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This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you're specifically seeking only a single word, see the "single word requests" tag too.

1
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"This is something you need to follow while coding." A more polite way is to say "This is a best practice which we {follow/use/apply/observe/implement}when coding here at [company].
answered Jul 4 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
3
votes
If the not-dentist-pretending-to-be-a-dentist (the impostor) asked the friend to give a recommendation, the friend is a shill for the impostor. SHILL (noun) An accomplice of a hawker, gambler or …
answered Aug 26 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
3
votes
This question has generated a lot of wordplay, which might mean nothing to your translator. ("articulate" and "articulated", as you may know, have distinct meanings in English that have little if any …
answered Feb 11 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
3
votes
I would call it an open-ended list.
answered Apr 5 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
4
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As I see it it seems to me It seems likely I have observed One can postulate In my experience As far as I can tell Consider this: You can see that One might argue that the evidence can lead one to co …
answered Jul 4 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
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Most of the numbers you cited are what one could call "arbitrary". That is, they were made up (or might as well have been. Pulled out of a hat, as it were.) Many of them could also be described as " …
answered Dec 26 '14 by Brian Hitchcock
7
votes
The closest English idiom I can think of is "Opposites attract." This is usually used in romantic context, but it only covers the first sense you mentioned, that enemies always meet. There are othe …
answered Jan 31 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
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What stops a murderer from killing another innocent soul, and then another, and then another, etc.? I would suggest avoiding the list, to obviate choosing a way to terminate it. What stops a murd …
answered Sep 13 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
8
votes
win by a fluke http://www.google.com/search?q=fluke+definition&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en this means it was not a likely win, but by a fortuitous set of circumstances it happened anyway.
answered Jun 20 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
vote
You might say Company X had achieved both horizontal and vertical monopolies. See definitions of "vertical integration" and "horizontal integration".
answered Dec 19 '14 by Brian Hitchcock
1
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I would say he is preoccupied (by thoughts of her). He has a preoccupation (with her). Or, she is his preoccupation. http://i.word.com/idictionary/preoccupied http://i.word.com/idictionary/preocc …
answered Jun 30 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
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He forsook [X] [for / to pursue] [Y].
answered Jan 10 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
0
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With regard to books, the traditional way is to refer to "the reader" (singular). This means the typical reader. Sometimes this phrasing is even used within a book (especially in a Preface) to avoid …
answered Apr 20 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
-1
votes
"I [will/ expect to] graduate from XXX with a [BA/BS] in [major] [this/next] [June/February/whatever]."
answered Feb 22 '15 by Brian Hitchcock
1
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As commenters suggested, "subset" and "superset" can be used. As for a term that applies to both, you'll be hard pressed to find one that applies to both equally, as they have an "asymmetrical relatio …
answered Mar 22 '15 by Brian Hitchcock

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