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21

My choice would be: There are many activities, including, but not limited to, running, jumping and swimming. The comma before including shows that a new clause, even if it’s a non-finite clause, is to follow, and the comma before but and after to, indicates a weak interruption to that clause. The comma between running and jumping shows that the two are ...


15

The Chicago Manual of Style notes: Many writers assume—wrongly—that a colon is always needed before a series or a list. [Section 6.65] So dispense with the colon entirely: Is this the one you meant? http://blah.com/somebody/blog/article/foobarbaz.gif Alternatively: Is this the one you meant: http://blah.com/somebody/blog/article/...


14

Below is a copy of an extract from The Punctuation Guide relating to the various uses of a colon. You will see, at the bottom of the first section "Introducing a list" are examples of usage after a single word: "Correct: …" & "Incorrect: …". Similar usage is also shown in the last section "Correspondence", with a colon being used after a ...


12

Wikipedia suggests: A thin space is traditionally placed before a colon and a thick space after it. In English-language modern high-volume commercial printing, no space is placed before a colon and a single space is placed after it. In French-language typing and printing, the traditional rules are preserved. So the answer is: no space before it and one ...


12

English documents written in India often use :-. For example: Tatkal tickets shall be issued only on production of one of the ten prescribed proofs of identity shown under (as mentioned in Commercial Circular No.68 of 2012 issued vide letter No.2011/TG-I/20/P/ID dated 01.11.2012) as per procedure explained below:- The details of medical camps conducted by ...


9

"including but not limited to" is lawyer-speak, and comes from a lawyer's need to make sure that no one can ever, in any way, under any circumstances, think that "including" is all-inclusive. Merriam-Webster online says "including" means "to have (someone or something) as part of a group or total : to contain (someone or something) in a group or as a part of ...


8

Punctuation isn't a matter of grammar, but, as R L Trask explains in his ‘Guide to Punctuation’, The colon is used to indicate that what follows it is an explanation or elaboration of what precedes it. That is, having introduced some topic in more general terms, you can use a colon and go on to explain that same topic in more specific terms. So, ...


7

The enacting formula of UK Acts of Parliaments (e.g. here's a recent example) ends with a colon followed by what appears to be an em-dash. Looking around this page, colon + hyphen appears to be common to a number of Commonwealth and British territories, though there are exceptions to that rule (e.g. Phillipines). Usage in legislation would seem to indicate ...


7

According to this guide, colons can be used for emphasis: The colon can be used to emphasize a phrase or single word at the end of a sentence. Conclusion: This practice can be followed when that single word is at either end of the sentence.


6

Although both are independent clauses, a colon is the more appropriate choice here because a compound list follows the initial proclamation and serves to support its assertion.


6

Many publishers still seem to use commas before quotations, as in your first example, but Larry Trask argued persuasively against doing so: A sentence containing a quotation is punctuated exactly like any other sentence apart from the addition of the quotation marks. You should not insert additional punctuation marks into the sentence merely to warn ...


6

Yes, a semi-colon (;) is half a colon (:) above a comma (,). You Have a Point There. A Guide to Punctuation and its Allies (PDF) by Eric Partridge says: As THE name semicolon, half a colon, indicates, the semicolon comes historically after the colon; but in practice it is more important—at least, in the sense of being more popular. If anybody uses one ...


6

I would definitely use a comma. A semi-colon joins two related sentences and you have only one, albeit long, sentence. If you do do "their heads were crooked" then you do have two sentences, but I would use a period, not a semi-colon. I don't know your experience with English, but rarely do you need a semi-colon. If you have 2 sentences, a period works.


6

Semicolons to separate the chapters, as proposed in another answer, is certainly a valid approach. However, I'd like to answer from a different angle - one that comes from my experience with lists in technical writing, where they are very common. First of all, the right punctuation after "as follows" is a colon. There's no way around that. "Follows" or "...


5

What you have written is incorrect, several times over. First, you never follow a dash with punctuation; it simply isn’t done. Second, you didn’t use a dash there, and you should have done so. These are your three main choices here, with some variation in number 2: Unspaced em dash: You didn’t use a dash there—and you should have done so. (no space) ...


5

Two such punctuation marks together are generally best avoided. You can instead insert a blank line to separate the question from the example, like this: Is it possible for the following sentence to be translated into French? "Hello, nice to see you." Better still might be to write: Is it possible for "Hello, nice to see you" to be translated ...


5

This question featured in chat. If the definition follows immediately, I'd use "as follows:" with a colon. This is defined as follows: (definition follows immediately) If the definition doesn't follow immediately, but after something else, I'd use "below." with a full stop. This is defined below. (Some further discussion) ... (...


5

This question, like all matters of punctuation, is a matter of style, and as such, you should be guided by your manual of style. There are two basic philosophies, close punctuation and open. Roughly speaking, the former advocates placing marks whenever there is an occasion to emphasize the syntax; the latter requires the marks only when unavoidable ...


5

I certainly wouldn't ever punctuate in that way nor, I should hope would I ever write in such a tortuous manner. It either needs to be bullet-pointed, or else written as a piece of prose, with separate sentences for each item. And, as prose, it requires linking syntax. My suggestion would be something like the following. I have also eliminated the ...


5

When you're writing formal text, you generally write in full sentences. No sentences fragments: those are forbidden in formal writing. In this context, colons should only be used after full sentences. If you put a colon after a sentence fragment, it's still a sentence fragment. But it's not any worse than a sentence fragment with no colon. But there are ...


4

I could be wrong about this, but I think the reason you can't use convincing is that it isn't parallel with do in failed to do. If you rewrote the sentence: In just a couple of years, low-carbohydrate diets have accomplished what the government has not accomplished in decades of trying: convincing the public that refined grains are bad and whole grains ...


4

The form with the comma is more normal. But the form with the colon does occur in journalistic writing. The sense it conveys to me is that this sentence is introducing the main topic of the piece: the band Bar. It feels a bit like an MC introducing the main act of the evening "And now we welcome our guests (pause) Bar!"


4

Subtitled: The problem to me seems to be, not the colon itself, but rather the subtitle being an integral part of the title.


4

There is a specialist, conventional use of the colon in the Bible (not just KJV) in rendering the psalms into English. Here the colon separates the two halves of the Hebrew verse: The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures : he leadeth me beside the still waters. He restoreth my soul : he leadeth me in the ...


4

According to Wikipedia, "A full stop ( . ) (British, New Zealand and Australian English) or period (American English and Canadian English) is the punctuation mark commonly placed at the end of sentences." "Full stop" and "period" are two names for the same thing, however it is used. The colon is used to indicate that what follows it is an explanation or ...


4

The simplest and the one I would prefer is to treat it as two sentences: One more thing. Don't tell anyone about our conversation (on the subject of this and that ...) This also gives you the facility to maneuver the second part. Where the second part is short, and more important, use a colon to direct attention: One more thing: don't tell her....


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