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This tag is for questions related to definitions and nuances of meaning of a word or phrase.

4
votes
Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) lists the term under safe-deposit box, and reports a first-occurrence date of 1874: safe-deposit box n (1874) : a box (as in the vault of a …
answered Nov 18 '14 by Sven Yargs
4
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The "feet" here are poetic feet—units of rhythmical meter that collectively make up to a full line of poetry. If the rest of a poem consists of lines of five iambs (or iambic feet) each ("da DA da DA …
answered Jun 14 '15 by Sven Yargs
1
vote
The comment seems to pose Hemingway as a miniaturist more interested in painting miniatures well than in undertaking a large-canvas work that might be beyond his current powers. Here is the paragraph …
answered Sep 3 '14 by Sven Yargs
4
votes
of the stanza a bit more demonstratively: It is the serious person who can crow at the end of the merriment. "He laughs best who laughs last." So rather than meaning "The sad man is the butt of …
answered Apr 23 '15 by Sven Yargs
0
votes
definitions, it's hard to find support for the notion that bickering is for adults and squabbling is for children. But the similarity in meaning of the two terms across many decades is striking—especially …
answered Oct 16 '13 by Sven Yargs
1
vote
. [First two cited instances:] 1925 in Fraser & Gibbons, Soldier & Sailor Words {ref to WWI}: To get the crackers, to go off one's head. Mad. 1928 in OEDS: I shall go "crackers," (meaning mad) if …
answered Dec 2 '15 by Sven Yargs
1
vote
I could find only one instance of similar phrasing in a Google search. From Fashawn, featuring Exile, "Bo Jackson," on Boy Meets World (2009): Light an incense/ My million dollar windpipe expensiv …
answered Sep 24 '16 by Sven Yargs
7
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From Tom McCourt, Cowpokes to Bike Spokes: The Story of Moab, Utah (2007): Slickrock is a term used to describe outcroppings of smooth, weathered sandstone. There are thousands of acres of the stu …
answered Nov 9 '15 by Sven Yargs
3
votes
The context of the story is "two very shabby looking young men" standing on the corner of a snowy, muddy, slushy street in Chicago on Christmas Eve. Passing vehicles throw freezing slop on them, and t …
answered Jan 7 '14 by Sven Yargs
3
votes
word is facing fierce competition from the German Gesundheit, DARE reports from its many interviews that scat's meaning of "begone" is frequently used in the South from Florida to Texas (heaviest in …
answered Dec 22 '17 by Sven Yargs
1
vote
There are actually two ways to understand "For all Clark says" in the OP's example. One is the interpretation that chasly from uk and Brian Donovan give of it: "For all Clark says" means something lik …
answered Jan 16 '16 by Sven Yargs
5
votes
Most storm systems do not have a clearly formed center or eye, with strong winds swirling around a relatively calm center, but hurricanes (strong tropical cyclones) do. When the eye of such a storm mo …
answered Jun 20 '13 by Sven Yargs
12
votes
I grew up hearing (and reading) a similar story from Aesop for Children (1919), a fable called "The Sheep and the Pig": One day a shepherd discovered a fat Pig in the meadow where his Sheep were p …
answered Dec 20 '14 by Sven Yargs
1
vote
from the verb promise: Promise, engage, pledge, plight, covenant, contract come into comparison as meaning to give one's word that one will do make, give, accept, or the like, something stipulated …
answered Mar 1 '15 by Sven Yargs
5
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sense of "acted as a predator upon"—a meaning that Merriam-Webster as yet does not officially acknowledge, but that is not at all rare in recent Google Books matches such as this one, from Folia …
answered Jan 19 '15 by Sven Yargs

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