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Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
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migrated:no
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is:answer
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Results tagged with Search options user 49989

This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning. The selection to choose from must appear in the question. If you do not know the word already, use single-word-requests.

1
vote
"Who" is the subject of a sentence; "whom" the object. "Who told us about that?", "Ask not for whom the bell tolls". janoChen: "I think I got confused because I thought like: "The one who gave the s …
answered Oct 5 '13 by ZZMike
0
votes
"Desirable" usually refers to persons, so "if desired" would be better. This is a little formal, and would work in a business situation. But I agree with Kevin - his version is more straightforward. …
answered Oct 10 '13 by ZZMike
0
votes
"Almost" and "exactly" are contradictory. If something is "almost", it cannot be "exactly", and vice versa. In spoken English, I would say "In just about a hour". I assume you mean to say "as close …
answered Aug 19 '13 by ZZMike
0
votes
"Speed" is fast or slow, so "speed of" something is "faster" or "slower". "Price" is low ("cheap") or high ("expensive"). Notice that both sentences should have the word "than" following, because bo …
answered Oct 1 '14 by ZZMike
3
votes
"... people in Britain apparently being asked for their 'second-name' ..." That really wouldn't work in Britain: Many people have at least three: "James Edward Henry Phillips". Even our recent A …
answered Oct 13 '13 by ZZMike
0
votes
To summarize @Jon Hanna: "Thee", "thou", "thine", "thy", &c, are all archaic forms no longer used in standard English. Some communities, such as the Amish and Quakers, may still use them. If you wer …
answered Nov 24 '13 by ZZMike