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18

Not necessarily. In BrE, ate is sometimes pronounced /et/, and the Cambridge Dictionary gives this pronunciation. Even if ate is pronounced like eight, there may well be subtle differences. In AmE, ate and eight appear to be pronounced the same. However, if you are learning English, I would recommend that you pronounce them both the same (/eɪt/). Cambridge ...


17

The Northeast. This US dialect splatter chart shows that just over 75% of Americans pronounce aunt and ant (the bug) the same. It’s broken down further, but the ~ohnt pronunciation is primarily from the Northeast.


15

As a native speaker of Midwestern American English, I don't hear my accent as an "accent", naturally, but I know it's there. Any English speaker will recognize that I'm American as soon as I open my mouth and start talking English (I occasionally do better in other languages), and they'll probably recognize my accent as "Midwestern", if they've ever heard of ...


13

There are two different possible questions implied here. One is for language learners, and one is for linguistics. The answer, for the language learner (and native speakers) of General American English and British English (RP or Received Pronunciation) is that 'eight' and 'ate' are entirely identical. The linguistic nuanced answer is there might very well ...


12

As mentioned in a previous answer to one of your questions, this is called Mid-Atlantic English and was commonly used in American films of the 1930s and 40s. Wikipedia gives the following reasons that someone would use the accent: Intentionally practiced for stage or other use (as with many Hollywood actors of the past). A version of this accent, codified ...


12

from comment to answer ... Actually, transcribing an Italian accent, I would probably write It's-a me. Done that way because our mythical Italian is not used to words ending in consonants.


11

The phonotactics of Italian does not include a sequence -tsm-, therefore Italian speakers naturally pronounce it dropping a vowel between -ts- (rendered as [ʦ] as in "razza", 'race' /ˈraʦʦa/ or, in phonemic notation, [ˈratːsˑa]) and -m-. The standard epenthetic vowel in Italy is [e]: e.g. in Tuscan, "sport" is, again, naturally pronounced [ˈspɔrte]. ...


11

It's supposed to represent 19th century Cockney, a working-class London dialect. I don't know if Cockneys actually switched v's & w's like this; it seems more likely to me they pronounced both letters in the same way, perhaps like a v but not quite touching the lips to the teeth, /ʋ/.


10

I know this is very late, but I would warn you that almost nobody in the United States speaks like that nor has spoken like that since before World War II. Generally speaking that accent mimicked many of the ways of speech of the upper classes in New York and Boston (listen to a recording of Franklin Delano Roosevelt: it is very similar.) The dialect that ...


10

There are two questions here, one about the phenomenon, is it actually the case that regional accents are disappearing, and the other, what is the cause of such disappearance. It is incontrovertible that accents (and entire languages) are disappearing. The articles you give links to refer to scientific articles that show that fewer and fewer people are ...


9

The character Aldo Raine is from Maynardville, Tennessee and is a hillbilly who enjoys bootlegging moonshine. While I'm unsure about the accuracy of Pitt's accent for the time period, it certainly sounds (possibly intentionally) overdone to my ears.


9

The reports of dialect death are greatly exaggerated. Yes, some homogenization of dialect features including phonology is occurring. At the same time, we're also seeing some divergence through the development of new dialects. For example, take the following quote expressing dire distress: The dialects are dying, and the competent helpers who understand ...


8

Scottish people encounter many people from the UK with different English accents. I suspect that they have become more accustomed to the variety of accents than you have.


8

Pronunciations of shortened forms and derived forms don't depend on those of originals. For instance, pronunciation ~ pronounce, professor ~ prof, library ~ lib, microphone ~ mic. Trisyllabic laxing and precluster shortening should have shortened the first vowel in library; but it has not happened. That has to do with these: trisyllabic laxing does not ...


8

There isn't any unusual accent in that speech. What you're referring to, though, is intonation, and one of the things you're specifically referring to is called vocal fry. In vocal fry, the vocal folds are shortened and slack so they close together completely and pop back open, with a little jitter, as the air comes through. That popping, jittery effect ...


