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This tag is for questions seeking a single word that fits a meaning. To ensure that your question is not closed as off-topic, please be specific about the intended use of the word.  INCLUDE A SAMPLE SENTENCE demonstrating how the word would be used.  Click on "Info" or "View Tag" and "Learn more ..." for more information. Please use the "phrase-requests" tag instead if you seek more than just a single word.

0
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NominSim is right. Also, the people that wear them are soldiers. It is part of the ceremonial uniform of the guards regiments. They are literally, made of bear skin.
answered Jun 6 '12 by Tristan
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I'm surprised that no one mentioned the word soppy, yet. Here: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/soppy and http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/soppy?q=soppy It's commonly used in t …
answered Jul 30 '12 by Tristan
6
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Thus, my question is, is there a term for the sound of a bicycle bell? Yes. One that is simple and straight to the point is the word ring. There is a useful definition here http://dictionary.camb …
answered Sep 5 '13 by Tristan
1
vote
The word friendly, would be suitable in this context.
answered Apr 18 '13 by Tristan
0
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That's a good point by Noldorin but, it needs some clarification. Yes, in the UK, there isn't an equivalent to "High School Diploma". The UK does not have the American, "High School" system. It gene …
answered Apr 8 '12 by Tristan
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You could try the word county.
answered Apr 12 '12 by Tristan
11
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So my question is, what are indoor taps really called? Like this one: http://biltema.no/no/Bygg/VVS/Baderom/Blandebatterier/Servantbatteri-86568/ That seems to depend on which English you use. …
answered Mar 3 '13 by Tristan
6
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I don't think there is anything wrong with saying turn, in this context. See http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/turn_4 , which has the following definition of the word: to (cause to) b …
answered Nov 7 '13 by Tristan
2
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Other words for this are gasbag http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/gasbag?q=gasbag loudmouth http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/loudmouth?topic=speakers-and-talkers …
answered Oct 5 '13 by Tristan
4
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You can say that they are British. That would include people and things of Northern Ireland, as well. For referring to people who are from Northern Ireland in particular, you can say Northern Irish as …
answered Mar 4 '13 by Tristan
5
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Is there a better name? There is no need for one. The word Indian, is fine. It's widely used. If you are confused with the other use of the word, just say native American. It is simple.
answered Jun 10 '13 by Tristan