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There was always a huge quantity of food left over at [the end of the day]. The phrase the end of the day is a noun phrase. The Head noun in the noun phrase is the word end. It is functioning as the Complement of the preposition at. Some people would describe this as the end of the day being the object of the preposition at. Just in case the question was ...


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As @Lawrence commented, "for the whole weekend" sounds correct, but "for all weekend" does not. This usage of "for" is grammatically "for ". "Two hours" and "the whole weekend" are durations, but I propose that "all weekend" is actually a specific time, not a duration. "All weekend" is a noun describing the location of a chunk of time: Sat + Sun (or Fri ...


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Here is an answer to your question about this: "They then took the matter to a three-person jury of appeal [that was] specially convened to hear the case." [I am changing protest to case, but that does not affect the grammar]. The comma would make "that was" irrelevant. my answer on ELL The two criteria for appositives are: they must be right after the ...


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Today functions as an adverb of time, telling when he arrived. Dictionaries usually present today as an adverb. That's the most straightforward analysis. If you wanted, you can call an adverb an adverbial, and describe it as an adjunct that provides additional information to the sentence. Oxford Dictionaries explains the respective terms in ways that allow ...


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The whole problem boils down to one thing. Like all traditional grammarians and all laypeople, you have to stop trying to base syntactic decisions on vague intuitions about what modifies what in a common-sense way, like whether something is "giving information about" something specific or the situation as a whole. Compare this pair: [1a] Any driver, ...


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(2) It's unfortunate [that we meet under these circumstances]. (3) I have it on good authority [that you are in charge here]. (4) It's for that reason [that she is currently number one]. In [2] the bracketed content clause is an extraposed subject. The dummy pronoun "it" serves as subject, and the that-clause as extraposed subject. Compare the ...


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At the end of the day is an adverbial phrase. The clue is the preposition ‘at’. Like any modifier, it modifies (tells us about) the event or action described by the verb. In this case, it tells us when it took place. So it is temporal.


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