51

Collocations modifying photo often don't refer to the photo as a physical object. They instead refer to the subject of the photo, or what's depicted in the image. To demonstrate this, here are the most common collocations for ____ photo according to the Corpus of Contemporary American English. I have bolded the ones that describe the image (source, subject,...


45

You'd most often use a noun for the person (eg runner, jogger) and then an adjective to describe them (keen, avid). So you might call them an avid runner or a keen jogger.


27

nude ADJECTIVE ... 1.1 [attributive] Depicting or performed by naked people. ‘she won't do any nude scenes’ Lexico


24

It’s a way to refer to photos with nude subjects. As you can see from Ngram this expression took off from the ‘60s/70s when pictures portraying nude people, generally women, started to become popular; the same expression was used earlier referring to paintings Nude: (of a photograph, painting, statue, etc.) being or prominently displaying a ...


20

It is a "fish and chip" shop, but you order "fish and chips". Or just a chip shop since they always sell fish too. In general, a shop selling a product refers to its product as a collective noun in the singular. Chip shop — sells chips. Cake shop — sells cakes. Curtain shop — sells curtains.


12

I think Mike C. has a great answer, but if you'd prefer a noun version over an adjective, I would call the person a running enthusiast A person filled with or guided by enthusiasm. Enthusiasm, of course, being: Intensity of feeling; excited interest or eagerness. So a running enthusiast is one who is excited about running or eager to run.


10

It happens fairly often in English that an adjective is "transferred" from one subject to another, even when it doesn't strictly speaking apply to the latter, provided it is still relevant (in some sense) to the latter. This often begins as a mild figure of speech — see https://www.thoughtco.com/transferred-epithet-1692558 for various examples — ...


7

Nude photos is a noun phrase that has become idiomatic and manifests in slang such as "nudies" or simply "nudes". The phrase "nude photos of X" does indeed seem like a retro-construction. This phrasing is also more euphemistic or neutral, perhaps, since as you mentioned, technically, it would be "X" who is nude, but "X" is not the grammatical subject (it is ...


6

It's often the case when describing containers that we use adjectives that describe their contents rather than their own intrinsic properties. (containers isn't a technical term but it fit the concept). For example a physics textbook isn't physics, rather the contents describe knowledge we have on the field of physics your family photos aren't related to ...


5

"Attributive nouns" or the first elements of compound nouns tend to be singular in form There is no absolute rule forbidding the use of a plural noun in the first part of a compound, but it is more usual in general to use the singular form.* "Fish and chip(s) shop" doesn't seem to be an exception to this tendency. The Google Ngram Viewer suggests that both ...


5

A possible word is shadow, which can be used as a noun, verb, or adjective, and which has many different senses. Overall, it has a neutral meaning, and, even though it can be, it's not inherently associated with a profession or seen as something negative.


4

A rescue dog is something quite different from a rescued dog. From Wikipedia: A rescue dog is a dog that has been placed in a new home after being abused, neglected, or abandoned by its previous owner. The term can also apply to dogs that are found as strays, surrendered by owners for a variety of reasons, including relationship breakdowns, moving home ...


3

From the OED, bold emphasis mine: nude A3c. (adj) Of a work of art, form of entertainment, etc.: involving or portraying one or more naked or scantily clad people; performed without clothing. Also of an actor or model: that performs or poses unclothed. 1869 D. N. Camp Amer. Year-bk. I. 791 Her charms, so freely exhibited on the stage at ...


3

We say acid rain, an open compound, rather than acidic rain, a common noun modified by an adjective, because of this: Source: Wikipedia This used to be a conifer forest in the Erzgebirge (Ore Mountains) spanning Germany and the now Czech Republic, killed off by what scientists call acid deposition, when various air pollutants combine with rain to form ...


3

In Spanish, the same form is used for both the infinitive and the gerund. So when translating to English, you need to be able to distinguish between the two. Here, "correr" is a gerund, not the infinitive, so it should be translated as "running". However, in English the same form is used for both the gerund and the present progressive, so "running lover" can ...


