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45

You'd most often use a noun for the person (eg runner, jogger) and then an adjective to describe them (keen, avid). So you might call them an avid runner or a keen jogger.


32

Because when we describe the earthquake we are talking about its location. Plus, earthquakes don't themselves, by their nature, have a connection with a specific nationality—they are not like Japanese food, clothes, tea, that are specific to the Japanese people.


30

"Omaha Steaks" is the brand of the meat. Although it sounds clumsy it is correct.


20

It is a "fish and chip" shop, but you order "fish and chips". Or just a chip shop since they always sell fish too. In general, a shop selling a product refers to its product as a collective noun in the singular. Chip shop — sells chips. Cake shop — sells cakes. Curtain shop — sells curtains.


18

The brief answer by KCCole is correct: "Omaha Steaks" is a brand of meat. See "Omaha Steaks Burgers” sold by Omaha Steaks mail order company. As suggested in the comments that follow, "Omaha Steaks" is being used as an adjective, modifying "Burgers." Calling them Omaha Steak Burgers would imply that the meat was ground from a steak, which would be ...


16

Why can't you say China citizen? Because you can already say "Chinese citizen". The phenomenon is called "blocking" in linguistics. You don't say something because there's already something else that you do say. For example, you you don't say "gloriosity" ( < glorious) because you can already say glory, even though by analogy with viscous>viscosity, you ...


15

yes, the cone is an ice cream cone because it is a cone that can hold ice cream. And it is a Soup Bowl with candy in it. You are describing the bowl to differentiate it from other bowls.


14

There is no such thing as an electrical bill. There's no difference in meaning between the other two, but Americans prefer electric bill... ...whereas Brits prefer electricity bill...


14

"Chance" here is used in its sense of "opportunity." "Consequence-free" is a compound adjective meaning "without any harmful result." Thus, a "consequence-free chance" means an "opportunity [to act] without any result that may harm [the actor]."


13

It's not free chance you want to look at, but consequence-free as a modifier of chance. This means a chance that is free of consequence. Let's look at other uses of -free, including a couple of curious ones, for a broader understanding... The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) defines -free as meaning Clear of something which is regarded as ...


12

I think Mike C. has a great answer, but if you'd prefer a noun version over an adjective, I would call the person a running enthusiast A person filled with or guided by enthusiasm. Enthusiasm, of course, being: Intensity of feeling; excited interest or eagerness. So a running enthusiast is one who is excited about running or eager to run.


11

I suppose because it is referring to a place as in "an Atlantic storm" whereas to say a "Japanese earthquake" would imply there was something Japanese in its nature.


11

Skill is a noun, not an adjective. However in that phrase it is used as a noun adjunct, so it serves as an adjective. Aside from that, I agree entirely. "Well, that matches my skill set" and "The two jobs need completely different skill sets" being valid singular and plural uses, respectively.


10

Because all three are compound nouns, which have nothing to do with the Saxon genitive. "Car service" is a type of service. "Car's service" would be service owned by a car. Much like railway is a type of way, not a way belonging to a rail. Compounds don't have to be written as one word, though. That is all.


10

The possessive would actually not be correct here. "Omaha Steaks" is the name of a brand. As such, it is being used as an adjective in this construction and not a noun. For instance, if you had a refrigerator made by General Electric, you would claim to own a General Electric refrigerator and not General Electric's refrigerator. In the same way, these ...


9

I'd prefer bookList. After all, nobody uses a books shelf, either, but a book shelf.


9

Both "hacker trick" and "hacker code" are acceptable. Technically, the word doesn't become an adjective. English nouns can act as modifiers (called attributive nouns or noun adjuncts). For more information, check out this tutorial.


9

Two different facts are needed to thoroughly answer this question. First, Hazel is both an adjective and a noun. Online dictionaries can be hit-and-miss in quality. Even high-quality dictionaries make mistakes, or will be abridged, and different lexicographers have to pick and choose what to leave out. When researching a topic like this, you owe it to ...


8

Fewer syllables = Catchier headlines, once one media outlet has started using it everyone else jumps on the bandwagon and it becomes a meme.


8

The word I hear most is noun adjective, while attributive noun and noun adjunct sound equally appropriate and current. I have never heard noun premodifier, though it sounds technically correct. I might prefer adjectival noun myself despite Wikipedia's reservations. A noun adjective is always a modifier, but not the other way around: modifier is a correct but ...


8

It's materials science because material is also an adjective. The phrase material science, as opposed to, say, spiritual science, was used before people started studying the science of materials. Consider this Ngram: If you search in Google Books for "material science" before 1910, you get hits like What does material science know about things of the ...


8

These are nice and subtle questions. Beginning with (3), there is a semantic difference between shop door and shop’s door. If I tell you I’ll wait by the shop door, then I generally mean at the front of the store (or maybe by the door for deliveries), but not, for instance, at a door that separates the shop from the living quarters. The same goes for shop ...


8

I've always taken the omission here to be or the phrase "worth of". As such, what one means when one says "two weeks' holiday" is actually "two weeks' worth of holiday" and likewise with, for example, notice and imprisonment. The worth in this case belongs to the time, just as the worth belongs to the money when one says "three quid's worth of [insert ...


7

Well, we do say hate crimes and oil spill and Mafia gangster. Those are three parallel combinations to ones you say don't work. Merriam-Webster Online has this to say: While any noun may occasionally be used attributively, the label ... attributive is limited to those having broad attributive use. This label is not used when an adjective homograph (as ...


7

I know it as an attributive noun, but according to this Wikipedia article, it's also called a noun adjunct or noun premodifier.


7

There is a cross-linguistic principle that words incorporated into compounds tend to lose any inflections (I remember an article in Language in the 80's - probably, from the index, one of the articles in Vol 62 No 1, but I haven't a copy to hand). So in English, the norm is that nouns incorporated into compounds do not take a plural ending. Where they do, ...


7

In constructions like this you generally use the singular, although there are exceptions. Some of these exceptions may be attempts to avoid ambiguity (for example, a sundry store might be a store that is sundry, rather than a store that sells sundries; a sundries store is unambiguous). Other exceptions seem not to have a reason. This is a perfect question ...


7

When a noun is used this way it is called an attributive noun or noun adjunct. One big difference between attributive nouns and adjectives is that while an adjective is predicative, i.e., a big dog is big and is a dog, a points victory is not points, but rather it is a victory when using points as the determining factor.


7

In ‘Yemen’s PM’, ‘Yemen’s’ is a possessive determiner. In ‘Yemen PM’, ‘Yemen’ is a noun modifying ‘PM’, in the same way that in a noun phrase such as ‘bank account’, ‘bank’ is a noun modifying ‘account’. Both are grammatical, but the second form is perhaps found especially in newspaper headlines.


7

Poser - you can use both meanings. #1 - a person who acts in an affected manner in order to impress others. #2 - a person posing for a picture


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