Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 4972

This tag is for questions about verbs. Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a verb. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the verb.

3
votes
From an AmE speaker, this is perfectly fine. It's not a particularly common or newspaper-y word. It is most commonly used (and often) in the context: Quit dawdling and tie you shoes or you'll be l …
answered Apr 12 '11 by Mitch
1
vote
The verb 'to be' is not special here. Your examples are correct but only in a stilted, overly formal, hardly used context. In the rare context it would be incorrect to use the simple present. But i …
answered Jun 7 '12 by Mitch
1
vote
Yes, I met a problem sounds a little odd but is perfectly fine. It's metaphorical, an example of personification. So now you have three choices with different stylistic connotations: - 'met' …
answered Dec 22 '11 by Mitch
2
votes
If this is a mathematical context, then Two functions are equal if they evaluate to the same values on same input, that is, they overlap everywhere.
answered Oct 6 '11 by Mitch
4
votes
'And'ing and 'or'ing are somewhat informal because of how they 'verbify' the conjunctions. 'Conjunction' and disjunction' are the nouns describing such clauses (and note that 'conjunctino' does doubl …
answered Apr 18 '12 by Mitch
5
votes
The written phenomenon, of 'you right' used to mean the statement 'you are right', is well documented. (many examples at google books. Most of the examples seem to be AAVE which very characteristica …
answered Feb 17 '12 by Mitch
0
votes
None of these sound natural, either the verb or the preposition. Here are examples of idiomatic (natural sounding) English: The car is parked. The car is parked in the driveway. The car …
answered Jun 3 '16 by Mitch
6
votes
He sidled along the ledge. moving sideways or obliquely.
answered Jan 4 '13 by Mitch
7
votes
You're touching on a number of concepts here: transitive, intransitive; active, passive; grammatical, semantic. When I heard about the election results, Transitive, active: it freaked me out. …
answered Nov 16 '16 by Mitch
3
votes
to punch is to hit someone with a closed fist, most likely in the face, as in boxing. to thump is to make a dull striking sound produced by hitting something If you punch someone, that cou …
answered May 15 '12 by Mitch
2
votes
Grammatically: "I know that S" where S is a sentence like "It is raining outside right now" "I am aware of NP" where NP is a noun phrase like "the fact that it is raining outside right now" Semant …
answered Apr 20 '11 by Mitch
1
vote
Simply put, 'every instant' is acting like 'always' but would normally be put later in the sentence. It is in a somewhat infrequent, non-standard word order. To simplify the sentence step by step, …
answered Dec 23 '18 by Mitch
2
votes
There are a couple of technical grammatical or linguistic words that can be applied to your situation. collocation "a noticeable arrangement or conjoining of linguistic elements (such as words)" - t …
answered Aug 13 by Mitch
11
votes
Interestingly enough, many 'knowledge'-describing words are somewhat vague. 'True' and 'false' are incontrovertible (except when people are using them sloppily) but between those two there's a lot of …
answered Feb 13 by Mitch
0
votes
The sentence can be simplified with the same basic structure: A member of staff objects to something. Somebody objects, and 'object' expects a prepositional phrase afterwards, the object of the …
answered May 16 '18 by Mitch

15 30 50 per page