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13 votes

"Don't take it personally" vs. "Don't take it personal"

As Huddleston & Pullum (2002) note, there are a number of adverbs that are "identical in form with adjectives" but are "restricted to informal style" or "clearly non-...
alphabet's user avatar
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12 votes

Are there any adverbs ending in -ly without an adjectival counterpart?

Daily, weekly, monthly and so on are -ly adverbs with no corresponding ly-less adjectives (though of course the noun may be used attributively). The adverbial usage of daily predates the adjectival, ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
11 votes

Are there any adverbs ending in -ly without an adjectival counterpart?

Bodily, leisurely, brotherly, sisterly, motherly, fatherly, princely, womanly, heavenly, earthly, beastly, ghostly When you remove the -ly, you are left with nouns, not adjectives; however, as Edwin ...
DjinTonic's user avatar
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10 votes
Accepted

"Don't take it personally" vs. "Don't take it personal"

It depends on whether your definition of a flagrant grammatical error includes colloquial usage (since 1829!) as documented by, say, The Oxford English Dictionary: personal ADVERB colloquial. to take ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 16.5k
9 votes

Adverb for when a person has never questioned something they believe

It could be: naively - this is a simple, artless, almost naive word that means [ M-W ] "marked by unaffected simplicity" or even "deficient in worldly wisdom or informed judgment", ...
eltomito's user avatar
  • 1,592
8 votes

Are there any adverbs ending in -ly without an adjectival counterpart?

Jolly as an adverb (as in British English "jolly good") might count. It has an adjectival counterpart--the word "jolly" itself--but that adjectival counterpart isn't obtained by ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 17.5k
8 votes
Accepted

Difference in logical inevitability between therefore/thus/hence

I'm going to focus on your main question: I am trying to figure out the difference in the degrees of logical inevitability that the words therefore, thus, and hence express, when used in academic ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 17.5k
7 votes

Adverb for when a person has never questioned something they believe

I agree with "blindly", but I'd offer the second definition, which is better fitting: not thinking about or understanding what you are doing From https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/...
R Mac's user avatar
  • 3,588
7 votes

Difference in logical inevitability between therefore/thus/hence

In the mathematics literature, and by that I mean in peer-reviewed journal articles, the three are used interchangeably. And math is about nothing if not careful reasoning and fine logical ...
PaulTanenbaum's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

What part of speech is "not" when it takes the place of a conjunction?

This is a grammatical context of asyndetic coordination and use of ellipsis. I made him do it, not her. I made him do it and (I did) not (make) her (do it). (CoGEL § 13.42) Note [d] There is a ...
LPH's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Stative verbs and adjectives/adverbs

We use adverbs when we have an action verb and adjectives when the verb is stative This is not, in fact, true. Verbs of all kinds can be modified by adverbs. I think you may be getting confused by ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 17.5k
5 votes

Herewith versus herein. In this situation, is one or the other more grammatically correct and/or sense correct?

If you want your comment to mean in this document (though you probably mean in this post/in this OP?), then use herein, which is an abbreviation of in this. (see M-W) Herewith is more about attaching ...
fev's user avatar
  • 33k
4 votes

What is the status of logically pointless adjectives and adverbs, such as chairy or chairly?

Whether or not you should set your spell checker to allow those words is largely a matter of how adventurous you'd like to be in your writing - how willing you are to make your reader second guess ...
DW256's user avatar
  • 8,715
4 votes

Such + adj. only: Is that acceptable usage? Or should I use "so" only in these cases?

Is the OP perhaps trying to find a loophole or an exception where "such + adjective" is appropriate and grammatical? I don't know of any exceptions, even when the language is informal and ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 90.9k
4 votes

adjective vs adverb for a gerund

"Informally" is correct, as your example with "occasionally observing" shows. Here "noting" is a gerund, not a verbal noun. Whereas verbal nouns are modified by ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 17.5k
4 votes
Accepted

What is the adverb you use when something increases drastically?

Exponentially in a way that becomes quicker and quicker as something that increases becomes larger Cambridge Dictionary
KillingTime's user avatar
  • 6,196
4 votes
Accepted

Resounding positive vs resoundingly positive

In 1. the adverb resoundingly intensifies the adjective positive. It is as if saying: We received VERY positive feedback. If you have a look at Cambridge's entry on intensifiers, this may become ...
fev's user avatar
  • 33k
4 votes

Difference in logical inevitability between therefore/thus/hence

Academic English is a different language from English Well, not quite, but the distinction you are looking for is lost outside the particular jargon of scholarly writing and, probably, outside the ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 1,461
3 votes

How are words ending with "-edly" pronounced?

Can the pronunciation of words ending with "-edly" explained somehow, such as by some rule? No. Such "rules" fall into four categories: (i) Those that have as (at least as) many ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 41.4k
3 votes

Are there any adverbs ending in -ly without an adjectival counterpart?

Gingerly. The only true example of this I can think of. Gingerly is definitely not an adjective and Ginger as a noun or an adjective has nothing to do with the meaning of the adverb form.
Anon's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes

What's up with -ly-based: -based as a suffix on non-nouns

Where appropriate, compound adjectives of the [adverb] + [past participle] form are quite common, though the device is by no means totally productive. Roger Woodham writing at BBC World Services: ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between backward(s) and backwardly?

The only real difference that I can tease out, other than frequency trends over the years, is that backwardly can be more easily used comparatively than backward(s), the latter pair being less ...
Phil Sweet's user avatar
  • 15.3k
2 votes

Such + adj. only: Is that acceptable usage? Or should I use "so" only in these cases?

Such + adj. only: Is that acceptable usage? No. It’s wrong. It sounds awful. Or should I use "so" only in these cases? Yes, that is a good idea. most sources say that it should be ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 41.4k
2 votes

Do adverbs take complements?

You could understand look away — as does the OED — to be a phrasal verb: look, v. PHRASAL VERBS PV1. With adverbs in specialized senses. to look away 1. intransitive. To direct one’s gaze away from ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 16.5k
2 votes

Do adverbs take complements?

As Huddleston & Pullum (2002) note, there are adverbs that take complements, e.g. "independently" in "independently of abstract principles." "Away from the light," ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 17.5k
2 votes

An adverb for algorithm

Algorithmically This seems like the most direct example as it is actually IN the Merriam-Webster dictionary, online version. Directly from Merriam-Webster online: algorithm noun al·​go·​rithm ˈal-gə-...
MrWonderful's user avatar
  • 1,091
2 votes

Position of "further" in "They provide comments for me to further improve my teaching"

Grammarly is likely trying to enforce the supposed rule against split infinitives. In fact, "to further improve" is good enough for the New York Times; as just a few examples: From this ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 17.5k
2 votes

When and where did 'irregardless' first emerge in print, how did it spread, and to what extent was it viewed as a dialectal word?

Early instances of irregardless in Google Books search results As noted in the posted question, irregardless appears several dozen times in Google Books search results for the the period from 1859 to ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
2 votes

When and where did 'irregardless' first emerge in print, how did it spread, and to what extent was it viewed as a dialectal word?

Here's some information to add to your answer, which is far more thorough than mine. This is just to add a few other early citations. In your answer, you wrote: The entry for "irregardless" ...
Heartspring's user avatar
  • 8,582
2 votes

Proper Usage of "Too" in the Middle of a Sentence

Using too like that is fine, but it has a rather formal, literary flavour which contrasts oddly with the informal there's. It would sound much more natural to say, for example Apart from light and ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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