2

runaholic One who is addicted to running. Example from I'll Meet You at the Finish!, written by Chris Pepper Shipman and published by Life Enhancement Publications (1987), page 65: One such woman complained, "My husband has become a 'runaholic'. He constantly talks about his running time, his equipment, people he has seen doing unusual things while he ...


2

I would recommend this: "Residents' Parking" because the intent is to provide clarity. Who is allowed to park there? My interpretation of those words means that this area is where (only) residents may park, and there is more than one resident, so it should be plural possessive. If it were a single parking space meant for one residential unit, then "Resident'...


2

"English origin person" sounds awkward to a native speaker. "Person of English origin" is better but still clunky, and also sounds more like something you would say of an emigrant - as in, Rupert lives in Australia, but he is of English origin. If you want to specify people of English ancestry and heritage, one option I've heard is anglo: An English ...


2

I have a few possibilities for you: espionage artist: does everything a spy can do, but isn't a spy by trade. reconnaissance artist: a person skilled in techniques of observational information-gathering. information exfiltrator: specializes in locating and extracting critical data from hostile locations.


2

When a noun is used as an adjective, it is almost always the singular form, even when the noun is not normally used as a singular. E.g: car - car alarm house - house key trousers - trouser press spectacles - spectacle maker But: clothes - clothes line So, "fish and chips" is the noun phrase, and becomes singular: fish and chips - fish and chip shop


2

Without punctuation, the sentence is somewhat ambiguous, as pointed out in the other answer. However, as written, the sentence would most likely be understood as follows:      "Which" modifies neither "voles" nor "field mice".      The word "animals" is modified by: "which you do not see"      ...


2

I think 'eye movement changes' is fine as part of a descriptive title. In that case, 'eye movement' acts as a compound adjective to modify the noun 'changes'. I have found at least one other paper in a respected journal that uses this, the full title of which is: Saccadic eye movement changes in Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies ...


2

Yes, snapshotting is a recognized word! The OED says that snapshotting derives from the verb to snapshot, which in turn derives from the noun a snapshot. [paywalled link] They provide this citation: ˈsnapshotting adj. 1978   Nature   7 Dec. 647/2Mr Sankhala also remarks that the snap-shotting tourist is so preoccupied with shutter speeds, lens ...


2

In the phrase "U.S.-China trade," U.S. is a noun: the trade is between the United States and China, two countries, each signified by a noun. If the style you're using, and it's a common one, is to use United States as a noun and U.S. as an adjective, then United States–China would be the style. However, U.S.-China is easier to read and say, and it is readily ...


1

There is a certain ambiguity, which you would normally use punctuation to prevent. Let's try some examples. There are numerous small animals - like field mice and voles - which you do not see. It is the small animals you do not see. Field mice and voles are examples. 'which' modifies the animals. Replacing the dashes with commas gives the same meaning. ...


1

Well, I think the problem with your reasoning is that "today" is not a standard noun. We can use standard nouns in this construction, such as in "I want to know the mountain weather" or "I want to know the aviation weather"—both of these sentences are okay (though they sound just a little strange). If "today" were a standard noun, then we would be able to ...


1

Compound nouns is when a noun forms a new noun when modified by either an adjective or, as in this case, by a noun. You can be more specific saying that it is a compositional compound noun, as opposed to a non-compositional noun phrase like red herring. You compose the meanings of hair and spray and can deduce the meaning of the resulting noun phrase hair ...


1

The Wikipedia article you cite states at the top of it that the article has multiple issues and may need to be deleted. 'Rescue dog' as it stands, is an ambiguous description. Chiefly Britain) A homeless, lost or abandoned dog which has been, or will be, re-homed by an animal rescue centre or charity. A dog utilised in search and rescue operations; ...


1

I could say diaper-changing but could also say changing diapers. This answer will be complex: in short, the singular tends to refer to a single instance of changing a diaper or forms most compounds involving diaper-related items; the plural tends to refer to a state of wearing diapers or a repetitive action of changing diapers. There is some crossover, or ...


1

"events sequence" is grammatically incorrect, but "event sequence" is perfectly valid. In general, it's incorrect to use the plural for an attributive noun. All nouns except the final must be singular, though there seem to be weird exceptions ("Natural Sciences Research") You could say the result of the event sequence analysis Or the result of ...


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