67

It probably has to do with the phonetic and metrical properties of "ladies and gentlemen" versus "gentlemen and ladies." Say them both out loud and see which one sounds better to you, intuitively. The metrical pattern of "ladies and gentlemen" consists of (arguably) two dactyls. A dactyl is a group of three syllables where the first is stressed and the ...


53

sense verbs or sensory verbs are generally intransitive: They are: look, seem, taste, feel, smell, and sound. They all can be followed by adjectives. You look good. He sounds terrible. That tastes scrumptious. [all adjectives] the verb go is an action or active verb. Therefore, it needs an adverb: This wine goes well with that cheese. That color goes ...


51

Please call me on this number. You can reach me on this number. Acceptable everywhere, principally used in UK/Australia/New Zealand. Sounds strange to North American ears, but understood. Please call me at this number. You can reach me at 0088000900. Acceptable everywhere, principally used in US/Canada. Might sound strange to English speakers ...


43

The door swings on its hinge. To move backward and forward, especially rotating about or hanging from a fixed point. Turns, as suggested by other answerers, sounds like another great possibility. But a quick look at the actual usage stats brings up something interesting. Here are the top 50 collocations for "the door [v*]" from the Corpus of ...


27

what other kind of student is there? College students. Private students. Home-schooled students. Student drivers. As Keshlam noted in a comment: It says "school students" because if it just said 'students" many of us would indeed translate it as "student drivers." Which is a somewhat different kind of hazard. A car full of school students isn't likely to ...


26

My initial response to this question was . . . "Ewwww. That's just incorrect. It should be well, not good." Then, upon further reflection, I took your premise into account. Is the word go being used as a sensory verb here. I do not believe it is. Rather I think this is merely informal usage of the word good, not the transmogrification of the word go ...


23

What any of us might prefer is immaterial. A short question is one that contains only a few words. A quick question is one which the questioner hopes, perhaps unrealistically, can be readily dealt with. Quick has many meanings, and they are certainly not limited to describing a fast-moving object.


18

OED has a first citation from NY Times, 1950 for... zombify: to transform into a zombie. ...so I don't see why in OP's context he shouldn't say... "I hope that you're not being/becoming zombified by your love of my brain."


17

In that sentence, you would use demand for. You use demand for when some entity has want of a resource, as in supply-and-demand economics. Examples would include a high demand for candy canes at Christmastime, or a high demand for beachfront cottages during the summertime. Demand on is used when a situation is challenging, difficult, or pressure-packed ...


16

An idiom that might suit this situation is that you went above and beyond. I hope this effort goes above and beyond fulfilling that promise.


16

Generally speaking, only the commodity itself is on the market, while the traders themselves and other aspects of the trade are in the market. So one puts one’s pork bellies on the market at the lowest price in the market. in the market : in the position of being a potential buyer <in the market for a house> on the market : available for ...


15

I am editing my comment to address the suggestions in the comments. As the OP and many people mentioned, I would replace the whole sentence with ... there was a power outage ... we lost power The goal is, however, to intervene as little as possible. In the given circumstances, I would use any of the following options. and yesterday when I was ...


14

We should distinguish between different lexical meanings of each word, since each meaning will have different grammatical and semantic requirements. Based on my own understanding, for the basic meaning of "speak" and "talk", "speak" refers to the actual act of saying something, and corresponds to the intransitive version of "say", whereas "talk" refers to ...


14

In fact, they could be used interchangeably, however, "in contrast with" is more common in UK English. Moreover, When we say "contrast with", CONTRAST is behaving as a verb. Example: "He likes to contrast his checkered jacket with plain pants" or "his checkered jacket contrasts with his plain pants." But when we say "in contrast to", it is ...


12

He picked up a quarrel. Is it syntactically correct? Yes, of course. Is it semantically correct? Less clear. Was he a crossbowman who’s spilt his quarrels on the ground? Or was he a short-wave operator trying to tune in a distant channel of people bickering? In either of those cases, sure. But if we’re talking about somebody being quarrelsome and ...


