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This tag is for questions about phrases in the linguistic sense. In linguistics a “phrase” is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function. Use [phrase-requests] if you are searching for a phrase.

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I couldn't find anything about this on dictionaries in order to explain it with definitions, but basically the meaning is this one: Trust and security are important for any application; before we …
answered Aug 16 '11 by Alenanno
6
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Nowadays, among it's meanings it has this one: hail verb 1. [trans.] call out to (someone) to attract attention: the crew hailed a fishing boat. 2. signal (an approaching taxicab) to stop: she …
answered May 25 '11 by Alenanno
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"Sure thing" is an informal expression that means "Sure/Of course/Certainly"... Look at this example from the NOAD: "Can I watch?" - "Sure thing!" Or this one taken from the OALD: "Are y …
answered Jun 20 '11 by Alenanno
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I found several entries for to get, in the phrasal verb section, so I thought I'd include them all. I separated them so the message is more comprehensible. Note that the last two are very similar exce …
answered Jun 8 '11 by Alenanno
8
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Lay bare is an idiom that means "to reveal or to explain something that was not known or kept secret before." There are other explanations such as "to discover or tell people about something that was …
answered Sep 10 '11 by Alenanno
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It means that since they have the same (unusual, in this case) tastes, they must be relatives and therefore must have been separated at birth, because at that moment they get to know each other like t …
answered Sep 2 '11 by Alenanno
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I found the first entries during history, not the exact origin of the expression, unfortunately. They are around the 17th Century. by the by (earlier by a by, on or upon the by): by a side way, on …
answered Apr 4 '11 by Alenanno
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My dictionary says that "Not to say..." is "used to introduce a stronger alternative or addition to something already said." It is easy to become sensitive, not to say paranoid. He was large, …
answered Apr 22 '11 by Alenanno
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I think your question is related to Copyright and Copyleft. The Copyright is when the material copyrighted can't be acquired with non legit media (downloading, piracy) and can't be copied, distribute …
answered Apr 2 '11 by Alenanno
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"Needs to be done/washed/fed" is the correct way of saying it, I think. "Needs done" sounds incomplete, but I found out, on Askville and also on the English Forums.com, that it is a regional way of …
answered May 31 '11 by Alenanno