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13
votes
The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL) has a lot to say about worth. It is a little like an adjective and a little like a preposition. I will argue both sides, for your entertainment. W …
answered Apr 2 '11 by Jason Orendorff
0
votes
I don't know about your terminology, so perhaps my analysis won't be of use to you; but this is how I'd parse your example according to modern grammar. I just can't figure out, what would “No matt …
answered Apr 22 '11 by Jason Orendorff
29
votes
Get ready for more mixed signals. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL) gives an analysis that differs dramatically from the other answers here. It says that yesterday, today, tonight, …
answered Mar 17 '11 by Jason Orendorff
0
votes
I can think of numerous examples of adjectives that can tell how many. A singular common count noun needs a determiner if it is to serve as direct object (and most other places, actually). So if He’s …
answered Apr 22 '11 by Jason Orendorff
13
votes
The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has three pages on anaphoric so. It concludes: ...its properties are unquestionably unique, and we do not believe that anything is gained by forcing i …
answered Apr 6 '11 by Jason Orendorff