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Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

5
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I'm afraid none is correct. You don't need any preposition in that sentence. You could simply write: The design is so unified and everything is where it should be. Note that I changed from "they …
answered Sep 4 '11 by Alenanno
10
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No, the preposition "on" indicates that something is on top of something else; this can be either physically or not. On also indicates "with contact", unlike above that indicates "without contact", s …
answered Sep 12 '11 by Alenanno
2
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From the OALD: copyright (in/on something) if a person or an organization holds the copyright on a piece of writing, music, etc, they are the only people who have the legal right to publish, broad …
answered Apr 28 '11 by Alenanno
1
vote
You're asking about Government in Linguistics, right? I think the best way (and maybe the only one, even if I'm not aware of such lists available for English since it's not really a Case-based languag …
answered Apr 18 '11 by Alenanno
2
votes
The "for" in the end refers to "What" at the beginning of the question. "What for?" means "For what reason?" or "for what purpose?", so you could say the question this way as well: For what reaso …
answered Apr 10 '11 by Alenanno
9
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This is in my NOAD, check the third paragraph: USAGE Between is used in speaking of only two things, people, etc.: "we must choose between two equally unattractive alternatives." Among is …
answered Aug 11 '11 by Alenanno
4
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Nice question, +1. I think you're right even if they are pretty much interchangeable (consider the context!), and this is shown in the dictionary too. Even though there are some subtle differences: …
answered Apr 11 '11 by Alenanno