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This tag is for questions about the meaning of a longer passage of English. A SPECIFIC CONCERN must be emphasized.

2
votes
It is a lovely story about a dog, who describes events of his days, and on this day, he is visiting other dogs not far away, in particular, Robin Adair, the dog of a Scottish Presbyterian minister.
answered Jan 16 '14 by anongoodnurse
1
vote
"Pull-Out" programs remove students from mainstream classrooms for a portion of the day in order to give them specialized instruction in particular areas - ESL, for example, or advanced areas of study …
answered Mar 31 '14 by anongoodnurse
1
vote
I think you're right in that there's a little difference in nuance, but not a lot. That's that to me means End of Discussion. That's it to me means that's all. I do believe there is more flexibility …
answered Dec 20 '13 by anongoodnurse
2
votes
A proverb is a short pithy saying in general use, stating a general truth or piece of advice. Synonyms include: saying, adage,maxim, axiom, motto, epigram, dictum, and precept; they are words of wisdo …
answered Dec 11 '13 by anongoodnurse
3
votes
These are examples of idiomatic language. There is no rule guiding idiomatic use; people use it because they've heard it in their region, their home, their peer group. How it starts, I can only guess. …
answered Apr 6 '14 by anongoodnurse
19
votes
Mark twain's comment relies on the sarcastic use of tautology: needless repetition of an idea, statement, or word. The author Dan Brown mistakenly makes a lot of tautological statements, parodie …
answered Jul 21 '14 by anongoodnurse
2
votes
Give-back (coined in 1975–80) refers to a negotiation tactic of labor unions; basically the union/employees would give back some of their gains (usually wages) in return for something more valuable, s …
answered Apr 3 '14 by anongoodnurse
10
votes
Mrs. Mummery is tired. Why is she tired, Mr. Mummery might wonder. "Mrs. Mummery is tired because she works too hard. I warned her, but she insisted on turning out the dining room today" says the …
answered Apr 16 '14 by anongoodnurse
4
votes
You will have to do that This is the future tense. You will need to. If you want to lose weight, you will have to eat less or exercise more. You have to do that This is the present tense. …
answered Feb 28 '14 by anongoodnurse
1
vote
I didn't think I would find anyone here, being a Sunday and all. And all is not a filler. It means and all that is associated with the fact (that it is a Sunday). It means people usually do other thi …
answered Mar 15 '14 by anongoodnurse
2
votes
Often when someone finds a new word, they need to look up not only that word, but also others. Then you'll understand not just one word, but several. Abjection: a low or downcast state: each confe …
answered Oct 20 '14 by anongoodnurse
7
votes
In the poem, the author is using the phrase somewhat sardonically. Though there was discrimination against Blacks, it didn't matter in battle: the white troops had their orders but the Negroes l …
answered Mar 16 '14 by anongoodnurse
2
votes
It is an idiom (the Free Dictionary) which means: for the sake of; on behalf of. In the interest of honesty, are you minimizing any important details that your prospects should know? The questi …
answered Aug 20 '14 by anongoodnurse
2
votes
"I knew [him/her] when" is an idiom in English. It is not about the speaker's age (I knew her when I was young is not an idiom.) It is more about a defining event or series of events in the life (no m …
answered Jun 12 '14 by anongoodnurse
1
vote
"I don't/didn't want to believe it," implies something so unpleasant that it is difficult to allow that such a thing could happen. When I heard about the train derailing, I didn't want to believe …
answered Dec 14 '13 by anongoodnurse

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