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It doesn't matter. I'd argue the 1984 title is in more common usage nowadays. However there are many early covers suggesting maybe Orwell himself titled it Nineteen Eighty-Four. I think you can choose whichever you please; however, Nineteen Eighty-Four may sound pretentious today because of its scarcity. My favorite new cover: Penguin Books (publishers), ...


6

Orwell actually called the book Nineteen Eighty-Four, but even that was transformed into nineteen eighty-four on the cover of the first edition — and the figure 1984 appeared as well. There have been many editions, some featuring the title spelled out in words, others using the figures. The 1987 Penguin edition I have, first published by that house in ...


4

In terms of the mechanics of grammar (punctuation) and type-setting styles, the title seems open to different interpretations (each with grammatical or mechanical justification). If we put ourselves in Darwin's context, it is likely that the phrase "the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life" modifies or clarifies "Natural Selection" (by ...


4

I'd suggest you use whatever is on the cover of your book. In this case it's the number in digits. And in this case it's spelled out: Update: According to this Brown University site It says: 29.c. George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four: A Novel printed wrappers, New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1949, Advance Review Copy, First American Edition. ...


4

Style guide preferences on the question of whether to use quotation marks or italics for titles of works vary depending on the guide and on the type of work that the title is associated with. But whatever the type of title, I have never seen a style guide recommend using both italics and quotation marks for the whole thing except in the context of dialogue ...


4

Since "according to Eric Foner in his book Give Me Liberty!" is a distinct clause within the sentence, and given that Give Me Liberty! is the title of a book, it's grammatically correct to enclose the clause within commas. Though it may look awkward, it is perfectly acceptable.


4

According to CMoS and APA (two popular style guides), some lower-level headings aren't capitalised in headline-style. Chicago Manual of Style 16th edition (headings by level): Centered, Boldface or Italic Type, Headline-style Capitalization Centered, Regular Type, Headline-style Capitalization Flush Left, Boldface or Italic Type, Headline-style ...


3

The MLA doesn't have rules on French capitalization. Titles in an original language are kept as is. Titles with a translation follow English rules. The main words of plays in English are capitalized, unlike French. The Merry Wives of Windsor A Moon for the Misbegotten for, can be considered a minor word: that gives us: English: Waiting for Godot French: ...


3

I, Claudius was published in 1934. Although there are quite likely to be earlier examples I can't find any. But there's nothing particularly unusual about starting a sentence (for example the first sentence of a speech) this way. Even the I, robot you're thinking of probably isn't the original. Asimov's editor recycled a title from a 1939 story by Eando ...


3

It is your title, so you can do what you like; there is no "rule" here. For example: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe I think you can make the case that using the definite article tends to emphasize that the story is about a particular (or unique) entity: "The Red Planet in the Sky" implies that there is only one, or you're only writing about just ...


3

At the very least, I will comment on which option makes the most sense scientifically (since both seem acceptable grammatically). On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life Since Darwin is describing natural selection, which is both a means of speciation and a means by which certain ...


3

The phrase through a glass darkly originated in the 1560 Geneva Bible translation of The First Epistle of Paul to the Corinthians, Chapter 13, verse 12. But, the phrase's popularity correlates with the overwhelming influence on English through the centuries of the King James Version (KJV, 1611), which utilized the wording of the Geneva Bible here and ...


2

IT IS VALID BUT ANNOYING ENGLISH TO WRITE LIKE THIS It's ugly (and the longer you do it, the uglier it gets) it loses any meaning conveyed by capitalisation, but when it comes to the writing of words, it's allowed. Most of the time, it would be a bad idea. With more than a few words it so stymies legibility as to be downright rude to the reader. It's most ...


2

If you scroll down to the second page of this link you'll see it's transcribed as... ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES: By Means of Natural Selection, or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. This I think reflects the intended parsing. The basic title On the Origin of Species is supplemented by two possible alternatives... By Means of ...


2

It depends on what you're qualifying as parts of the title vs subtext, with consideration to important words. For the examples you gave, I would use: Captain America (Untold Stories) because "Untold Stories" appears to be a part of the title, and both of those words are significant. Madonna (written by E. Cales in 1998) because the 'written by' is not ...


2

Unless the dispute over the name is an integral part of the work you've been taught, I genuinely don't think it matters; given that the dispute exists, no reasonable instructor would expect you to definitively know which is the correct one, and both clearly refer to the same book.


2

Either or but not both. Also, I would add a comma. David Guggenheim uses the title, "Waiting for Superman." David Guggenheim uses the title, Waiting for Superman. EDIT On reflection I would reserve double quotes for dialog and use single quotes in this situation. New Answer David Guggenheim uses the title, 'Waiting for Superman.'


2

Genuine sounds a bit odd here. When used to describe people, genuine normally relates to their personality, rather than their existence; so the implied opposite to genuine is not fictitious/literary, but rather dishonest/deceitful. “The genuine pioneer’s story” makes it sound like it’s the story of a pioneer with a very pure and honest disposition (rather ...


2

This history of the different editions of the book is interesting: History of 1984 book covers In the 40s, the first american and uk versions, it was spelled out. Then in 50s we started to see the numbers.


2

There are a number of movie musicals with exclamation marks in their titles - for example, Oklahoma!, Girls! Girls! Girls!, and Oliver!. You couldn't list these without commas between them (otherwise it would appear as though there were three movies called Girls!), so your use of a comma in the context you describe seems perfectly acceptable.


2

The golf rule is definitely "Played As It Lies".


2

This web page says that for MLA, you should cite French titles using the French capitalization (of which there are two systems). In this case, both systems give the capitalization En attendant Godot. This example from the MLA gives an Italian title for which only the first word is capitalized. This blog entry details the two systems in more detail. The ...


2

The first line in Wikipedia's page for Nineteen Eighty-Four reads as follows: Nineteen Eighty-Four, often published as 1984, is a dystopian novel published in 1949 by English author George Orwell. On the title page of my copy of Orwell's book the words are spelled out and initial-capped—but as you can see on the above-linked Wikipedia page, the publisher ...


2

That would be a BMI of max. 9 (one digit); it has to be less than 10 (two digits). "Single-digit" refers to the entire term "body mass index" (BMI).


2

A UK style guide's advice The Oxford Guide to Style (2002) addresses this problem as follows: Occasionally it may be necessary to indicate italics in text that is already italicized, especially in titles or foreign text. In this instance the opposite font—roman type—is chosen: [Relevant example:] La Physiognomie arabe et le Kitâb al-Firâsa de Fakhr al-Dîn ...


1

I believe that "Likeness" here means "a representation, picture, or image, especially a portrait". So the title refers to the idea that the book presents portraits that "speak" through stories. This belief is supported by the fact that the title page of the book reads: Speaking likenesses/ by Christina Rosssetti; With pictures thereof by Aurthur ...


1

I would say yes, correct, if that's the literal name of the book.


1

Expanding on Helpful's helpful answer - I would use document formatting as well if possible to differentiate titles from other info, e.g.: Captain America (Untold Stories) Madonna (written by E. Cales in 1998) My Summer Vacation (With My Family) Or, add quotation marks: "Captain America (Untold Stories)" "Madonna" (written by E. Cales ...


1

On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life was published in London by John Murray in 1859. As you can see from the title page reproduced at Wikipedia, the title appears in all-capital letters in at least five different font sizes: the largest font is used for the words "THE ...


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