children sleep with their parents in the same bed. To share the bed together (or) share the same bed To sleep in the same bed If you lack a spare room, and a guest needs to spend the night, you might offer to share your bed with him or her. This is often the case between close friends and relatives. I have ...


79

Conclusion: White in "white lie" is a reference to the perceived moral purity of the lie, an act normally considered immoral. It is not a reference to a race. Sources According to etymonline.com, white as an adjective is from Old English hwit [meaning] "bright, radiant; clear, fair" According to the same source Meaning "morally pure" was in Old ...


73

Joys of going to an all-boy boarding school, field trips, etc. where hormonal kids were occasionally required to share beds at overnight sporting events, etc. The phrase we used then was very effective, and has not been mentioned in this question. I think it is ideal to express 'sharing a bed with no sexual activity'. In the context of a school boys having ...


69

The OED finds usages of "white" to mean good or beneficent going back to Chaucer in the 14th century, and it finds first usages of "black" to mean sinister or evil in the last two decades of the 16th century. Even the latest of these predates the bulk of the Atlantic slave trade by English-speaking slavers. Any linguistic color theory of white and black ...


58

I think that the word you may be looking for could be tenfold. According to Collins (http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/tenfold): adjective: equal to or having 10 times as many or as much ⇒ "a tenfold increase in population" composed of 10 parts adverb: by or up to 10 times as many or as much ⇒ "the ...


55

That word is decuple (Collins Dictionary): verb (transitive) to increase by ten times It can also be used as a noun or adjective.


55

I think most (Chinese) viewers mainly took issue with how the phrase "died like a pig" was translated (as it was taken literally --> "像死猪一样"). While I agree that it is certainly unprofessional to use such slang in an international event like the Olympics, I don't believe it was racist or meant to be highly offensive. Swimmers in Canada often use the phrase "...


53

As a competitive swimmer from southern Ontario, Canada, in the 1970's and 1980's, and a master's runner and triathlete in the 1990's I'm quite familiar with the phrase 'die like a pig' though not with its etymology. Dying at the end of a race means slowing down from painful exhaustion in a way that can't be countered by will power. To die 'badly' ...


48

Best option is to not mention the word "bed" at all -- use "stayed at" or "crashed at" and include the word "overnight" if clarification is needed.


48

It's true that OED's first definition for so-called is just called or designated by that name, but the most recent citation for that "neutral" sense is 1863. So even though OED don't explicitly identify it as dated/out-of-fashion, that's what I would say. The "current" definition is... Called or designated by this name or term, but not properly entitled ...


47

The Oxford English Dictionary attributes the early uses of the phrase to Orlando Furioso, where breaking the mold means basically creating an excellent and beautiful work of nature that is made unique and unrepeatable when the mold is broken. Natura il fece, e poi roppe la stampa. (Ariosto, Orlando Furioso, canto 10, stanza 69.) This is the goodly ...


42

Has "hacker" still a neutral/positive meaning or has it definitely gained a negative reputation? Among the general public, hacker still has a negative connotation. With the exception of "life hacks", a fairly new phenomenon, the most usual use of the work hacker in media is related people who commit crimes by computers or other advanced electronic devices. ...


42

I think the simplest way to emphasize avoidance would be to use the word shun. shun v. tr. to keep away from; take pains to avoid. See TFD Online Note the "take pains" in the definition. It suggests a strenuous avoidance, which should be what you're looking for. Nota bene: To all those who subscribe to the narrow viewpoint that shun is archaic, or ...


41

The only way to do this is to be explicit. Yes, you can phrase it to reduce the connotation but you cannot eliminate it. The only exception is where societal context would strongly suggest you weren't having sex - i.e. "It was horrible, I had to share the bed with my mum" or "they're the kind of hippy household where the baby sleeps with them". If you want ...


38

To answer the origin question: I'd presume it's simply because, in our relatively affluent American society, it's uncommon for folks above the age of puberty to share a bed with anyone they aren't romantically involved with. The main exception I can think of is when sharing a hotel room for economy's sake. So the phrase is rarely needed, hence rarely used, ...


36

I have actually seen witch used in a male sense as well. If we look at etymonline, it gives the following definitions: Witch Old English wicce "female magician, sorceress," in later use especially "a woman supposed to have dealings with the devil or evil spirits and to be able by their cooperation to perform supernatural acts," fem. of Old English wicca ...


35

Increase by an order of magnitude In plain English, if you multiply something by 10, you have increased its order of magnitude by one. More technically, when using the base 10 number system, all numbers can be written in exponential form, such as 1.984 x 103, and if you multiply by ten you merely increment the exponent by one: 1.984 x 104. Therefore, the ...


35

Neither 'like stink' nor 'die like a pig' are necessarily insulting in use with reference to persons, although dying like a pig is clearly something to be avoided. The first, 'like stink', is a common colloquial idiom with sufficient longevity to appear in two McGraw-Hill sources (see below) as well as OED Online: *like stink Inf. rapidly. (As fast as ...


34

If you had meant either … spending the night as a guest at another's home or (being a)n overnight guest then you could use the word sleepover.


34

The word that you want, and that the article should have used, is layperson: noun a person who is not a member of the clergy; one of the laity. a person who is not a member of a given profession, as law or medicine. (Link and definition from Dictionary.com) In this case, we are using the second definition, in the sense that scientists are talking to ...


34

The verb land is a verbification of the noun land. So there is not really any "smoothness" inherent to the word. Sure, a meteorite crashes, collides, impacts, destroys, ploughs into, wrecks land, but in every case, the space rock makes contact with the land. It "lands." On a side note, a plane can land violently, but a meteorite simply 'lands,' unless you ...


33

The answer by @Rhetorician failed to include the actual verb To bunk: To stay the night; sleep: bunk over at a friend's house. which does not exactly meet the requirements of sleeping in the same bed, but if you tell me you are going to bunk over at X's place and I know for a fact that he/she only has one bed, the picture coming to mind is you either ...


32

demerits - Marks awarded against someone for a fault or offense (definition from google).


32

I think the word you want is euphemism. According to Merriam-Webster, euphemism - noun The substitution of an agreeable or inoffensive expression for one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant The expression so substituted It fits all your examples, e.g. "Cautious is just a euphemism for being scared."


30

There is a word "cosleeping" (or "co-sleeping", if you'd prefer) which generally applies to infants and their parents, but seems ripe for repurposing. Alternatively: Cosominating


27

On the quixotic — and the Quijote Is quixotic positive or negative, you ask. An easy enough question to ask, aye. But to answer? To answer is something else. For it is . . . complicated. That’s because a tale as rich as El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha cannot be potted into a single sentence, nor sentiment. It does not admit a simple yes or ...


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