Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 95331

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you're specifically seeking only a single word, see the "single word requests" tag too.

3
votes
If the not-dentist-pretending-to-be-a-dentist (the impostor) asked the friend to give a recommendation, the friend is a shill for the impostor. SHILL (noun) An accomplice of a hawker, gambler or …
answered Aug 26 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
3
votes
This question has generated a lot of wordplay, which might mean nothing to your translator. ("articulate" and "articulated", as you may know, have distinct meanings in English that have little if any …
answered Feb 11 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
"This is something you need to follow while coding." A more polite way is to say "This is a best practice which we {follow/use/apply/observe/implement}when coding here at [company].
answered Jul 4 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
3
votes
I would call it an open-ended list.
answered Apr 5 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
4
votes
As I see it it seems to me It seems likely I have observed One can postulate In my experience As far as I can tell Consider this: You can see that One might argue that the evidence can lead one to co …
answered Jul 4 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
13
votes
happenstance (n) A chance happening or event. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/happenstance?s=t Fortuitous (adj) Happening or produced by chance; accidental http://dictionary.reference.c …
answered Jul 17 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
As commenters suggested, "subset" and "superset" can be used. As for a term that applies to both, you'll be hard pressed to find one that applies to both equally, as they have an "asymmetrical relatio …
answered Mar 22 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
Most of the numbers you cited are what one could call "arbitrary". That is, they were made up (or might as well have been. Pulled out of a hat, as it were.) Many of them could also be described as " …
answered Dec 26 '14 by Brian Hitchcock
7
votes
The closest English idiom I can think of is "Opposites attract." This is usually used in romantic context, but it only covers the first sense you mentioned, that enemies always meet. There are othe …
answered Jan 31 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
What stops a murderer from killing another innocent soul, and then another, and then another, etc.? I would suggest avoiding the list, to obviate choosing a way to terminate it. What stops a murd …
answered Sep 13 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
8
votes
win by a fluke http://www.google.com/search?q=fluke+definition&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en this means it was not a likely win, but by a fortuitous set of circumstances it happened anyway.
answered Jun 20 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
You might say Company X had achieved both horizontal and vertical monopolies. See definitions of "vertical integration" and "horizontal integration".
answered Dec 19 '14 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
I would say he is preoccupied (by thoughts of her). He has a preoccupation (with her). Or, she is his preoccupation. http://i.word.com/idictionary/preoccupied http://i.word.com/idictionary/preocc …
answered Jun 30 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
He forsook [X] [for / to pursue] [Y].
answered Jan 10 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
With regard to books, the traditional way is to refer to "the reader" (singular). This means the typical reader. Sometimes this phrasing is even used within a book (especially in a Preface) to avoid …
answered Apr 20 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
simile or metaphor might work best. "just part of the scenery", "as familiar as the furniture". Or you could say that something "disappeared into the background".
answered Dec 15 '14 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
In the case of the gyroscope, or any system that "tries" to maintain its current, stable state, you could say that it "seeks" homeostasis. You might say that markets similarly tend to re-balance—over …
answered Apr 20 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
a slab is a very thick slice. (I know, that's not an adjective.) Other possibilities might be a {hearty/ substantial/ generous} slice. ...but if you really want the opposite of the thinnest-p …
answered Apr 29 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
If you upvote an answer or comment simply because it has a lot of downvoted, you are rooting for the underdog However, you said you didn't want the amswer/ comment to win; just to fail more "gentl …
answered Jul 9 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
10
votes
I really think you're best off sticking with folded object. It is clear and unambiguous—it doesn't need explaining. Why grasp for a neologism that really won't save much space (how many times will yo …
answered May 7 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
2
votes
In the US, It depends on whether the vendors' "stuffs" (sic)* includes food. If it does, the enforcement is more likely to be for a violation of health-related licensing requirements, so it would be d …
answered Jun 28 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
5
votes
knows it inside and out To know something "inside out" or "inside and out"? knows it from A to Z http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/from-a-to-z knows it backwards and forwa …
answered Oct 3 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
Usually, an AmE speaker would say Is it your turn yet? Your other way is not completely wrong; it just asks something slightly different—you might be asking whether it is nearly his turn yet. But …
answered Jun 12 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
He has broad interests or **a wide range of interests*". If he makes a conscious effort to develop additional interests, he is broadening his interests.
answered Oct 4 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
One term that has been used is working manager https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=Working+manager&case_insensitive=on&year_start=1900&year_end=2010&corpus=17&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url …
answered May 7 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
It sounds like you are trying to say that the Abstract should be observational only. Or that it should be non-analytical. Or that it should draw no conclusions from the data.
answered Jun 13 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
One word won't do it; it will always be either too narrow or too broad The items you listed encompass some foods some drugs, some remedies, and "supplements". So any of these words, alone, define …
answered Jul 26 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
Let's "get down to the [real] nitty-gritty" http://www.google.com/search?q=nitty+gritty+definition&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en
answered Jun 26 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
votes
6answers
In warm, humid climates: If you take a container of something (say, a can of Coke or a jar of mayonnaise) and leave it at room temperature, the outside becomes wet with droplets of water— sometimes * …
asked Jul 23 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
4
votes
If the device can access networks (voice and/or data) without a wired connection, it can be called a mobile device. This includes all cellphones, smart and dumb, as well as tablets and other small co …
answered Mar 27 '15 by Brian Hitchcock

15 30 50 per page