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This tag is for questions related to definitions and nuances of meaning of a word or phrase.

3
votes
A paint-by-numbers kit consists of a prepared board printed with lines enclosing areas together with small pots of paint and a brush. Each pot of paint has a number assigned to it and each area on the …
answered Nov 26 '16 by BoldBen
1
vote
Welcome to EL&U, Ali."The proverbial couch" is a reference to the term couch potato. Merriam Webster defines it as : a lazy and inactive person especially : one who spends a great deal of time w …
answered May 19 by BoldBen
2
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"Subjecting the components to the process" just means "Carrying out the process on the components". If you do something to an object or a person you subject it or them to whatever it is you are doing. …
answered Dec 8 '18 by BoldBen
2
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The puzzle is a form of acrostic. There are several types of acrostic, most common these days being something more like a codeword puzzle but the original acrostics going back at least 2000 years were …
answered Jun 13 by BoldBen
0
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meanings and b)in its slang meaning it can be applied to products, music, experiences and many other things which could never have been described as "debonair", but it is used currently to describe people in much the same way as "debonair" used to be employed. …
answered Apr 27 '18 by BoldBen
2
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Yes, it is used in British English, but mainly for athletics and equestrian events. I don't think I've ever heard it applied to team sports. The following links are examples of the usage from the Net: …
answered Nov 18 '16 by BoldBen
0
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not taken is a great cause for sadness, partly because of its futility. This is the meaning of "...it might have been." The parody reverses the course of events and has the judge and the farm girl … parody's message is that taking the "romantcally right" path can lead to more regret than taking the more sensible path. This is the meaning of "It is but it didn't ought to be". …
answered May 20 by BoldBen
0
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To understand the phrase you need to know what a commanding officer is. Merriam Webster defines the term as an officer in command especially an officer in the armed forces in command of an organi …
answered Aug 26 by BoldBen
2
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It means roughly three-quarters of the way back from the front row of pews. If there were 12 rows of pews they would be sitting somewhere in rows 8 to 10. The term "the middle pews" is most likely to …
answered Feb 3 by BoldBen
2
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The phrase "The highest as the lowest form of criticism" means that the highest and lowest forms of criticism (and by implication all the other shades of form between them) share a characteristic: in …
answered Apr 20 by BoldBen
0
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welcome to EL&U. The sentence means one of three things to me: 1) John has a more discerning palate than Louise and can distinguish more flavours 2) John knows more about food and as is, therefore, …
answered Apr 18 by BoldBen
0
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There are several meanings of the word "have" and the online Collins Dictionary entry has many of them. One of these is If you have someone do something, you persuade, cause, or order them to do i …
answered May 27 by BoldBen
1
vote
A Crombie Coat is one of range a classic outerwear made by the tailoring company Crombie (founded 1805 according to their website). It's a high quality, high status coat which has been worn by a numbe …
answered Jun 15 by BoldBen
9
votes
The Cambridge online dictionary defines divorcee as a man or a woman who is divorced and who has not married again (in the UK) and ​ a woman who is divorced and who has not married again (i …
answered Jul 27 by BoldBen
0
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thee well" meaning to perfection only dates from the late 19th century and only in the US. As a British person I'd never heard it used that way at all. …
answered May 29 '18 by BoldBen

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