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Results tagged with Search options user 547

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

15
votes
The normal form of a negative infinitive is "not to X", in all contexts. The form "to not X" is grammatical (notwithstanding the generations of people who have moaned about "splitting the infinitive" …
answered Nov 16 '11 by Colin Fine
2
votes
I find both to be possible, but "opportunity to be here" sounds more natural to me. Note that there isn't a general rule: it depends entirely on the particular word that governs it (here, opportunit …
answered May 5 by Colin Fine
2
votes
Many words (particularly verbs, but also adjectives) limit the kind of construction they can take as their object. Able and capable can have similar meanings, but take a different kind of complement …
answered Jan 1 '14 by Colin Fine
5
votes
I think your colleague is wrong. Somebody has noticed a partial pattern and has elevated it to rulehood. The use of infinitive (with and without to) vs gerund is purely syntactic, depending on the su …
answered Jul 3 '15 by Colin Fine
112
votes
Gollum's speech is consistently shown as non-standard. He regularly adds an additional "-es" to already plural words (eg "pocketses"). This is a case of adding "-s" to a verb form that does not need i …
answered Jul 10 '18 by Colin Fine
3
votes
I'm not sure you can generalise among verbs. For "like", I think there is no difference in meaning, but I find "like ski jumping" far more natural than "like to ski jump"; however, I have an impress …
answered May 12 '11 by Colin Fine
2
votes
Because that is the way English is. I'm sorry, but that is the whole of the answer. You can discuss the historical development, compare different constructions, but there is no known way of predic …
answered Sep 15 '14 by Colin Fine
2
votes
Because help (like want and force) takes a direct object for the person or actor and optionally an infinitive clause with to. [That is a more detailed version of because it does, some form of which i …
answered Mar 12 '15 by Colin Fine
2
votes
Continue may take to do or doing. Stop (in this sense) may only take doing, as stop to do means something different, as you say. Sorry, that's just the way English is.
answered Apr 18 '13 by Colin Fine
1
vote
Particular English verbs require particular kinds of grammatical structure for their objects. If the person who is to take the action is expressed, Recommend takes either a that clause or an infiniti …
answered Dec 3 '13 by Colin Fine
0
votes
GloWbE (the Corpus of Global Web-based English) has 10182 instances of "Option to [verb]" against 4850 instances of "Option of [verb]ing". So it appears that both are in common use, with the first ar …
answered May 17 '16 by Colin Fine
7
votes
Antony Quinn is correct, but I think it could do with a little more explanation. No. 1 is perfectly understandable, but would not be used by a native English speaker. However, compare the following: …
answered Oct 4 '10 by Colin Fine
6
votes
"Recommend that they are" has been occurring increasingly since 1950, but is still far less common than "Recommend that they be": See this ngram: http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/chart?content=recommend …
answered Sep 12 '11 by Colin Fine
2
votes
I don't think it does, necessarily: I think this is a subjective call. To me "He likes to read books" seems odd, and actually I associate it with written American English, but I don't know whether m …
answered Apr 10 '11 by Colin Fine