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Results tagged with Search options user 95331

This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning. The selection to choose from must appear in the question. If you do not know the word already, use single-word-requests.

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In answer to the second question: "Ted removed Mary from task 33."(especially if there are still others assigned to it.) You could also say "Ted unassigned Mary from task 33." You would not use "resig …
answered Dec 21 '14 by Brian Hitchcock
0
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There is absolutely nothing wrong with "usefulness". It is longer than "utility", but more ordinary, and free of the connotation you mentioned about "utilities". I cannot think of any instance where …
answered Mar 20 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
5
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"Internecine" is an adjective that carries some of that connotation. It can apply to either a conflict in which both sides suffer severe damage, or to an internal fight among factions within a group o …
answered Dec 25 '14 by Brian Hitchcock
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"enrolled in" would suggest you are a student rather than a teacher. Teachers do not "enroll" in a class; the "roll" is a list of students only.
answered Dec 26 '14 by Brian Hitchcock
3
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In reference to "complaint", they are virtually identical in meaning. Usage preference is a matter of chronology and which-side-of-the-pond: "File a complaint" is more common in American English sin …
answered Jun 28 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
I think it might be [First] Year of Planting. Here is a page from a nursery supply company. In the next-to-last paragraph it refers to a "successful first year planting". http://www.vintagenurseries …
answered Jun 10 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
Perhaps if you used something other than "car" in your example, you would get interesting and useful answers. As it is, the only thing I can say is that you would not say you "brought" your car with …
answered Jan 15 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
2
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In it, my surroundings were the same as these.
answered Mar 24 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
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"Much AS they had done with her". Traditionally, "as" and "much as" compare verbals (and qualities) whereas "like" and "much like" compare nouns. That is, "as" acts as an adverb, and "like" is much …
answered Nov 30 '14 by Brian Hitchcock
2
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Try this: Low speed Medium speed High Speed This is simpler than trying to find a midpoint word between "slow(ly)" and "quick(ly)". This is the terminology you would see on a three-speed kitchen …
answered Jun 13 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
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The transition process can take many paths may have various destinations can take many forms Or. . . say the paths of transition are many [and varied] numerous mutifarious
answered Jun 14 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
2
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You could say that it stirs emotion(s). ( This is in the sense of awakening, not mixing up.)
answered Apr 8 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
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Sledding requires a sled (or as some responders have called it, a sledge. I think "sledge" is British; I know Americans call it a sled.) I went sledding as a kid, in western Washington state. What …
answered Jan 31 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
The second is correct. In the first, "just by the fact that x" creates an adverbial phrase, which needs to have a verb associated with it. For example "Just by the fact that the course is new to me, I …
answered Jan 2 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
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Say that each of a,b, and c were multiplied by a certain factor in each instance, to yield the next row (B, C, D).
answered Aug 12 '15 by Brian Hitchcock

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