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This tag is for questions seeking a single word that fits a meaning. To ensure that your question is not closed as off-topic, please be specific about the intended use of the word.  INCLUDE A SAMPLE SENTENCE demonstrating how the word would be used.  Click on "Info" or "View Tag" and "Learn more ..." for more information. Please use the "phrase-requests" tag instead if you seek more than just a single word.

0
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Perhaps: Locator(s); Locatability?
answered May 2 '11 by Marcin
0
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Offens(iv)e or transgression is what you are looking for, I think. If you want a word that covers everything that is both illegal, and frowned on, but not illegal, you could simply use "forbidden".
answered May 26 '11 by Marcin
0
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Chaplain does sound like the right word (after all, it refers to a position of ministry, not of religious function). "Animal Chaplain" sounds like you minister to animals, which isn't quite right. "An …
answered Jun 29 '11 by Marcin
17
votes
The answer depends on the physical nature of what the place is - it might be a stall, a cart, a van, or something else. In the case of the sellers pictured, they are located at what appears to be a …
answered Dec 12 '11 by Marcin
0
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A loophole is a term of derision for an exception in a law (or other legal regime). You appear to be asking for a term to describe the practice of pretending that what one is doing is legal. There's …
answered Oct 19 '11 by Marcin
16
votes
The standard word is "currency". It doesn't just refer to money. (In fact, the usage to refer to money comes from certain coinage being "current" in a certain locale, i.e. commonly accepted. Accordin …
answered Jan 6 '12 by Marcin
0
votes
"The bereaved" refers to someone who has suffered great loss, whether through the death of another or otherwise.
answered Jun 5 '11 by Marcin
3
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Intern seems to be accepted here to refer to paid summer work, especially in international organisations (for example, I was an intern at Lehman Brothers in London). In IT, "summer student" used to b …
answered Jul 5 '11 by Marcin
1
vote
Midnight is the equivalent for noon: they both refer to a specific moment in time, and the times very close to them.
answered Jun 4 '11 by Marcin
2
votes
You probably want "parochial" - it imports locality and a lack of relevance outside of the locale. "Local" might be what you want, but it's less strong.
answered May 30 '11 by Marcin
6
votes
Provincial. This is the term sometimes used in the UK.
answered Jun 7 '11 by Marcin
1
vote
The closest is perhaps a tagline, but even that is not a great fit.
answered Jan 6 '12 by Marcin
4
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Depending on the misuse, "coincidence", "apposite", or "unfortunate".
answered Jun 4 '11 by Marcin
2
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Cohort. These words describe cohorts of students. A better question is why American institutions aren't content to simply use ordinals (or cardinals) to describe their cohorts.
answered Jun 5 '11 by Marcin
23
votes
Times: Dawn refers to the time around the actual solar event that is sunrise. Morning refers to any time before noon, so 1am is still the morning. Very early morning is sometimes known as "the small …
answered Jun 4 '11 by Marcin

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