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Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

3
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The verb 'belong' as used here means 'to be in the right place or a suitable place'. You can follow it with many prepositions of place or location such as in, on, under, over, etc. That dishonest man …
answered Jun 30 '18 by Michael Harvey
1
vote
We use 'than' in statements of simple comparison. Bill is older than Rachel. Canada is bigger than Japan. I am shorter than my brother. Steel is stronger than wood. Comparison: clauses We use 'as' w …
answered Dec 4 '18 by Michael Harvey
1
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Both sentences are correct, but they mean different things. 'Take advice of' (with no article before 'advice') is slightly old-fashioned British English meaning 'seek the opinion of'. One might, wh …
answered Feb 17 by Michael Harvey
-1
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Use since. We use the present perfect progressive tense (e.g. 'have been') to describe an action that began in the past, continues in the present, and may continue into the future. We use 'since' to d …
answered Nov 18 '18 by Michael Harvey
0
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"In" is used with expressions of time to express a period, after which something will happen - I'll see you in a week; I'll be ready in one hour (I'll see you after a week has passed; I'll be ready af …
answered Jan 24 by Michael Harvey
0
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Although it appears in the Journal of Samuel Pepys, written in the 17th century, using "Off of" for "off" is an error in standard modern English.
answered Jun 6 '13 by Michael Harvey
1
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They can both be used to mean the same thing, especially in British English. This has been the case for over 300 years. Some people think that the possessive (e.g. 'their') form is more formal or old- …
answered Feb 27 by Michael Harvey
2
votes
'For' means "in good time for". In Britain, formal invitations for dinner used to say "7 for 7.30", meaning that you can arrive from 7 PM onwards, but should definitely arrive before 7.30.
answered Mar 25 by Michael Harvey
2
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be desired to specify a particular prison or type of prison, and one would use the prepositions 'in' or 'at', e.g. in an adult prison, a federal or state prison, a juvenile correction facility, etc …
answered Aug 3 '18 by Michael Harvey
3
votes
"Sit" and "stand" are not "opposites", any more than "eggs" and "bacon" are opposites. When describing location, we often use verbs of posture. Bristol sits/stands/lies at the lowest place on the Rive …
answered Jul 29 '18 by Michael Harvey
0
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'Of such a [thing]' means 'of a thing of the particular type just described'. The consequences of such a gluttonous diet are the consequences of the type of diet just described. Such
answered Nov 18 '18 by Michael Harvey