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Results tagged with Search options user 314435

for questions about the sound, stress, or intonation of spoken words.

5
votes
pronunciation depends on whether it is stressed, although it is usually spelt A. Unstressed it is pronounced /ə/. Knockhaspie may or may not be a real name but it is a regularly formed anglicized …
answered Oct 22 '18 by David Robinson
0
votes
War. Even amongst those old enough, some will have forgotten the word and its H pronunciation, since it has virtually never been heard since, except in the historical context of the Falklands war, and specialist contexts such as history lessons and lectures. …
answered Apr 12 by David Robinson
0
votes
With the two plosives, /pb/, in the middle, it is quite hard for English-speakers to pronounce and you end up with it sounding like two separate words and you almost end up with each syllable getting …
answered Sep 16 '18 by David Robinson
2
votes
It was much more common in centuries past to use different names in different languages than it is now. It would have been quite normal for this person to use language-specific names. His name in Engl …
answered Jan 17 by David Robinson
1
vote
impossible to write déjà vu on a standard English-language typewriter. The accents make a difference to the pronunciation using either English or French rules. In this particular example they do not …
answered Nov 13 '18 by David Robinson
2
votes
Since this question asks about whether people can tell the difference I am going to answer for myself and my dialect rather than referring to a dictionary. I speak Standard Southern English English a …
answered Dec 5 '18 by David Robinson
1
vote
It's not completely true that it is not Greek. Yes, it is IPA, but they needed so many symbols for IPA that they borrowed from Greek for some of them. Many of them, ⟨ɑ⟩, ⟨ꞵ⟩, ⟨ɣ⟩, ⟨ɛ⟩, ⟨ɸ⟩, ⟨ꭓ⟩, …
answered Apr 7 by David Robinson