125

It means "if you couldn't be bothered to read the preceding material because it looked too long (and possibly boring), here is a summary for you". The meaning is quite close to 'executive summary'. tl;dr is used to call out another user on the length of their post. However, in cases of more courteous exchanges and serious discussions, tl;dr can be self-...


75

People all over the Internet have asked the same thing—which, on the face of it, suggests that different forum posters (and perhaps, in some cases, the same people at different times) have used it to mean both things. For example: Does OP mean Original Post or Original Poster or both? (AnandTech, posted January 7, 2005) Does OP mean the original ...


72

It's an abbreviation of committee.


72

My guess is that distro might have been inspired by shortenings like repo[sitory], algo[rithm], memo[randum] &c.


65

Lībra in Latin originally means ‘stone’, thence ‘pound weight’ (i.e., the little stone you put on scales to weigh things), thence ‘pound’ (the weight of one of those stones), and only from that was the meaning generalised to mean ‘weight’ in general. The phrase lībra pondō ‘a pound by weight’ was then used to refer unambiguously to the second meaning. The ...


61

A string of letters doesn’t have to be in a dictionary to be a word, but, as it happens, there is an entry for legit in the Oxford English Dictionary, where it is given as both an adjective and a noun and defined as being a colloquial abbreviation of legitimate. The earliest citation is from 1897. Whether and how you use it is up to you.


61

I use an apostrophe to indicate the place where letters have been omitted. What'll I do (' = wi/sha) I'd say (' = woul/shoul/coul) How ya doin' (' = g) Ya is an alternative form of 'you' (- regional or colloq. = you pron.(OED)) Since there are no letters missing in 'ya' there is no apostrophe.


57

Due to the Latin influence, "-o" is a much more natural-sounding ending for a singular noun in English than "-i". My best guess is that this subconsciously affected the coinage.


51

It's slang for (and an abbreviation of) Original Gangster. someone who has been around, old school gangster Urban Dictionary Commonly used to refer to someone who is not a gangster, but is considered highly skilled in a particular area.


49

(Note this answer was previously posted to a question which has since been deleted on Programmers.stackexchange.com) The abbreviated form char, short for character, can be pronounced in several different ways in American English: here's how you represent the various pronunciations in American English using the International Phonetic Alphabet: char as in ...


47

In the past, the abbreviation cf was used in texts. It's short for Latin confer, meaning 'compare'. You could still use it, but not everyone will understand it. Probably the best answer now is simply See.


45

Abbreviations and contractions of words follow many conventions, take for example the word continued I have seen it abbreviated/shortened/contracted or clipped in three ways. cont cont. cont'd Mathematics can be similarly contracted math math. (math's) maths Perhaps, originally, the written form with the apostrophe, math's, was more common in Great ...


42

It certainly wouldn't have been impossible for some alternate history version of English to have ended up with those abbreviations. However, we need to consider the things that lead to abbreviations happening at all. The need for them has to be relatively common and they have to actually shorten significantly. If neither of those is true, nobody will bother ...


41

BCE/CE usually refers to the Common Era (the years are the same as AD/BC). That is, BC is usually understood to mean "Before the Common Era" and CE to mean "Common Era," though it is possible to reinterpret the abbreviations as "Christian Era." The simplest reason for using BCE/CE as opposed to AD/BC is to avoid reference to Christianity and, in particular, ...


41

This is used primarily for job postings from countries which use languages with different words for the masculine and feminine job titles (like English actor/actress, sculptor/scupltress, dominator/dominatrix, etc). Appending "m/f" or similar is a concise way to indicate that applicants of any gender are welcome. It may be a legal requirement in some of ...


33

Probably the best way of shortening Look at is to use see. See ELU Stack See is idiomatic; look at is not generally used to direct people's attention to other resources in this way. Look at is used in speech ("Look at that!"), and it's interesting that see usually appears in writing. [Note too that e.g. does not mean "example given"; it means exempli ...


