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Results tagged with Search options user 547

This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning. The selection to choose from must appear in the question. If you do not know the word already, use single-word-requests.

0
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It's true that this is used in cataphoric reference and that hardly ever; but they are also both widely used in anaphor, the basic difference then being that this is proximal, that distal. In practic …
answered Nov 15 '14 by Colin Fine
0
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"Issue" as a transitive verb, normally means "publish" or "make available by some process". It is used of documents, books, tickets, passports etc., not of musical notes. The meaning here is the int …
answered Dec 10 '17 by Colin Fine
1
vote
I think you're looking for a thesaurus
answered Dec 7 '18 by Colin Fine
2
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I think you are right that these are not actually conditionals at all. I think that they are a different kind of construction, expressing that the statement is not known but is a surmise, deduction or …
answered Jun 8 '12 by Colin Fine
-1
votes
This is one of many cases (like "is a tomato a fruit or a vegetable?") where the answer is different depending on whether the context is technical or everyday. Technically, certainly contagion is di …
answered Apr 13 '12 by Colin Fine
3
votes
I would prefer "speak", because "talk" usually has a direct or indirect object. It doesn't strongly require one, so the "talk" option is possible; but for me "speak" would be more idiomatic.
answered Sep 16 '11 by Colin Fine
3
votes
In some English dialects, but not any Standard Englishes as far as I know, them is used where standard English uses those. Edited for clarity: this is just a lexical oddity of those dialects. It is …
answered Sep 15 '15 by Colin Fine
1
vote
You are mis-parsing it. The relevant phrase is the complex quantifier "not so much ... as ...". The clause parses as [[not so much] [signs whose referents have disappeared] as [mummies]]. or t …
answered Dec 17 '14 by Colin Fine
2
votes
I don't think there is a generally known word. I would call it reciprocating, or sweeping in alternate directions, but I would not expect people to understand without explanation.
answered Jan 1 '14 by Colin Fine
5
votes
In modern English, relative which is not usually used of people. Either who or that will do fine. I would use who.
answered Jul 30 '16 by Colin Fine
2
votes
Since we can say "write Perl" (or PHP, or for that matter, French) as well as "write in Perl", there's nothing wrong with 1. But 2 is certainly more symmetrical, and it's what I would write.
answered Nov 2 '11 by Colin Fine
0
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The only way I have used or heard pioneer as a verb is transitively, the object being the novelty, for example: Lister pioneered the use of vaccination. I find pioneer new projects a little odd, …
answered Sep 19 '13 by Colin Fine
1
vote
"Ended" refers to a process, whereas "finished" and "gone" can refer to objects as well. "Ended" is also rather literary.
answered Oct 24 '11 by Colin Fine
4
votes
I think in context "Mtsensk Day" would be both clear and natural. It's not a concept I'm aware of in any English-speaking town, but we do have Yorkshire Day for the county.
answered Jul 19 '18 by Colin Fine
7
votes
"Beef with" remains very informal (and mostly American), but may be fine in your context. I have never heard "grief" used in this way. In its literal use it can be countable ("I have many griefs" = " …
answered Apr 6 '16 by Colin Fine

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