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This tag is for questions about verbs. Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a verb. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the verb.

3
votes
According to dictionarydotcom it doesn't exist as a single verb. truth Meaning "accuracy, correctness" is from 1560s. Unlike lie (v.), there is no primary verb in English or most other IE l …
answered Jul 30 '18 by S Conroy
0
votes
It will depend on the context. In a chronological narrative you would use simple past. e.g. In 1999 the first X came out. As early as 2000 XXX was developed. In 2001 developers discovered a new …
answered Jul 17 by S Conroy
0
votes
My answer is speculative. Perhaps it's a case of blocking, where the slot for higher as a verb was already occupied at the time that the verb lower entered the language by way of its older adjective. …
answered Sep 15 '18 by S Conroy
17
votes
With 'er' 'or' 'ist' suffixes you are usually dealing with an agent noun From the Wikipedia link: In linguistics, an agent noun (in Latin, nomen agentis) is a word that is derived from another …
answered Aug 30 '18 by S Conroy
1
vote
'Fishing for information' might be what you're looking for 17.to seek to obtain something indirectly or by artifice: to fish for compliments; to fish for information.
answered May 12 by S Conroy
5
votes
It sounds a bit like 'abound'. -- You could ask: Could you expound on that? verb (used without object) to make a detailed statement (often followed by on). You could also say: Could you elabor …
answered Aug 2 by S Conroy