49 votes
Accepted

Why is quixotic not Quixotic (a proper adjective)?

In a comment posted years ago to the question Why is "biblical" the only proper adjective to not use upper case? I listed some other exceptions to the general rule that the first letter of ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
44 votes
Accepted

WhAt iS tHiS kINd oF caPiTaLiSAtIOn cAlLeD? - random capitalisation or intermittent capitalisation

After digging for a long time, I finally discovered the name of this kind of capitalisation. It's called studly caps or sometimes sticky caps. Studly caps: Studly caps is a form of text ...
Decapitated Soul's user avatar
28 votes

Why is quixotic not Quixotic (a proper adjective)?

As you correctly say, technically words associated with a proper noun should be capitalized. However as time and usage goes on, these words tend to become words in their own right, not associated any ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 25.8k
24 votes

Does the word “uzi” need to be capitalized?

Why is Uzi capitalized? It comes from a name, and people haven't frequently used it in lowercase in publication. First, the name is derived from a person's name. These usually retain their ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
24 votes

WhAt iS tHiS kINd oF caPiTaLiSAtIOn cAlLeD? - random capitalisation or intermittent capitalisation

When used in the context of memes, you can refer to it as Spongebob case. See for example: SpongeBob case — Jo Lokito's blog SpongeBob case — GitHub Rdrr.io — SpongeBob
corvus_192's user avatar
23 votes

When quoting poetry, is it appropriate to place [sic] after a lowercase 'I'?

The purpose of "sic" is to indicate to the reader that the original text has been preserved. There is no need to use it if the reader has no reason to suspect otherwise. Therefore, if you ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
22 votes

WhAt iS tHiS kINd oF caPiTaLiSAtIOn cAlLeD? - random capitalisation or intermittent capitalisation

One name for this case is alternating case. A text converter that uses the form (Alternating Case Converter) explains: The alternating case converter converts text, so as a result the initial letter ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
22 votes

When someone spells out letters in dialogue, should they be capitalized? "P-L-E-A-S-E" vs. "p-l-e-a-s-e"

Whether in dialogue or not, proper naming of a single letter of the alphabet varies by style guide. Options include uppercase, lowercase, in quotes, bold, or italics: Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS) ...
Ellie Kesselman's user avatar
21 votes

Should "japanese" be capitalised when used as an adjective

Generally speaking, nations and nationalities are capitalized. This is always the case with things, like cuisine or history, that are closely associated with the the country. Thus Japanese cuisine (...
deadrat's user avatar
  • 44.7k
21 votes
Accepted

Should apartheid be capitalised?

I would not capitalize "apartheid". None of the dictionaries I have checked capitalize it as a headword (MW, AHD, Collins, Oxford). Capitalization, like punctuation, is one of the less settled areas ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.8k
19 votes
Accepted

Is "Black" correct, incorrect, or could it be used as either "Black" or "black"?

Since you are quoting from what appears to be a U.S. newspaper article, its decision to capitalize black as Black when the word is used as a racial term probably reflects Associated Press style. That ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
16 votes

Is it CoViD? Or COVID? Covid? How should the word be spelled?

Official nomenclature and journalistic practice A recent item by Elisabeth Ribbans, "COVID or Covid? The comfort of pedantry at a time of national crisis," in The Guardian (April 19, 2020), ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
15 votes

In English, are words like 'English,' 'Monday,' and 'January' considered common nouns or proper nouns?

Since you asked for a linguistics answer, here goes. First of all, it's incorrect to assume that linguistics assumes that there are proper noun and common noun categories to begin with, that all ...
Azor Ahai -him-'s user avatar
13 votes

Is Kelvin capitalized?

The confusion here stems from the fact that "Celsius" is not the name of the unit, rather it is a classifier for the unit "degree," of which there is also "Fahrenheit." Because "Celsius" and "...
Azor Ahai -him-'s user avatar
13 votes
Accepted

Name for making the first few words in a chapter small caps?

