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Results tagged with Search options user 3405

This tag is for questions about phrases in the linguistic sense. In linguistics a “phrase” is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function. Use [phrase-requests] if you are searching for a phrase.

2
votes
The phrase is clumsy and unclear, but I wouldn't say it's actually incorrect. A better rendering might be: What are the factors that Twitter takes into account when deciding whether to open itself …
answered Jan 9 '11 by psmears
4
votes
I'm not certain, but I think he is playing with a few common phrases here (and not very successfully in my view): to turn (an offer, an idea) down means to refuse it to turn (the the volume, the …
answered Jul 2 '11 by psmears
1
vote
You could say: I left after watching the better play positive I would come and see it again. ... or is that cheating? It's possible someone would say *You need to win this match, so you'd b …
answered Jan 16 '11 by psmears
7
votes
The phrase "about to" implies that the action described is in the very near future - that it is on the point of happening. So, of your two alternatives, I am close to launching a start-up company. …
answered Feb 8 '11 by psmears
17
votes
How about: He came within spitting distance It happened in the blinking of an eye (not human but) I'll be with you in two shakes of a lamb's tail
answered Mar 20 '11 by psmears
3
votes
It means "at an unknown time in the very immediate future" - i.e. we don't know exactly when Nana will arrive, but we expect her to arrive very soon, and possibly immediately.
answered Jul 5 '11 by psmears
8
votes
It is grammatical (as far as it goes - I assume you're using it as part of a longer sentence!). It is also potentially ambiguous, as you say - it could be interpreted to mean the place where we made …
answered May 21 '11 by psmears