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88

I've never heard it, in fact I wouldn't even vocalise it to myself as "notif" if I saw it on a device. I'd just think "I've got a notification" or "which programming language is that, does it mean 'elseif'?". Having said that it could well be current with the hipster/pseudo-cool/trendy crowd who use phrases like "totes amazeballs"; I wouldn't know.


72

My guess is that distro might have been inspired by shortenings like repo[sitory], algo[rithm], memo[randum] &c.


57

Due to the Latin influence, "-o" is a much more natural-sounding ending for a singular noun in English than "-i". My best guess is that this subconsciously affected the coinage.


48

To answer your direct question, no, 'notif' is not used at all in American English (I can't speak to other varieties), in speech. There's a general question here though and that is how, in general, English abbreviations are made. The bulk of abbreviations in English tend to be acronyms, the initials of the words making up the phrase ('USA' for United ...


32

The OE has an extensive entry on the -o suffix ($) which I excerpt here: The shortening of a word immediately after a medial o , and in particular where this occurs at the end of a prefix or combining form, first appears in the late 17th cent. and early 18th centuries, e.g. plenipo n., memo n., and hypo n.1 This probably established an association ...


27

The pronunciation of "distribution" is: dis·tri·bu·tion — [dis-truh-byoo-shuhn] — /ˌdɪstrəˈbyuʃən/ "-stri" would typically be pronounced similar to the beginning of "street" or "stripe". "-stro", on the other hand, would be pronounced similar to the beginning of "strobe" which isn't exactly the same but close enough in American English that ...


23

Native speakers often know nothing about the derivation of words they use. Who knew that raccoon was an Algonquin word? Daily or otherwise frequent encounters with the object referred to by the noun probably has a lot to do with the clipping. A person who has nothing to do with robots (who doesn't make them, who doesn't read sci-fi books about them, who ...


20

According to my chat histories I've used the word "notif" at least 3 times in the last month, and I've definitely used it in real life. I'm also an Aussie, and we like to shorten our words, which I think is totes amazeballs.


18

OED unequivocally derives the first morpheme in “bald eagle” (or “bald-eagle”) from the ordinary sense of bald as “Having no hair on some part of the head where it would naturally grow; hairless.” In the entry for the bird, the following two extracts lead the shortish list: 1692 R. Frame Descr. Pennsylv. 27 The ...


17

It could be characterized as a rebus a riddle or puzzle made up of letters, pictures, or symbols whose names sound like the parts or syllables of a word or phrase [Merriam-Webster] While a rebus often contains images, letters being used to represent syllables is common. [Wikipedia] In particular, the Encyclopaedia Britannica states Literary rebuses ...


15

The earliest attested spelling of the word bald seems to be balled, as you have noticed. According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), "Middle English balled" is "of uncertain origin". However, the use of "bald" to describe animals that have white streaks/spots/markings is attested well before the specific term "bald eagle". So it seems quite plausible ...


14

Native speaker of American English here. "Notif" makes sense as an abbreviation in text, and I've probably seen it in software source code, but I'm also quite sure I have never heard it spoken verbally, even by the various totes amazeballs hipsters I know (granting that I don't know all of the totes amazeballs hipsters). It's an awkward abbreviation in ...


12

If you create a new word, similarity to already existing words makes the difference between "sound good" and "sound weird". "Distro" is very similar to already existing word "bistro". There are also "maestro", "electro", "nitro", "metro", "retro" etc. On the other hand, I don't know any word with singular ending with "-tri". It looks like some plural form (...


11

When did phone start to replace 'phone? Immediately, if not before. Let's just briefly answer the second question and then come back: Is there a term for the phenomenon of an abbreviation becoming a word in its own right? I know something similar happened with facsimile and fax. Clipping. Words get shortened and lose rough edges like pebbles in a ...


10

Yes, sitcom can be considered an acronym. The ODO definition is a bit too restrictive, if you ask me. Compare it to the OED, which has two distinct senses of the word: the first is identical to initialism (i.e., when each letter in the acronym is pronounced individually); the second is: A word formed from the initial letters of other words or (occas.) ...