The name that I'm familiar with (in U.S. publishing) for this style element is lead-in small caps. You can read a discussion of various lead-ins (including lead-in small caps) in an article titled "...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
13 votes

Should apartheid be capitalised?

In the context you have, I would capitalize it, because it refers to a specific period in history. However, if you were to use the word not as the name of a period, but to refer to the phenomenon, ...
Logophile's user avatar
  • 525
12 votes

WhAt iS tHiS kINd oF caPiTaLiSAtIOn cAlLeD? - random capitalisation or intermittent capitalisation

See also the below for non-strictly-alternating capitalization: "Erratically capitalized", as in NY Mag: (The idea, so far as there is one, is that the erratically capitalized line is ...
Cireo's user avatar
  • 312
12 votes

What's the '[sic]' in Newton's quote about standing on giants?

It's an error. Someone revised the page in April 2020 from "standing on the sholders" (Newton's spelling) to "standing on the shoulders", but they left the sic in.
Jessica's user avatar
  • 121
9 votes
Accepted

Capitalising names of geographical/tourist terms

First, this is a matter of style, rather than a grammatical matter. Therefore, there will be differing opinions. Does the publishing firm you are working with on the translations have a house style ...
JLG's user avatar
  • 23.2k
9 votes

Capitalizing a word mid-sentence

I'm afraid not. In standard English a capitalisation is only permitted under the following conditions (according to GrammarBook.com): The first word of a document and the first word after a period. ...
A Lambent Eye's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Should I capitalize Brothers?

I believe you should not even capitalise 'brothers' in 'Wright brothers' (with a possible exception of the title or a section header of your writing). That makes it somewhat difficult to advise on how ...
Řídící's user avatar
  • 2,967
8 votes

use of capital C in the word 'Century'

Here are some style recommendations from various more-or-less influential style guides. From The American Heritage Guide to Contemporary Usage and Style (2005): centuries Centuries may be expressed ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
8 votes
Accepted

What nouns of German origin should be given capital letters?

(1) General concept of nativization Languages have a strong tendency to gradually nativize or naturalize loan words. That means that at first,(i) loan words retain aspects of foreign pronunciations ...
Richard Z's user avatar
  • 2,021
7 votes

Does "Ethernet" need to be capitalised?

Short answer: The word ethernet is capitalized because Ethernet is the currently accepted convention. Longer—but still not entirely satisfying—answer: The reason Ethernet is the current convention ...
cpit's user avatar
  • 514
7 votes
Accepted

Space vs the space

Space has multiple meanings. One is the enormous dark near-vaccuum which exists outside our world, and this is never used with the definite article "the" or the indefinite article "a". It's used like ...
Max Williams's user avatar
  • 23.1k
7 votes

Should I capitalize the acronym of a word?

What you are trying to do is write an acronym (german wikipedia article). When writing a german acronym like you are doing here you normally capitalize only the first letter. It's called a Silbenwort (...
Secespitus's user avatar
7 votes

Why is the "I" in "Indigenous crisis" capitalized?

It's similar to the use of the words Aboriginal and Squatter in Australia. The word aboriginal with a lower case 'a' means 'indiginous' or 'original inhabitant' but 'Aboriginal' with an upper case '...
BoldBen's user avatar
  • 17.2k
6 votes

Should the word "Gentile" be capitalized?

Gentiles are not a specific group. They are everyone who is not Jewish. They do not represent any particular ethnicity, belief system, national group, or ideology — other than being not Jewish. Words ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 71
6 votes

Is writing the pronoun "i" in lowercase a feature of Indian English?

A leading daily in India did decide to use the lowercase 'i' instead for 'I' for a brief period of time. Though I don't find that to be the case now. Facts are as under: The Daily The Times of ...
ARi's user avatar
  • 669
6 votes
Accepted

Capitalisation of uncle and aunt in phrases like 'your U/uncle Bill'

The website http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2014/11/aunt-uncle.html says that the distinction is a matter of style, not grammar. In the article, it quotes the Chicago Manual of Style, which seems ...
Steven Littman's user avatar

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