The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 244135

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word. The word has to be provided within the question. The question should be limited to the usage of one word. For the usage of complete phrases there is the tag phrase-usage.

4
votes
It's okay to use naught for "nothing" or the digit zero. There is nothing technically wrong with doing it. However, I would caution in how much you use it. It's not common in the U.S. whatsoever. Espe …
answered Jul 8 '17 by Kace36
6
votes
tldr; - See: SO WHERE DID COPYPASTA COME FROM Josh wrote a very interesting question about the origins of the term copypasta. I find it very intriguing as well. He did some excellent homework on the …
answered Jul 13 '17 by Kace36
3
votes
The simple answer is: authored by XYZ would be the most fair and logical choice if XYZ actually represents the sole author, or, small group of authors, which are all named at XYZ. It would also make …
answered Jul 26 '17 by Kace36
0
votes
There is 1 expression in the above conversation "We could see the whole of London.". It sounds wrong to me because it is a specific ability & therefore we need to use "was able to" So, It is b …
answered Jul 5 '17 by Kace36
0
votes
Study programs and education programs are virtually synonyms in this sense. They are basically the same thing. However, most people might tend to think that study programs indicates more intense or a …
answered Jul 6 '17 by Kace36
1
vote
The origins of the preposition "unto" come from "until" (see link) and technically it does just mean, "to". So, theoretically you could replace "to" with "unto" and get the same meaning by that measur …
answered Jul 24 '17 by Kace36
1
vote
Definitely use "supersede". It's much more idiomatic. "Obviate" is not really a proper definition for what you want and even if it were it would only serve to confuse other developers potentially. Go …
answered Jul 12 '17 by Kace36