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This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

5
votes
It is an example of ellipsis. You are eliding the word valid at the end of the sentence “I think the last valid example is not valid.” It is perfectly grammatical. It might be considered a kind of us …
answered Nov 2 '10 by nohat
7
votes
It’s a participle being used as an adjective (like “the walking dead” or “the setting sun”). It’s a little unusual, in that the phrase “next customer” is the common idiom in English, but I can’t see w …
answered Aug 13 '10 by nohat
12
votes
Here is how the example sentences are grammatical: The old man the boats. The old [people] [man/serve on] the boats While Anna dressed the baby spit up on the bed. While Anna [got] dressed, the baby …
answered Sep 26 '10 by nohat
19
votes
There are many incidences of that’d meaning “that would” in the Corpus of Contemporary American English: SPOKEN 208 (2.39/million words) FICTION 384 (4.7/million words) MAGAZINE 58 (0.67/mi …
answered Aug 31 '10 by nohat
22
votes
Provided that we accept the archaic is become as grammatical use of the present perfect—which I would not use for something so prosaic as a paper for a criminal justice course—there are still two prob …
answered Sep 29 '10 by nohat
20
votes
The semantics of the verb allow meaning "permit" has three arguments, making it a trivalent verb. Using the linguistic terminology for thematic relations, there is the entity that is granting the perm …
answered Mar 6 '12 by nohat
4
votes
If there were an enormous cheeseburger and you cut it up and served pieces of it to separate people, then you could say you “ate cheeseburger” last night. Otherwise, cheeseburger is a count noun and y …
answered Sep 14 '10 by nohat
13
votes
The Merriam-Webster Online dictionary gives a third sense of redact: 3: to obscure or remove (text) from a document prior to publication or release This is now the most common meaning of the wor …
answered Oct 25 '10 by nohat
6
votes
I think the sentence is fine. If it were spoken quickly, a native speaker would have no trouble understanding what is meant. However, the use of the conditional in the if clause ("If I would have gon …
answered Feb 6 '14 by nohat
51
votes
When I first heard about this usage in a grammar lesson in middle school, it sounded weird to me, too. As in the linked page in your answer, my teacher taught us that using possessive pronouns (also k …
answered Sep 6 '10 by nohat
46
votes
What makes you think this is an error? All the greatest writers of English have started sentences with and. Mark Liberman, linguistics professor at the University of Pennsylvania wrote about this myth …
answered Aug 13 '10 by nohat
4
votes
There are certain idiomatic phrases ending in it which could conceivably be followed by another it: So I take it it is not going well. Why is it it always rains when I forget my umbrella? Both of …
answered Mar 7 '14 by nohat
15
votes
Contractions are generally considered informal, but have long been part of standard English. Because they are informal, most style guides—which tend to be guides for formal styles of written English—a …
answered Sep 30 '10 by nohat
12
votes
Text can be used as a verb both transitively and intransitively, in many different ways. It usually means only messaging by SMS (short message service) using mobile telephones. Other forms of textual …
answered Jun 17 '11 by nohat
11
votes
Affixes (prefixes, suffixes, and the like) can be characterized by what linguists call “productivity”. A productive affix is one that can freely be applied to most any word of the class it applies to. …
answered Aug 13 '10 by nohat

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