32

In those three examples, there are three different, albeit related, reasons: Xing = Crossing. The "X" replaces "Cross" because an X is a cross. Xmas = Christmas. The "X" replaces "Christ" because the cross is a symbol of Jesus and because X (really Chi) is an initial for "Christ" in Greek (Χριστός). Xfr = Transfer. The "X" replaces the prefix "trans-" as ...


32

The OE has an extensive entry on the -o suffix ($) which I excerpt here: The shortening of a word immediately after a medial o , and in particular where this occurs at the end of a prefix or combining form, first appears in the late 17th cent. and early 18th centuries, e.g. plenipo n., memo n., and hypo n.1 This probably established an association ...


32

The etymology of "versus" is pretty simple. It came from Latin and it was originally used in English in the law sense (as it's still used today: Roe v. Wade). Later on it started to be used more flexibly. There are several abbreviations that have been used for versus: v., vs., and ver. Both vs. and v. (with and without the period) are mentioned in Oxford ...


31

I have seen million, billion, and trillion abbreviated as M, B, and T respectively. However, I would not bet that that is a standard abbreviation. $3.1M settlement in Daniel McCormack priest sex abuse case for Chicago Archdiocese Lawyers: $9M settlement for boy's cerebral palsy - Washington Times JPMorgan reaches record $13B settlement with DOJ Big ...


30

It is highly unlikely that there is a global standard. It differs based on practice and the standards set by the relevant authorities (publishers and the like). Ex: The Oxford Journal Instructions for Authors suggests (Sec. 2.3): Abbreviations where the last letter of the singular word is not included take a full stop (vol., vols./ed., eds.). The ...


30

I believe the answer to the question in the title of your original post is “cont.”, but the usual way of putting that on an application or résumé is spelled “present”, as in “2012 – present”.


29

Related to this question is the fact that another symbol was also originally derived from the word libra. This is the symbol £, which is an ornate letter "L" (from libra), now used to denote the Pound sterling, more commonly referred to as the British pound (ISO code GBP). Prior to 'decimalisation' in February 1971, British currency followed the structure ...


29

I worked in banking for 27 years (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and Bank of America), and my experience in financial services was that M and MM were consistently used for thousands and millions, respectively. This practice was across the board - exam reports, internal reporting, and so on. They never used K for thousands. It would be bad form to mix K ...


28

In American legal documents, "v." is normally used as the abbreviation of "versus" when describing the parties in a case, like if Mr Jones sues the XYZ Corporation the case will be called "Jones v. XYZ Corp". Or if the government charges someone with a crime, it will be "The United States v. Fred Jones". Outside of legal documents, "versus" is normally ...


28

English writing often uses slashes to form two-letter abbreviations, plus the one-letter w/ – some examples, roughly in order of frequency: I/O – “input/output” w/ – “with” c/o – “care of” A/C – “air conditioning” w/o – “without” R/C – “remote control” b/c – “because” Like most abbreviations, these are less common in formal writing, although some of them (...


27

Is legit an actual word, or is it a slang word that has been shortened from legitimate? Any "or" question can be broken down into two questions, so let's do that. Is legit an actual word? There are two common definitions for "actual"; it can mean "existing" or it can mean "genuine". So let's break that down into two questions: Is legit an existing ...


27

The pronunciation of "distribution" is: dis·tri·bu·tion — [dis-truh-byoo-shuhn] — /ˌdɪstrəˈbyuʃən/ "-stri" would typically be pronounced similar to the beginning of "street" or "stripe". "-stro", on the other hand, would be pronounced similar to the beginning of "strobe" which isn't exactly the same but close enough in American English that ...


26

I'd go with expansion if I were forced to fill in the blank (although I'm more comfortable with expansion of than expansion for). You can expand an acronym. However, it would be more usual to say: What does ELL stand for? Or: ELL stands for English Language Learners. Especially in non-technical contexts, stand for sounds more natural to my ear.


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