8

The particular form of word formation is known as clipping. The Wikipedia article is informative, but I'd say needs refining. It does contain a good sub-classification and quite a few examples. And also the definition: In linguistics, clipping is the word formation process which consists in the reduction of a word to one of its parts (Marchand: 1969) ...


7

Logitem is short for Logistic Systems, a company name. It's formed by taking the first and last two morae of the words as they would be spelled in Japanese and combining them: ロジスティック・システム Rojisutikku Shisustemu = "Logistic Systems" ロジ        テム Rojitemu = "Logitem" Note that the final -s is missing in Japanese. In Japanese shisutemu is used for ...


7

It happened with omnibus > bus; taximeter cabriolet> taxi; refrigerator > fridge; and other such colloquialisms. The apostrophe was used to indicate the omission of a letter or letters, then eventually dropped when the word came into more colloquial use, probably because it is not verbalized. According to Google ngrams the use of 'phone' overtook* the use ...


6

Sitcom is defined as a shortening by The Free Dictionary n. Informal. situation comedy. [1960–65; by shortening] Wikipedia A situation comedy, often shortened to the portmanteau sitcom Dictionary.com noun, Informal. 1. situation comedy. 1960-65; by shortening Or as an abbreviation by Oxford Dictionaries Origin 1960s: ...


6

Ultimately, whatever the opinion or experiences of people on this thread, "notif" will be understood by some people and not understood by others. Abbreviations are much more common in written language, and in social media in particular, where there is often a need (or desire) to be terse, due to limited space, character limits, a dislike of typing (or ...


5

This may be generational, but yes, notif is used commonly as a stand-in for notification. I would go so far as to say that notif is the one that most people I interact with use primarily, and notification is the pedantic form, like TV vs television. Note that while notif is a bit more common on social media than it is in spoken language (though I’ve heard ...


5

I am Australian. Until I read this question I had never heard of "notif" as a word at all, let alone one used in spoken English. If I heard it spoken I would probably assume someone had said "motive". If you want to be generally understood, I suggest you not use "notif" in speech. Having said that, I am a programmer, and might possibly interpret "notif" as ...


4

It first appeared in 1988. Sep 1988 : Established Logitem Taiwan Co. Ltd. as joint venture between Osaki International Corp. (current Logitem International Corp.) and a customer firm to perform import/export cargo handling, import/export product sales, etc. in Taiwan. [Source] Logitem is a name, and consequently it may have no meaning at all (...


4

It's a form of contraction: contraction, noun: a shortening of a word, syllable, or word group by omission of one or more sounds or letters or by the reduction of two or more vowels or syllables to one [MW] Specifically, it's a form of apocope: apocope, noun: the loss of one or more sounds or letters at the end of a word The word distro is formed ...


3

Clipping (morphology) — Wikipedia In linguistics, clipping is the word formation process which consists in the reduction of a word to one of its parts (Marchand: 1969). Clipping is also known as "truncation" or "shortening." ... Clipping is different from back-formation – back-formation may change the part of speech or the word's meaning, ...


3

The name of the process is lexicalization. From the full OED... lexicalize - to accept into the lexicon, or vocabulary, of a language. As to exactly when the transitions telephone -> 'phone -> phone happened, I think that's a rather pointless/unanswerable question. Some people might have started using the shortened form almost immediately (and in speech ...


3

Initialism: an abbreviation consisting of the first letter or letters of words in a phrase, syllables or components of a word, or a combination of words and syllables and pronounced by spelling out the letters one by one rather than as a solid word. - AHDEL There is also alphabetism (Farlex Trivia Dictionary): The expression of spoken sounds by an alphabet; ...


3

The shortening itself I would term clipping rather than elision. The use of the definite article with an often altered version of a person’s name (as wonderfully satirized by Rob Schneider as Richard Laymer on SNL, 1990–94) is I think a form of aggrandizement (OED s.v. aggrandize: “4. trans. To cause (a person) [to] appear greater than the ...


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