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This tag is for questions about the use of capital letters in writing.

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We capitalise proper names, and nicknames, but not terms of endearment (e.g. "honey", "son", "pal", etc), so if he is formally or informally named "Old Man", then it would be capitalised, otherwise no …
answered Sep 16 '18 by Michael Harvey
2
votes
queen. Capitalization (Titles) Many American academic and commercial style guides recommend capitalising, and the general rule seems to be to capitalise words derived from proper names. Webster's … II New Riverside University Dictionary says: Words derived from proper names, except in their extended senses: the Byzantine Empire. Capitalization Whichever style you choose to follow, be …
answered Feb 10 by Michael Harvey
3
votes
There is no "rule" that the letters making up initialisms must be all one case. In Britain, Transport for London is abbreviated to "TfL", and the Court of Protection can be either the "COP" or "CoP". …
answered Aug 10 by Michael Harvey
5
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A sentence is terminated by a period ("full stop") ("."), a question mark ("?"), or an exclamation mark ("!"). What follows a question mark, therefore, whether a question or not, is a new sentence, wh …
answered Sep 10 by Michael Harvey
4
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Capital P, capital R. It is a proper noun. In The Germ, a journal published by the artistic group themselves, William Rossetti, brother of Dante Gabriel, in 1850, shows the name of the group as "Præra …
answered May 5 '18 by Michael Harvey