7

Having grown up in east Tennessee, I can confirm that his accent is consistent with the older generation of locals from the deep mountains. It is likely that Brad Pitt spent some time in the area and adopted the thickest accent he could muster of those he heard in the region.


7

I grew up in Tennessee and live very close to Maynardville. Pitt's accent is the closest I've heard from a non-native. He would pass for a local. It's that good.


7

It is very difficult to remove an accent, whether foreign or regional, after puberty, without the aid of intense speech therapy/training. But without intense training, the trick is to, well, exaggerate what you think is the local accent you're trying to copy. Even though it may sound funny to your own ears, it'll turn out to be closer to locals than you ...


7

We have a tendency to think that speakers of languages that have a similar consonant phoneme must pronounce it in the same way, but this is not so. For example, both Czech /p/ and /English /p/ are unvoiced labial stops, but the prevocalic English /p/is aspirated, and the Czech is not. As a result, Czech speakers producing the word pan with an initial Czech ...


7

It's hypercorrection. Germans can pronounce the English 'v' just fine, they happen to write it as 'w'. So the freshman English learner from Germany will pronounce (using English orthography/pronunciation) 'water' as 'vawter'. They'll then start to associate the 'v' sound with a mistake. So the sophomore reasoning, which results in fixing some problems, ...


7

Cod as an adjective is an informal British word for "not authentic; fake". It is of uncertain origin according to oxforddictionaries.com. Here is a celebrated example of a cod-French accent: French Taunter - Monty Python and the Holy Grail.


7

I haven't found any sources that indicate something special about this particular environment. A stop-like realization of /ð/ as something like [d̪] or [d̪ð] is a common allophone in a number of accents, but it seems to be conditioned more strongly when /ð/ is preceded by a plosive (this can be seen as a kind of assimilation) or when it is utterance-initial/...


6

Oxford Dictionaries has sound recordings of all its entries. You might also like to explore these: Phonetics: The Sounds of Spoken Language The Speech Accent Archive Sounds Familiar (from the British Library – for British accents)


6

It's always attributed to Mario because he would say that in Super Mario 64 (audio)... When you started up the game, he would say "It's a-me, Mario"... There are likely other places that used this, but this is the reason it's attributed to Mario. Admittedly, I have heard it used as a terrible Italian accent, but Gen Y grew up hearing it on video games :)


6

The spelling (and for that matter also the etymology) is essentially irrelevant in the pronunciation of those words, and other WH- words with initial /h/. Sound changes apply to sounds, not spellings. Hence, any lect that drops initial /h/ will drop it on these words, too. I can't tell you anything about Cockney lects in particular, but linguists have ...


6

The uses of diacritic marks in modern English are quite limited, and diacritic marks can always be omitted without being incorrect. This applies equally to A and any other letter. Recent foreign borrowings: e.g. rôle, coup d'état, façade, etc. but role, coup d'etat, and facade are also all correct. Stage and poetry prosody: e.g. learnèd indicating a ...


6

This may not be the answer; however, I just wanted to add this. I have always thought why the digraph <au> in aunt has a TRAP vowel variant, whereas the same digraph receives LOT/THOUGHT vowels in other set of words. After reading Christopher Upward's The History of English Spelling, I have found an answer. Spelling change and pronunciation change ...


6

As OED says, tyke originally came from Old Norse tík - female dog, bitch. It's not exclusively reserved for Geordies (or people from Newcastle), but as OED also points out, it often does have that sense - "perhaps originally opprobrious; but now accepted and owned [by them]". I recall that my grandmother, who never lived anywhere but Sussex for all her 99 ...


6

You're absolutely right, there is a subtle sh sound. I've just tried it myself and I can detect different positions of my mouth and tongue as I say str words, compared to words beginning simply with s (excluding sugar and sure of course) and other s and consonant clusters. I have no knowledge as to whether this is more marked in different regions, but I ...


6

Palatal vowels (i), semivowels (y), and liquids (r) often influence the sound of preceding consonants, a process called palatalization. This is most obvious with dental consonants like t and s, which typically become tch and sh. For example, train often sounds like tchrain. Palatalization is consistent for some English forms, like the shun sound of the -...


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