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50 votes

Why are they 'nude photos'?

Collocations modifying photo often don't refer to the photo as a physical object. They instead refer to the subject of the photo, or what's depicted in the image. To demonstrate this, here are the ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
46 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

One possibility: Merriam-Webster doormat 2: one that submits without protest to abuse or indignities It's metaphoric extension of the basic meaning - someone who gets "walked on" a lot.
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
44 votes

What do you call a person who loves to run?

You'd most often use a noun for the person (eg runner, jogger) and then an adjective to describe them (keen, avid). So you might call them an avid runner or a keen jogger.
Mike C's user avatar
  • 1,495
30 votes

There's a product described as "Omaha Steaks Burgers" is this proper English?

"Omaha Steaks" is the brand of the meat. Although it sounds clumsy it is correct.
KCCole's user avatar
  • 497
26 votes

Why are they 'nude photos'?

nude ADJECTIVE ... 1.1 [attributive] Depicting or performed by naked people. ‘she won't do any nude scenes’ Lexico
GEdgar's user avatar
  • 25.4k
24 votes

Why are they 'nude photos'?

It’s a way to refer to photos with nude subjects. As you can see from Ngram this expression took off from the ‘60s/70s when pictures portraying nude people, generally women, started to become popular; ...
user 66974's user avatar
  • 67.5k
22 votes

Attributive nouns without an article in programmer-speak

The nouns in your examples are being referred to as roles in the system, hence the absence of an article. It is analogous to Shortstop Trea Turner is now the second Philadelphia Phillies player ever ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 22.1k
20 votes

"Fish and chips shop" or "fish and chip shop"?

It is a "fish and chip" shop, but you order "fish and chips". Or just a chip shop since they always sell fish too. In general, a shop selling a product refers to its product as a collective noun in ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 21.5k
18 votes

There's a product described as "Omaha Steaks Burgers" is this proper English?

The brief answer by KCCole is correct: "Omaha Steaks" is a brand of meat. See "Omaha Steaks Burgers” sold by Omaha Steaks mail order company. As suggested in the comments that follow, "Omaha Steaks" ...
Rob_Ster's user avatar
  • 5,516
17 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

I would propose pushover or lapdog Pushover someone unable to resist an attraction or appeal : sucker Lapdog 2 : a servile dependent or follower
Jan Rzymkowski's user avatar
14 votes

What does "consequence-free chance" mean?

"Chance" here is used in its sense of "opportunity." "Consequence-free" is a compound adjective meaning "without any harmful result." Thus, a "consequence-free chance" means an "opportunity [to act] ...
Jeff Morrow's user avatar
  • 1,490
13 votes

What does "consequence-free chance" mean?

It's not free chance you want to look at, but consequence-free as a modifier of chance. This means a chance that is free of consequence. Let's look at other uses of -free, including a couple of ...
Arm the good guys in America's user avatar
13 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

A fashionable word is "simp". It refers to men who allow themselves to be used by women in the hope of receiving favours or approval. The older meaning of this word is "simpleton", ...
chasly - supports Monica's user avatar
11 votes

What do you call a person who loves to run?

I think Mike C. has a great answer, but if you'd prefer a noun version over an adjective, I would call the person a running enthusiast A person filled with or guided by enthusiasm. Enthusiasm, of ...
Michael W.'s user avatar
10 votes

There's a product described as "Omaha Steaks Burgers" is this proper English?

The possessive would actually not be correct here. "Omaha Steaks" is the name of a brand. As such, it is being used as an adjective in this construction and not a noun. For instance, if you had a ...
terdon's user avatar
  • 21.9k
10 votes

Why are they 'nude photos'?

It happens fairly often in English that an adjective is "transferred" from one subject to another, even when it doesn't strictly speaking apply to the latter, provided it is still relevant (in some ...
ruakh's user avatar
  • 15.5k
10 votes

Differences between "machine learning" and "machine-learning"

The hyphen shows you mean {machne learning} methods, that is: methods for machine learning, and not machine {learning methods}, that is, learning methods for machines.
GEdgar's user avatar
  • 25.4k
8 votes
Accepted

Can a noun work as an adjective, and the adjective as a noun?

Two different facts are needed to thoroughly answer this question. First, Hazel is both an adjective and a noun. Online dictionaries can be hit-and-miss in quality. Even high-quality dictionaries ...
Syntax Junkie's user avatar
7 votes

"Attributive Noun" vs " Compound Noun"

Well, here we go. Compound nouns vs attributive nouns Your research is not quite accurate. Your steel bridge is not really either and your teacup is a compound noun. However, steel is an attributive ...
Helmar's user avatar
  • 5,447
7 votes

A Latin word that is like the word "trinity" but for "five fold" or "five as one"

Quincunx is not exactly what you asked for, but it can be pretty close when used in a very slightly metaphorical sense: an arrangement of five objects, as trees, in a square or rectangle, one at each ...
Cerberus - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
7 votes

Why are they 'nude photos'?

Nude photos is a noun phrase that has become idiomatic and manifests in slang such as "nudies" or simply "nudes". The phrase "nude photos of X" does indeed seem like a retro-construction. This ...
Carly's user avatar
  • 2,792
7 votes
Accepted

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

Can I suggest milquetoast? a timid, meek, or unassertive person A milquetoast person knows they are being abused, but does nothing about it. I think it fits pretty well, though the word is often ...
Michael W.'s user avatar
7 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

Consider servile: too eager to serve and please someone else in a way that shows you do not have much respect for yourself Cambridge Dictionary
jxh's user avatar
  • 10.5k
7 votes
Accepted

"They also need the Poland international striker to help sell shirts and add appeal for potential future sponsorship deals." -- why "Poland"?

Here, Poland is a metonymy referring to the national team, the Poland national football team. Poland is also used attributively to modify the noun phrase "international striker". One might ...
ermanen's user avatar
  • 63.4k
6 votes
Accepted

Wafer -- New Adjective or Attributive Noun?

This is not a particularly new use in discussing British government. The 1970 book The battle of Downing Street says: The wafer majority of his Government... The 1976 book Walking on the ...
DavePhD's user avatar
  • 10.6k
6 votes

There's a product described as "Omaha Steaks Burgers" is this proper English?

They are suppressing the word brand. Correct phraseology would be "Omaha Steaks" brand burgers. (to the extent "burgers" itself is correct English.) It sounds like they've fabricated "Omaha ...
Harper - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
6 votes

Are there nouns that undergo no change when used in the possessive (Saxon genitive)?

I think you might be mistaking attributive nouns in noun–noun compounds for possessive nouns with apostrophes, but I’m not completely certain. When you have a child entertainer, the word child is ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 136k
6 votes
Accepted

Should "words" be plural in "The Words Hunters"?

Generally, no. The word words is an attributive noun, which functions as an adjective. Adjectives in English are not inflected for number, so even if you are hunting more than one word, Words in ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
  • 103k
6 votes

Can a noun work as an adjective, and the adjective as a noun?

In a comment, BillJ wrote: I'd take "hazel" to be an adjective, so in the NP "hazel eyes", "hazel" is an adjective modifying "eyes". And in "Her eyes are hazel", "hazel" is an adjective as ...
6 votes
Accepted

What word would work as a better substitute for "Stalker"?

A possible word is shadow, which can be used as a noun, verb, or adjective, and which has many different senses. Overall, it has a neutral meaning, and, even though it can be, it's not inherently ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar

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