12

JLG's and Billy Moon's answers are spot on. I'd add two things: Your thesis does not contribute to fulfilling the promise, which was fulfilled before you were admitted; it contributes to fulfilling something else. Fulfill is a very potent word, and it defeats its potency to employ it in a context where it is merely a stepping stone toward something else. It'...


12

There's no "rule" here - just established idiomatic norms. 1a - There's no point in going. (most common) 1b - There's no point of going. (non-standard) 1c - There's no point to going. (sometimes acceptable) 2a - Is there a point in his action? (often acceptable) 2b - Is there a point of his action? (non-standard) 2c - Is there a point to ...


12

They do seem interchangeable but to me "expert in" implies doing knowledge rather than knowing knowledge. So "expert in kung fu" is clearly someone who practices kung fu, whereas an "expert on kung fu" implies he knows a lot of about kung fu, its history, etc. Clear as mud, right? My sense too is that "expert in" is used when the knowledge is focused to a ...


12

It comes from "My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen". Titled men come first (My Lords); then their spouses [My] Ladies; Ladies also include non-titled ladies; and finally, untitled men (Gentlemen). Debretts, Preamble Precedents The following list gives the form in which important guests should be included in a preamble in order of precedence: Your ...


11

They are often used as if they were synonymous… But, "a desert island" is "an island which has never been inhabited, which is and has always been uninhabited", whereas "a deserted island" should mean "an island which once was inhabited but whose inhabitants left for one reason or another, whose inhabitants deserted it". Although I am sure that this should, ...


11

I'll propose a blend of the other answers: Since the question mentions Pennsylvania, I'm answering in terms of American English (the only dialect I know ;-) I guess that the author of that sign was trying to communicate, within a specific shape, a group or category for which we lack a conveniently short term. We have the broad category of 'student' but as ...


11

This problem cannot be removed from context and social/historical nuance It can depend, among other things on whether people are immigrants, or whether they are descendants of a landowning class of foreigners e.g. the Anglo Irish. (I have never heard anyone talk about the Irish English.) However the Polish Germans could presumably either be Poles who ...


10

Examples: Sarcastic: Well, this meeting with the boss should be hilarious. Sardonic: Time for the monthly flogging by a twerp in a suit; I'll try not to get blood on the executive carpet. Sardonic humour is mocking, but not necessarily sarcastic; sarcasm is stating a counterfactual, whereas sardony is a moment of grim poetic humour and may or may not ...


10

It used to be the case that there were 'physical students', 'mathematical students', 'philosophical students', and 'historical students'. Somewhere in the middle of the 20th century, these switched to 'physics students', 'mathematics students', 'philosophy students', and 'history students'. Consider the following Google Ngram. I suspect that 'medical ...


10

In everyday usage . . . "Quick question?" is a common expression and is a way for the asker to indicate to the askee that they are asking for a brief moment of their time - implying an "interruption" for a question but that by its brevity, should not take too much of their time.


10

If turns is too bland for you, you could say that it pivots on the hinge. Picking the "right" word depends much on your context, too. "The door swung open" is indeed a very natural way to indicate the movement. However, if you were to, say, describe the appartus of an experiment in a scientific journal, swing might not be the best verb to use; something ...


10

Captain is a verb; and pilot is a possibility too, although that has a specific meaning with regard to ships [a shipping pilot is usually someone who is locally skilled and will successfully negotiate hazards around a harbour]. captain verb [with object] be the captain of (a ship, aircraft, or sports team):    all the boats are ...


10

The sign probably isn't meant to make it more clear what kind of students they are, (I think) it's trying to emphasize to drivers that there are children aboard, and that the drivers should be careful. Think: "students" doesn't really raise too many red flags in your head ("what are these students doing? what are they students of?"). "School students," for ...


10

I realise that in your part of the world, "school" can also include higher education. However, it doesn't in other parts. Here in the UK, for example, "school" means "primary and secondary education". school Pronunciation: /skuːl NOUN An institution for educating children: Ryder’s children did not go to school at all There are a ...


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